Final Exam Wednesday, 6/15 or Thursday, 6/16

Here are the guidelines for the notes sheet that you can use on the exam:
  • Both sides of an 8.5" x 11" sheet
  • Handwritten
  • Whatever you want
  • I will also provide an additional formula sheet

  • There are 25 multiple choice questions and about 15 problems.
    Class 81 Monday 6/12/17

    Image result for frisbeeWarm-Up :  

    1.  How does a "Frisbee" work?

    2.  Why is "Frisbee" in quotation marks?

    3.  Typical sport discs tend to roll over in the air.  For a right hander throwing a forehand, does the disc tend to roll to the thrower's right or to the thrower's left?

    4.  What are two solutions to the problem described in #3, above?

    5.  One explanation which has been offered to explain the direction of the roll is uneven lift between the front and the back of the disc.  If this is the case, where do you suppose the stronger lift would be found, at the front or at the back of the disc?

    Today: 

    Homework: 

    • Exam preparation
    Image result for nearsightedClass 80.5 Friday 6/8/17

    Warm-Up :  

    1.  Why can't humans see clearly under water?

    2.  Guess which condition (on the right) makes it easier to see clearly under water?

    3.  Goggles and masks can be used to see clearly under water, but they distort the observed heights of objects.  Do they magnify or reduce?  Why?

    Image result for diving mask

    Today: 

    Homework: 

    • Exam preparation
    Image result for optic nerve blind spotClass 80 Thursday 6/8/17

    Warm-Up :  

    1.  What would you guess is the approximate focal length of the human eye?

    2.  Does that focal length change?  Explain.

    3.  Why do we have a blind spot?

    4.  How can you "find" your blind spot?

    5.  How does a pinhole camera work?Image result for pinhole camera

    6.  Regarding the lower diagram on the right, why is it necessary for the rays to cross in order to form an image?Image result for ray tracing diagram person with convex lens

    Today: 

    Reading:  Chapter 25.6 -- Image formation by lenses

    Homework: 

    • If you're exempt from the exam, prepare to take the optics quiz tomorrow or on Monday.
    Class 79.5 Wednesday 6/7/17

    Warm-Up :  

    1.  What is the shape of this solar cooking dish?

    2.  Why is this the best shape for this type of solar cooker?

    Today: 

    Reading:  Chapter 25.6 -- Image formation by lenses

    Homework: 

    Class 79 Tuesday 6/6/17

    Warm-Up :  

    2.  What are RGB and CMYK color models?  What's the difference?

    Today: 

    Reading:  Chapter 25.6 -- Image formation by lenses

    Homework: 

    Class 78.5 Monday 6/5/17

    Warm-Up :  

    Fred is conducting a laser experiment on a very, very, very fast train.  He attaches a mirror to the roof of the train car and shines a quick pulse of laser light directly upward at the mirror.  Hank is standing still outside the train.  The train car is made of glass, so Hank can see the whole thing.

    The pulse of laser light goes up, reflects off of the mirror, and then goes back down to the floor.  There's enough dust in the air to make the laser pulse visible.

    1)  If Fred and Hank were to draw the laser's "flight path" (as each of them sees it), what would each of them draw?

    2)  Who would see light travel a greater distance?

    3)  Assuming that Hank and Fred see light traveling the same speed, who sees it travel for the longest amount of time?

     

    Today: 

    • Check/discuss homework. Solutions 25.5.  Solutions 25.6.

    • I will not be checking any more homework. If you want to know if you're exempt from the exam, be sure to submit your instrument slideshow ASAP.

    • Exam Review.   I hope to provide a more convenient list, plus solutions, soon.

    • Optics quiz on Friday (or Monday) for exempt seniors.  The quiz will cover chapter notes and practices 25.1-25.6, including the notes and practice from tomorrow's class (25.6, part 2  Notes  Practice  Solutions).

    Reading:  

    Homework: 

    Class 78 Thursday 6/2/17

    Warm-Up :  

    The ability of the observer on the right to see the penny depends on whether the penny is wet or dry.

    1.  When can he see the penny?

    2.  Explain why.

    Today: 

    • Adam test score?

    • Return papers.  Discuss homework. Solutions

    • Notes:  Ch 25.5-25.6

    • After today, we have three full classes and three short classes of physics.

    • Final exam review packet on Monday. 

    • Is anyone (non-exempt) planning on being absent on the final exam day?

    • Optics test:  Non-Exempt Students -- optics will be part of the final exam.  Exempt Seniors -- optics test will be separate and taken on the last day of class (Monday, 6/12).  Corrections may be completed during exam week.

    • Create Instrument Recordings.  Do not count on class time to work on this on Monday.   string instrument slideshow directions and grading Example

    Reading:  

    Homework: 

    Class 77.5 Thursday 6/1/17

    Warm-Up :  

    1) What are major and minor scales?

    2) How are they played on a piano?  What about a fretted string instrument?

    Today: 

    Reading:  

    Homework: 

    Class 77 Wednesday 5/31/17

    Warm-Up :   No warm up today

    Today: 

    • Bonus point Doppler challenge

    • Test

    Reading:  

    Homework: 

    • In case you haven't already done this... complete the odd numbers only in Practice 25.3/25.4.  Solutions
    • Have your instrument ready to make recordings tomorrow. 
    Class 76.5 Tuesday 5/30/17

    Warm-Up :  

    primary and secondary rainbows

    4.  What is the connection between these pictures and refraction?

     

     Today: 

    • Test tomorrow.  4 Minute Drill.  Questions?

    • Check/review homework and laser activity

    • Instrument recordings and analysis will have to happen on Thursday.  Preview of recording process.

    Reading:  

    Homework: 

    • Test tomorrow over sound/waves notes, all homework practice problems, and the material on the practice test.  Optics will not be on the test.  Material corresponds roughly to Chapter sections 16.9, 16.10, 17.1, 17.3, 17.4, and 17.5.  Mr. Pennington's test review sheet from last year (modified slightly).  Bonus points may be earned by using your instrument to determine the velocities of passing vehicles.
    • Have your instrument ready to make recordings on Thursday.  To understand what completed means, see the string instrument grading criteria.
    Class 76 Friday 5/26/17

    Warm-Up :  

    It is a common experience for words viewed in a mirror to appear to have been flipped.   Suppose you look in a mirror while wearing a shirt that says "shirt." 

    1.  Which shirt shows what you will see? 

    2.  Why does the word get flipped that way, and not the other way?

     Today: 

    Reading:  

    Homework: 

    • Complete the odd numbers only in Practice 25.3/25.4.  Solutions
    • Test on Wednesday over sound/waves notes, practice test, and today's SHM notes.  Material corresponds roughly to Chapter sections 16.9, 16.10, 17.1, 17.3, 17.4, and 17.5.
    • Instruments must be completed before class on Tuesday.  To understand what completed means, see the string instrument grading criteria.
    Class 75.5 Thursday 5/25/17

    Warm-Up :  

    The diagram below shows top views of the same boy looking into mirrors.  On the right, the mirror is a simple flat mirror.  On the left, the mirror is two separate mirrors arranged at right angles.  The boy has one blue eye and one green eye.

    When he looks in the mirrors, where will his blue eye appear to be?

     

     Today: 

    Reading:  

    Homework: 

    • Practice 25.1-25.2  Solutions
    • Test on Wednesday over sound/waves notes, practice test, and today's SHM notes.  Material corresponds roughly to Chapter sections 16.9, 16.10, 17.1, 17.3, 17.4, and 17.5.
    • Instruments must be completed before class on Tuesday.  To understand what completed means, see the string instrument grading criteria.
    Class 75 Wednesday 5/24/17

    Warm-Up :  

    These are transverse representations of longitudinal sound waves.

    1.  What does the statement above mean?

    2.  How are the waves similar?

    3.  How are they different?

    4.  What do they sound like? link won't work on school wifi

    5.  What would a cosine wave look like?

     Today: 

    Reading:  

    Homework: 

    Image result for simple harmonic oscillatorClass 74.5 Tuesday 5/23/17

    Warm-Up :  

    The figures on the right show a mass that is oscillating back and forth in a frictionless situation.  What factors determine the rate at which the mass is accelerated by the spring?

     Today: 

    Reading:  

    Homework: 

    • None
    Class 74 Monday 5/22/17

    Warm-Up :  

    1. How does a violin bow cause a string to vibrate at its resonant frequency?
    2. How does rubbing your finger on the rim of a glass create sound?
    3. What steps would one follow to break a glass with one's voice?  Would you like to try?

     Today: 

    Reading:  

    Homework: 

    Class 73.5 Friday 5/19/17

    Warm-Up :  

    How can we use a piano to measure something's speed?

     

     Today: 

    • Return Tests

    • Intro to the homework

    • Finish string instruments

    • Begin homework.

    Links:

    Reading:  

    Homework: 

    • Complete Measuring Speeds Using a Piano Listen to these changes in pitch.  Pretend that the changes in pitch represent a Doppler shift for a moving vehicle.  Using this Virtual Piano or some other instrument, try to determine the number of half steps by which the pitches changed.  Contrary to how intervals are named in the context of music, count only the half steps that represent change.  Do not count the beginning and ending notes.
    Class 73 Thursday 5/18/17

    Warm-Up :  

    If you're standing next to a race track, what do you hear as the cars pass you?

    a.  Their pitch changes from high to low.

    b.  Their pitch changes from low to high.

    c.  There is no change in pitch.

     

     Today: 

    • Return Tests

    • Intro to the homework

    • Finish string instruments

    • Begin homework.

    Links:

    Reading:  

    Homework: 

    Class 72.5 Wednesday 5/17/17

    Warm-Up :   No warm-up today.  Website down.  Work on instruments.

     

     Today: 

    • Return Tests

    • Build string instruments

      • Clean up your mess.

      • Return tools to their proper locations.

      • Think before you cut or glue.

      • Keep track of your stuff.

      • Stay off of your phone.

      • Be safe.

      • String instrument directions

    • Confirm your fret spacing calculations using this spreadsheet

    Links:

    Reading:  

    Homework: 

    Class 72 Monday 5/15/17

    Warm-Up :   Look over the instrument tools and supplies.

     Today: 

    Links:

    Reading:  

    Homework: 

    Class 71.5 Friday 5/12/17

    Warm-Up :  

    1.  Identify any nodes and/or antinodes in this video of the "wave pool."

    2.  Which harmonic is this?  Could there be other harmonics?

    3.  What is the difference between resonance and forced vibrations?  Which one applies to the body of an instrument?

     Today: 

    Links:

    Reading:  

    Homework: 

    Class 71 Thursday 5/11/17

    Image result for piano keyboardWarm-Up :  

    As the keyboard shows, there are twelve different notes in western music. 

    1.  Why are there no black keys between B and C (and also E and F)?

    2.  What is the point of having the black keys?

    3.  Why are there two rows of keys?

    4.  What does western mean in this context?

     Today: 

    Links:

     

    Reading:  

    Homework: 

    Image result for lightning strike house hillClass 70.5 Wednesday 5/10/17

    Warm-Up :  

    If you see lightning strike a point 1 mile away, how long can you expect to wait before you hear thunder?

     Today: 

    Reading:  

    Homework: 

    Image result for cookie tinClass 70 Tuesday 5/9/17

    Warm-Up :  

    Test today.  No warm-up.  See homework, below.

     Today: 

    •  Test

    Reading:  

    Homework: 

    • Bring in a cookie tin or some other resonant chamber for creating the body of a string instrument.  We're going to make string instruments.  Maximum group size = 3.
    • You may want to bring in your own wood, strings, pickup, or other materials.  I plan to provide pine, fluorocarbon strings, bolts for tuners, and either wire or fluorocarbon for frets.
    Image result for cat bobbing in  waves gifClass 69.5 Monday 5/8/17

    Warm-Up :  

    What's wrong with this cat gif?

     Today: 

    Reading:  

    Homework: 

    • Prepare for test.
    Class 69 Friday 5/5/17

    Warm-Up :  

    Use Kirchoff's Rules to write three separate equations for the three labeled currents in the circuit on the right.

    Solution

     Today: 

    Reading:  

    Homework: 

    Class 68.5 Thursday 5/4/17

    Warm-Up :  

    1.  If we take a mental trip around loop A, starting and ending at the same point, what is the overall change in potential will we see?  What about loop B?

    2.  What is the numerical relationship between the currrents that meet at each of the junctions?

     Today: 

    • Kirchoff's Rules

    • Check and discuss practice test.

    Reading:  

    Homework: 

    Class 68 Wednesday 5/3/17

    Warm-Up :  

    The graph shows data collected using the same light bulb at a variety of voltages.

    1.  What does the slope of the curve represent?

    2.  Why are light bulbs considered to be "non-ohmic?"

    3.  Why do light bulbs behave in this way?

    4.  What is a kilowatt-hour? (This will be on the test, but we haven't discussed it much.)

     Today: 

    • Check/review homework.

    • Wrap-up and go over bulb circuit lab.

    • Optional:  Problem #2 of Ch 21 equivalent resistance challenge.  See class #67, below, for solutions.  If you have questions, see Mr. Stapleton or ask in class.

    • Work on practice test.  Before the test, we will work with Kirchoff's rules.  There will be at least one problem on the test requiring an application of Kirchoff's rules.  Test on Tuesday, 5/9.  The test will cover online text sections 20.1-20.4, 21.1, 21.3, and 21.4.

    Reading:  

    Homework: 

    Class 67.5 Tuesday 5/2/17

    Warm-Up :  

    No warm-up today

     Today: 

    Reading:  

    Homework: 

    Class 67 Monday 5/1/17

    Warm-Up :  

    What is the equivalent resistance between points A and B of the circuit on the right? 

     Today: 

    Reading:  

    Homework: 

    Image result for bird on a power lineClass 66.5 Friday 4/21/17

    Warm-Up :  

    Why doesn't a bird on an uninsulated power line get shocked.

     Today: 

    • Work time.  Try to turn in the homework by the end of class today.

    Reading:  

    Homework: 

    Image result for incandescent vs fluorescent how does it work?Class 66 Thursday 4/20/17

    Warm-Up :  

    1.  Of the bulbs on the right, why is the incandescent bulb the least efficient provider of light?

    2.  What does the incandescent bulb provide most efficiently?

    3.  Why does an electrified pickle light up on one end?  Is it always the same end?

    Electric pickle experiment data from Auburn.

    Hyperphysics electric pickle info

    4.  Why doesn't a bird on an uninsulated power line get shocked.

     Today:

    1. Grades are updated in PowerSchool.
    2. No new stuff tomorrow.  You will have class time to finish today's assignment.
    3. Notes:  20.3, 20.4, 21.1  Filled-in notes
    4. Practice: 20.3, 20.4, and 21.1  20.3Solutions   20.4Solutions   21.1Solutions

    Reading:  

    Homework: 

    Image result for sportdog electric shock dog collar electrodesClass 65.5 Wednesday 4/19/17

    Warm-Up :  

    1.  How many people can we shock at one time with this Sportdog electronic collar?

    2.  Can we use the classroom plumbing between sinks to complete a circuit?

     Today:

    1. Return tests
      1. Grades are not yet in PowerSchool.
      2. Test corrections for multiple choice must include an explanation in order to receive credit. 
      3. Extra credit for returned bearings will be added to this test.
      4. Solar power lecture extra credit will be added manually at the end of the quarter.  If you attended the lecture, there should be a comment about your extra credit in PowerSchool.
    2. Check/discuss homeworks (20.1 Solutions 20.2 Solutions)
    3. 20.3 Notes and Practice

    Reading:  

    Homework: 

    • None
    Class 65 Tuesday 4/18/17

    Warm-Up :  

    No Warm-up

     Today:

    1. Get 20.2 -- Notes and Practice
    2. Test
    3. Start homework

    Reading:  

    Homework: 

    • Read through Mr. Pennington's filled-in notes on Chapter 20.2.  Read Chapter 20.2  Complete 20.2 practice questions and problems.  20.2 -- Notes and Practice  Solutions
    • If you want a clearer understanding of Voltage (a.k.a. electric potential, or, simply, potential), read Chapter 19.1.
    Image result for simple generator diagramImage result for how does a battery workClass 64.5 Monday 4/17/17

    Warm-Up :  

    The pictures on the right show a battery, a generator, aVan de Graaff machine, and some capacitors.  Which one(s) can shock you Image result for van de graaffwithout you completing a circuit?

     Today: Image result for capacitor

    1. Questions about the test? 
    2. Check/discusss homework.  Practice: 20.1 Solutions
    3. Notes: 20.2 -- Ohms Law, Resistance and Simple Circuits Key
    4. Electrical shock and grounding

    Reading:  

    Homework: 

    • Prepare for the test.
    Image result for proton accelerating in an electric fieldClass 64 Friday 4/14/17

    Warm-Up :  

    Voltage : Potential Energy :: Electric Field : Force

    1.  The units for electric field are N/C.  According to the analogy above, what are the units for voltage?

    2.  Voltage is also known as electrical potential.  If we wanted to know how many Joules of PEE were stored in a charge at 3V of potential, what else would we need to know? 

    3.  There can also be gravitational potential.  If PEgrav = mgh, then gravitational potential = ______.  What would be the units for gravitational potential?

     

     Today:

    1. "4 Minute Drill"
    2. Questions about the test?  There will also be time on Monday for questions.
    3. Silly video -- "Brainacs" getting shocked by an electric fence.  Mythbusters peeing on the third rail of a railroad track.
    4. Notes:  20.1 -- Current Key
    5. Notes: 20.2 -- Ohms Law, Resistance and Simple Circuits Key

    Reading:  

    Homework: 

    Class 63.5 Thursday 4/13/17

    Warm-Up :  

    1.  In the diagram on the right, which charge is stronger?

    2.  How can you determine the relative strengths of the charges in the diagram?

     Today:

    1. Get Test Review
    2. Go over homeworks:  Electric Field Simulation, 18.5 Practice, 18.7 Practice

    Reading:  

    Homework: 

    • Look over the study guide.  If you have any questions, be prepared to ask them tomorrow in class.
    Class 62.5 Tuesday 4/11/17

    Warm-Up :   The nearest diagram on the right shows a uniform electric field.

    1.  In which direction would a negative charge accelerate if it were placed in this electric field?

    2.  Which of the other two diagrams correctly portrays a conductor placed in a previously uniform electric field?

     Today:

    1. Quizzes are graded.  Corrections and old tests/quizzes are not.
    2. I will record only quiz grades over 90% unless you give me other directions.
    3. Return Quizzes. Discuss answers.  If you really don't want to hear the answers, because you want to do corrections (or because you haven't taken the quiz), please leave the room while we go over the answers.
    4. Go over Homework.
    5. Notes: 18.7 -- Conductors and Fields in Static Equilibrium. Notes 18.7 Key

    Reading:  

    Homework: 

    Class 62 Monday 4/10/17

    Warm-Up :  

    1.  Why do John's electrons flow into the doorknob?

    2.  Why do his electrons keep flowing into the doorknob, no matter how many times he gets discharged?

     Today:

    1. Grades updated.  Return papers.
    2. Quiz
    3. Notes:  18.5 -- Electric Field Lines:   Multiple Charges  Notes: 18.5 -- Key
    4. Notes: 18.7 -- Conductors and Fields in Static Equilibrium. Notes 18.7 Key

    Reading:  

    Homework: 

    Class 61.5 Friday 4/7/17

    Warm-Up :  

    The two plates on the right are conductors.  The top plate has a net positive charge, and the bottom plate has a net negative charge.

    1.  In the vicinity of the plates, where is the electric field strongest?

    2.  What is the direction of the electric field?

    3.  How are the charges distributed within the plates?

     Today:

    1. Grades will be completed and entered by Monday.  Hopefully sooner.
    2. Look at some electric field lines.
    3. Check/discuss homework
    4. Quiz study guide Key to Travoltage and Balloon/sweater Simulations
    5. Notes 18.5 (Electric Field Lines).  Filled in Notes:   18.5 
    6. Simulation -- Electric Charges and Fields

    Reading:  

    Homework: 

    • Quiz next class.  You can drop it if you want.  If you drop the quiz and you have extra credit for returned bearings, an equivalent amount of extra credit will instead be added to your next test..
    Class 61 Thursday 4/6/17

    Warm-Up :  

    Coulomb's law (snipped from the textbook) is stated on the right. 

    1.  Why is there an absolute value symbol?

    2.  What happens to the forces exerted on two charges by one another if one of the charges doubles?

    3.  What if both of the charges double?

    4.  What if the distance between them doubles?

     Today:

    1. Check/discuss homework
    2. Notes 18.4 (Electric Field) -18.5 (Electric Field Lines).  Filled in Notes:  18.4   18.5 
    3. Simulation -- Electric Charges and Fields
    4. Extra credit for bearing return or extra-special cars.  Ask for details.
    5. Clean up/sort car stuff.  Disassemble unwanted cars.  Either present your car and explain that you are going to keep it or present your bearings.  Get checked off.

    Reading:  

    Homework: 

    Class 60.5 Wednesday 4/5/17

    Warm-Up :  

    Figure B on the right shows the distribution of excess charge on an isolated positively charged conductor with an irregular shape. 

    1.  Why does excess charge move to the outside surface of a conductor?

    2.  In diagram B, it looks like excess positive charges moved to the outside of the conductor.  Why can't this happen?  What really happened?

    3.  Why aren't the charges evenly distributed?  Why are they closest at the pointiest parts of the object?

     Today:

    1. B8 -- watch static fire video.
    2. Check/discuss homework. Ch 18.2 practice solutions Key to Travoltage and Balloon/sweater Simulations
    3. Ch. 18.3 Notes -- Coulomb's Law key
    4. Clean up/sort car stuff.  Disassemble unwanted cars.  Either present your car and explain that you are going to keep it or present your bearings.  Get checked off.

    Reading:  

    Homework: 

    Image result for argon periodic table squareImage result for argon atomClass 60 Tuesday 4/4/17

    Warm-Up :  

    1.  How many electrons are there in 80g of Argon atoms?

    2.  How would you calculate the total charge of that many electrons?

    3.  What is an electrical ground?Image result for electrical ground

     Today:

    1. Check/discuss homework.  Video clip:  Frog legs dancing with a little salt.
    2. Notes 18.2  Conductors and Insulators  Key to notes
    3. VDG (Pith ball, pie pans pencil, field indicator and unreliability of triboelectric series) and Electrophorus demos of charging by induction.  [Green indicator light means approaching increasing electric field, approaching positive charge.]
    4. Clean up/sort car stuff.  Disassemble unwanted cars.  Either present your car and explain that you are going to keep it or present your bearings.  Get checked off.
    5.  Good explanation of how the classroom Van de Graaff Generator works -- but backward relative to our classroom VDG.

    Reading:  

    Homework: 

    Class 59.5 Monday 4/3/17

    Warm-Up :  

    1.  If you rub a balloon on your head and then hold it next to your hair, your hair is attracted to the balloon.  Why?

    2.  Your hair may also stand on end after being rubbed by a balloon.  Why?

    3.  The balloon may stick to the wall or ceiling.  Why?

    4.  This all works better in drier air.  Why?

     Today:

    Reading:  

    Homework:  Chapter 18.1 Practice  -- Static Electricity and Charge  Solutions

    Class 59 Friday 3/31/17

    Warm-Up :  

    To wind up the car on the right, a string is hooked on a tab on one of the stair-step radii of the large chain ring, and the wheels are rotated backward until the rubber bands almost reach the chain ring.

    1.  What is the purpose of the chain?

    2.  What is the purpose of the stair-step design of the front chain ring?

    3.  What advantage(s) does using a string confer?

    4.  Sum up the guiding principle that was followed in order to design a car that would go as fast as possible.

    5.  Why wouldn't the car go as fast if the string was merely wrapped around the bare axle, with the same amount of rubber band stretch?

     Today:

    • Last day of car project work
    •  Project Stuff relating to Rhino -- Rhino information, files, etc.
    • Slideshows should be finished and shared with Mr. Stapleton before the end of school on Friday.  If your isn't ready to be graded, insert a new slide at the very beginning that says something like "not finished! Please do not grade!".  If you do not finish this on Friday, do not expect fast grading turnaround time.

    Reading:  

    Homework: 

    1. Chapter 18 Reading
    2. Finish slideshow.  If you don't finish by the end of school on Friday, insert a slide at the beginning that says "Not finished. Do not grade."  Then, when your slideshow is finished, email me to let me know.
    3. Document your car's success in one of the following ways:
      1. Have me watch your car jump to the string or beyond.
      2. Show me a video of your car jumping to the string or beyond.
      3. Share an uploaded video showing your car reaching or surpassing 3.4m/s.  Include your calculations of your car's top speed.
    Class 58.5 Thursday 3/30/17

    Warm-Up :  

    The speed required to jump 1m is 3.4m/s.  A car is videoed at a frame rate of 240 frames per second.  If the car passes over a floor tile (0.305m) in 21 frames, has its speed reached 3.4m/s?

     Today:

    • Return Tests
    • Test cars.
    •  Project Stuff relating to Rhino -- Rhino information, files, etc.
    • Slideshows should be finished and shared with Mr. Stapleton before the end of school on Friday.  If your isn't ready to be graded, insert a new slide at the very beginning that says something like "not finished! Please do not grade!".  If you do not finish this on Friday, do not expect fast grading turnaround time.

    Reading:  None

    Homework: 

    1. Finish slideshow.  If you don't finish by the end of school on Friday, insert a slide at the beginning that says "Not finished. Do not grade."  Then, when your slideshow is finished, email me to let me know.
    2. Document your car's success in one of the following ways:
      1. Have me watch your car jump to the string or beyond.
      2. Show me a video of your car jumping to the string or beyond.
      3. Share an uploaded video showing your car reaching or surpassing 3.4m/s.  Include your calculations of your car's top speed.
    Class 58 Wednesday 3/29/17

    Warm-Up :  

    No warm-up today

     Today:

    • Test.
    • Silent car work time.   Project Stuff relating to Rhino -- Rhino information, files, etc.
    • Slideshows should be finished and shared with Mr. Stapleton before the end of school on Friday.  If your isn't ready to be graded, insert a new slide at the very beginning that says something like "not finished! Please do not grade!"

    Reading:  None

    Homework: 

    • Slideshow
    Image result for dry limbs firewood driftwoodClass 57 Monday 3/27/17

    Warm-Up :  

    Suppose you need to want to build a camp fire.  You have plenty of dry wood, but it's all big limbs that are too long to be manageable, and too thick to break over your knee.  Without using a saw or an axe, what's the best way to divide wood into smaller pieces?  Can you describe the proper technique?  One solution.

     Today:

    • Check for completion of test reviews.
    • Questions about the test on Wednesday?  It will be similar to the two test reviews.  You will be given the formulas that were listed on the first test review.
    • Car work time
    • Updated Schedule
    • Work on cars.   Project Stuff relating to Rhino -- Rhino information, files, etc.
    • Slideshows should be finished before the end of school on Friday.

    Reading:  None

    Homework: 

    • Study for test on Wednesday.
    Class 56.5 Friday 3/24/17

    Warm-Up :  

    No warm-up.  Work on cars. 

     Today:

    • Announcements:
      • Spacers are in a manilla (?) envelope.
      • Don't forget to keep updating your slideshow as your car progresses.  If you don't, you may realize that you don't have the materials or files that you need for your slides.
      • You really should complete the test review, check your answers, and watch the necessary videos before Monday.  Monday is for asking about parts of the review that were unclear in the videos.
      • Car Project Final Days:
        • You may work on cars today, on Monday (unless you're involved in test review), Wednesday after the test, and a little bit on Thursday. 
        • Thursday is going to be the official testing day for the cars. 
        • Slideshows are due on Friday.
        • You may keep improving your car outside of class time.  Improved car performance can raise your grade accordingly.
      • If I have time, I will laser cut some more cars.  If you want me to do this, send me your completed file with a clear explanation of what you need.  I will cut cars in the order recieved in each class.
    • Updated Schedule
    • Work on cars.   Project Stuff relating to Rhino -- Rhino information, files, etc.
    • Slides 7 and 8 should be complete by today.

    Reading:  None

    Homework: 

    Class 56 Thursday 3/23/17

    Warm-Up :  

    No warm-up.  Work on cars. 

     Today:

    Reading:  None

    Homework: 

    Class 55.5 Wednesday 3/22/17

    Warm-Up :  

    1.  The table on the right lists analogous linear and angular measurements.  Fill in the boxes witht the right measurements.

    2.  For which of the measurements on the right can you perform a simple conversion from the linear to the angular form, or vice versa?

    3.  For those measurements, what is the conversion?

     

     

     

     Today:

    Reading:  None

    Homework: 

    Class 54.5 Monday 3/20/17

    Warm-Up :  

    1.   In Rhino, how do you create a D-shaped hole in a wheel?

    2.  The second picture on the right shows a light grey wheel, a dark grey car frame, a green and pink bearing, and a yellow spacer.  What is the purpose of the spacer?  Why was that particular radius chosen for the spacer?

     Today:

    • Scheduling Update:
      • SBAC makeup will be on Tuesday, 3/28.  We will not have the car competition that day. 
      • Rotational Motion Test will still be on Wednesday, 3/29.
      • Car competition will be moved to Thursday, 3/30.
      • Car slideshows will be due by the beginning of class on Friday, 3/31.
    • Hand out Spring Car Problems Part 3
    • Work on cars.   Project Stuff relating to Rhino -- Rhino information, files, etc.
    • If you have a file that is ready to laser cut, but you don't have time to cut it yourself, email it to me and specify the material.  I might be able to cut it before next class.

    Reading:  None

    Homework: 

    • Complete slides 5 and 6.
    • Complete Spring Car Problems Part 3.   Check your answer (Solution).  If you have questions, watch the video ( Link to Video).  If you still have questions, ask them in class on Wednesday.
    • If you need help scaling up your car, send a file of your assembled car to Mr. Stapleton and explain what you need.
    Class 54 Friday 3/17/17

    Warm-Up :  

    Suppose you need three squares of toilet paper, and one of your hands is unavailable.

    1.  What strategy might you use to tear off only three squares?

    2.  Why is this task easier with a nearly-full roll?

     Today:

    Reading:  None

    Homework: 

    • Due on Tuesday -- complete slideshow slides 1-4.   Most of you should be able to complete slide 5, and possibly slide 6.
    Class 53.5 Thursday 3/16/17

    Warm-Up :  

    No warm-up today

     Today:

    • Tomorrow we will go over the homework that was due today and tonight's homework.
    • Work on cars.   Project Stuff relating to Rhino -- Rhino information, files, etc.

    Reading:  None

    Homework: 

    Class 53 Monday 3/13/17

    Warm-Up :  

    1. What is the function of the steel spheres in this bearing?

    2. A bearing reduces friction, but it is not frictionless.  What are the sources of friction in this bearing?  

    3. If the inner ring has an outer diameter of X, and the spheres have radii of X/2, exactly how many revolutions do the spheres make for every rotation of the inner ring (assuming that the outer ring remains motionless)? 

    4.  How many revolutions do the spheres make if the outer ring makes one rotation and the inner ring stays still?

    5.  What if each ring (outer and inner) makes 1 rotation, but in an opposite direction?

     Today:

    Reading:  None

    Homework: 

    Class 52.5 Friday 3/10/17

    Warm-Up :  

    The picture on the right shows one of the elasticar bearings. 
    1.  Which part(s) of the bearing should touch the frame of your car?
    2.  Which part(s) of the bearing should touch your car's axle?
    3.  Which parts can touch your wheel?
    4.  For a non-drive axle, your answers to 1-3 could be different.  Explain.

     Today:

    Reading:  None

    Homework: 

    Image result for wheels spinning outClass 52 Thursday 3/9/17

    Warm-Up :   Suppose your rubber band car doesn't have enough traction.  The wheels are spinning out. 

    1.  What is the root of the problem?

    2.  What are some ways to prevent your wheels from slipping?

    3.  Do your solutions have costs?  If so, what are they?

     Today:

    Reading:  None

    Homework: 

    Class 51.5 Wednesday 3/8/17

    Warm-Up :  

    1.  A dirt bike rider goes off a jump at a speed of 30mph.  In mid-air, the rider hits the brakes, stopping the tires' rotation.  What effect does this braking have on the whole motorcycle?

    2.  If I roll a roll of tape away from me with the tilt shown in the photo, what will happen?  Why?

     Today:

    Reading:  None

    Homework: 

    Class 51 Thursday 2/24/17

    Warm-Up :  

    The bicycle tire in the picture on the right has two motions; it is rotating around its axle, and it is precessing around an axis alont the rope's length.  Why does it precess in one particular direction?

     Today:

    Reading:  None

    Homework:Prepare for a quiz (Thursday after break) over the laser cutter rules and produres.

    Image result for quadcopter controlsImage result for quadcopterClass 50.5 Thursday 2/23/17

    Warm-Up :  

    1. A quadcopter has four propellers.  Why do the propellers alternate in their directions of rotation?
    2. How does a quadcopter achieve a yaw (rotation around a vertical axis) without also rising or sinking?  How does this work?
    3. How does a stationary quadcopter begin to fly forward?  Why does this work?

     Today:

    Reading:  None

    Homework:  Think about your car design.

    Class 50 Wednesday 2/22/17

    Warm-Up :  

    1. How do falling cats always manage to land on their feet?
    2. Why do falling people flail their arms around?

     Today:

    Reading:

    Homework:  Complete the problems in Notes and Practice -- Ch. 10.5: Angular Momentum

    Class 49.5 Tuesday 2/21/17

    Warm-Up :  

    1. How fast is the world record figure skating spin, in rpm?
    2. During the spin, do you suspect that the skater's angular momentum is increasing, decreasing, or staying the same?
    3. What about the skater's rotational KE?

     Today:

    Reading:

    • Chapter 10.4:  Rotational KE -- work and energy revisited

    Homework: 

    Class 49 Monday 2/20/17

    Warm-Up :   A sphere, a cylinder, a ring, and a frictionless box are released from rest at the top of ramp.

    1.  Consider the changes in the objects' KE and PE during the trip down the ramp.

    2.  Rank the objects according to their arrival times at the bottom of the ramp.

    3.  The round objects are affected by friction.  Would the result be different in a totally frictionless situation?  Explain.

     Today:

    Reading:

    • Chapter 10.4:  Rotational KE -- work and energy revisited

    Homework: 

    Class 48.5 Friday 2/17/17

    Warm-Up :   Starting from rest, the wheel and the axle shown on the right are rotated by a falling weight that is tied to a string.  The string is wrapped around the axle, and the axle and the wheel are fused together.

    How could you find the moment of inertia (I) of the wheel and axle?  What materials would you need?

     Today:

    1. Check/discuss homework.  10-3 Rotational Inertia Practice  Rotational Inertia practice Solutions
    2. Laser cut boxes?
    3. Car groups.  Do we have an uneven number?
    4. Begin car design work.  Car Project Outline

    Reading:

    Homework: 

    • Think about your car design.  Brainstorm and begin 2-D sketches (pencil and paper).
    Class 48 Wednesday 2/16/17

    Warm-Up :   What purpose(s) do the pulleys of a compound bow serve?

    Image result for compound bow drawn

     Today:

    1. Rotational Inertia Notes:  10-3 Rotational Inertia Notes (Pennington) Rotational Inertia Notes Key.  Then complete the practice problems.  10-3 Rotational Inertia Practice  Rotational Inertia practice Solutions
    2. Prepare boxes for laser cutting.  Box directions PDF
    3. Begin car design work.  Car Project Outline -- tentative

    Reading:

    Homework: 

    Image result for carry skisClass 47.5 Wednesday 2/15/17

    Warm-Up :  

    Why is it easier to carry skis at a tilt (as shown on the right), rather than keeping them horizontal?

     Today:

    1. Check/discuss homework. Torque Practice (Pennington)   Torque Practice Solutions
    2. Rotational Inertia Notes:  10-3 Rotational Inertia Notes (Pennington) Rotational Inertia Notes Key.  Then complete the practice problems.  10-3 Rotational Inertia Practice  Rotational Inertia practice Solutions
    3. Tomorrow (or Friday, if there's a snow day tomorrow) -- meet in library computer lab.
      1. prepare boxes for laser cutting. 
      2. Work on car design.

    Reading:

    Homework: 

    • None
    Class 47 Tuesday 2/14/17

    Warm-Up :   Assuming equal coefficients of friction, will one of the two ski jumps, on the right, will result in the jumper traveling a greater distance?  If so, which one?  Explain your reasoning.

     Today:

    1.  Fill in Torque Notes (Pennington) .  A7/8, complete the notes using this Torque Notes Key
    2. Complete Torque Practice (Pennington)   Torque Practice Solutions
    3. Do you need to finish your box?  If so, you can finish it on a classroom computer.
    4. If you want to get ahead... fill in 10-3 Rotational Inertia Notes (Pennington) Rotational Inertia Notes Key.  Then complete the practice problems.  10-3 Rotational Inertia Practice  Rotational Inertia practice Solutions

    Reading:

    Homework: 

    Class 46 Friday 2/10/17

    Warm-Up :   What is the mass of the balanced bar on the right?

     Today:

    Reading:

    Homework: 

    Class 45.7 Thursday 2/9/17

    Warm-Up :  

    Torque = Force x Radius.

    Using the shorter wrench, a 40N force must be applied 15cm from the nut's center in order to loosen the nut.

    1.  How much torque is required to loosen the nut?

    2.  How much force must be applied in order to loosen the nut using the longer wrench?  (assuming the force is applied at a distance of 30cm from the nut's center)

     Today:

    Reading:

    Homework:  Optional torque problem

     

    Class 47 Wednesday 2/8/17

    Warm-Up :  

    1. What does a differential do?

    2.  How does a differential work?

     Today:

    • Check/discuss homework Solutions to p1-2
    • Design a laser-cut "dovetail" cardboard box.  There must be at least two jogs in every edge of the box.  Cardboard thickness is 0.13 inches.  The longest box dimension should be 2".  You might want to make a puzzle cube.  You may use any CAD software, but I will show you how to use Rhino.
    • 7/8 --Solution to extra credit problem -- radius of the loop?
    •   Rotational Dynamics PowerPoint

    Reading:

    Homework: 

    • Complete "practice problems with angular acceleration, continued" (#6, 7, and 16-19)   Solutions to p3
    Class 46.5 Tuesday 2/7/17

    Warm-Up :  

    Can you guess the difference between centripetal acceleration and tangential acceleration?

     Today:

    Reading:

    Homework: 

    Related imageClass 46 Monday 2/4/17

    Warm-Up : 

    1.  True or false:  as long as you are not experiencing a normal force, you feel weightless.

    2.  Why?  What causes the sensation of weight?

    3.  Write a formula for the acceleration that you feel.

     Today:

    Reading:

    Homework: 

    • Reading, above. 
    Class 45.5 Friday 2/4/17

    Warm-Up :  Practice with radians

    1.  360º = _____ radians

    2.  90º = _____ radians

    3.  2 radians = _____ degrees

     Today:

    • Check/discuss  13-18 of Quiz review Practice -- Circular Motion, Gravitation, Kepler Solutions
    • Try out Rhino on the classroom computers.  Begin designing a "dovetail" cardboard box.  There must be at least two jogs in every edge of the box.  Cardboard thickness is 0.13 inches.  The longest box dimension should be 2".  You might want to make a puzzle cube.  You may use any CAD software, but I will show you how to use Rhino.

    After Monday's quiz:

    Reading:

    Homework: 

    • Prepare for quiz.
    • Rhino is on the library computers, in case you want to work on CAD design outside of class.
    Class 45 Thursday 2/2/17

    Warm-Up : 

    In several of the problems you have encountered, a car travels around a loop-the-loop at a constant speed. 

    1.  For this situation, sketch (or visualize) the individual forces acting on the car at points A, B, C, and D.

    2.  Is this a realistic problem? 

    3. In the video on the right, why do they say the driver experiences 6g's when he enter's the loop at the minimum speed?

     Today:

    Reading:

    Homework: 

    Class 44.5 Wednesday 2/1/17

    Warm-Up : 

    1.  What is a geosynchronous satellite?

    2.  What's the difference between a geosynchronous orbit and a geostationary orbit?

     Today:

    Reading:

    Homework: 

    Class 44 Tuesday 1/31/17

    Warm-Up : 

    1.  How does this yo-yo work? What do the springs and steel balls do?

    2. A yo-yo spins as it goes down and up.  At what point in its travel does it spin fastest?

    3.  If you graphed the velocity of a yo-yo, would it look like this?

     Today:

    Class 43.67 Monday 1/30/17

    Warm-Up : 

    Two flight paths are shown for objects in free-fall.  How are they different?  Why?  Should they be different?

     Today:

    Reading:

    Homework: 

    Class 43.33 Thursday 1/26/17

    Warm-Up : From last year's EPS 200 class...

    The Sun, Earth, and Moon are continually spaghettifying one another.  We see the effects of this spaghettification in the form of tides.

    1.  What causes spaghettification and tides?

    2.  How much gravitational force do the Sun and Moon each exert on 1,000,000 pounds of water?

    3.  Is the Earth's 24 hour rotational period speeding up or slowing down over time?  Explain. Answer

    Good source of information about tides

     

     Today:

    Reading:

    Homework:  

    Class 43 Wednesday 1/18/17

    Warm-Up : 

    1.  What normal force is acting on the box?

    2.  What is the acceleration of the box?

     Today:

    Homework:  

    • Tomorrow is our last chance to review.  Bring any questions or problems that you would like to review.
    • If you want to turn in your review packets for credit, turn them in with your exam and your formula sheet on exam day.
    Image result for roundabout top viewClass 42.5 Tuesday 1/17/17

    Warm-Up : 

    A 1,000kg car drives in a counter-clockwise (when viewed from above) circle at a constant speed of 20m/s.  If the circle's radius is 10m...

    a.  What is the car's acceleration?  (magnitude and direction)

    b.  What is the net force acting on the car? (magnitude and direction)

     Today:

    Homework:  

    • Tomorrow is our last chance to review.  Bring any questions or problems that you would like to review.
    • If you want to turn in your review packets for credit, turn them in with your exam and your formula sheet on exam day.
    Class 42 Thursday 1/12/17

    Warm-Up : 

    Assuming g=10m/s2, what was the initial speed of a horizontally-launched projectile that fell 80m and traveled 120m horizontally before hitting the ground?

     Today:

    Homework:  

    • Begin work on creating your own formula sheet for use on the midterm.  Formula sheet restrictions:
      • Limited to 2 sides of one 8.5"x11" sheet of paper
      • Handwritten
      • If you use a formula sheet, it must be turned in with your exam
      • Formulas only
    • Exam review Packets:
    Class 41.5 Thursday 1/12/17

    Warm-Up : 

    There is friction between the 4kg mass and the surface.  The 1kg mass is accelerating downward at a rate of 1m/s2.

    If g=10m/s2, what is the tension in the string?

     Today:

    Homework:  

    • Begin work on creating your own formula sheet for use on the midterm.  Formula sheet restrictions:
      • Limited to 2 sides of one 8.5"x11" sheet of paper
      • Handwritten
      • If you use a formula sheet, it must be turned in with your exam
      • Formulas only
    • Exam review Packets:
    Class 41 Wednesday 1/11/17

    Warm-Up : 

    Can anyone open the YOT?  Please do not hit or force the YOT.

     Today:

    • Return Quizzes.  Discuss the point value changes.  Some students need to take the quiz.
    • Go over homework.
    • Work on Kinematics Review Packet
    • Next class -- get forces review packet. 

    Homework:  

    • Begin work on creating your own formula sheet for use on the midterm.  Formula sheet restrictions:
      • Limited to 2 sides of one 8.5"x11" sheet of paper
      • Handwritten
      • If you use a formula sheet, it must be turned in with your exam
      • Formulas only
    • Midterm Review Packet 1-- Kinematics (including Mr. Pennington's multiple choice and Mr. Chase's problems)  Answers/solutions to Kinematics Packet
    Class 40.5 Tuesday 1/10/17

    Class at the rink

    Image result for space station gravity rotationClass 40 Monday 1/9/17

    Warm-Up : 

    Suppose we were in a circular space station roughly the size of this classroom (10m in diameter).  How fast would the station need to rotate in order to simulate 1g at the outer edge?  Answer in m/s (at the outer edge) and rpm.

     Today:

    Recommended Reading: 

    Homework:  

    Class 39.5 Friday 1/6/17

    Warm-Up : 

    A bucket containing a 1kg skunk is swung in a circle with a constant speed of 4m/s.  The radius of the swing is 1m.

    1.  The skunk stays in the bucket, even at the top of the swing.  Why?

    2.  What is the skunk's centripetal acceleration?

    3.  What force does the skunk feel at the top of the swing?

    4.  What force does the skunk feel at the bottom of the swing?

    5.  What happens to the skunk's weight as it orbits from top to bottom and back?

    6.  What happens to the net force acting on the skunk as the skunk orbits from top to bottom and back?

     Today:

    Recommended Reading: 

    Homework:  

    • Read Chapter 6-6.3
    • Prepare for quiz on Monday.
    Class 39 Thursday 1/5/17

    Warm-Up : 

    Renault Modus (compact car) vs. Volvo wagon in a head-on crash. 

    1.  What happens?

    2.  Which is safer, a car that crumples in a crash or a car that is more rigid?

     Today:

    Recommended Reading: 

    Homework:  

    • Read Chapter 6-6.3
    • Prepare for quiz on Monday.
    Class 38.5 Wednesday 1/4/17

    Warm-Up : 

    1.  What's interesting about a Newton's Cradle?

    2.  What concepts does a Newton's Cradle demonstrate?

    3.  What is the coefficient of restitution for a Newton's Cradle?

     Today:

    • Check/review homework.
    • Momentum/Impulse PowerPoint
    • Updated End of Semester Plan:
      • Thursday (1/5, A) -- review homework, quiz preview, begin gravity & circular motion
      • Friday (1/6, B) -- Gravity& circular motion
      • Monday (1/9, A) -- Momentum Quiz, Gravity& circular motion
      • Tuesday (1/10, B) -- Finish Gravity& circular motion
      • Wednesday (1/11) Through Tuesday (1/17)  -- 5 Individual review packets.  One per day.  Final packet due on 1/17.
      • Wed (1/18, A) -- Last review

    Homework:  

    Class 38 Tuesday 1/3/17

    Warm-Up : 

    In the system shown on the right, the effects of air resistance and string friction are negligible...

    1.  When is energy conserved?  Why?

    2.  When is momentum conserved?  Why?

     Today:

    Homework:  

    Image result for santa sleigh accelerationImage result for Earth from north pole with international date lineClass 37.5 Thursday 12/22/16

    Warm-Up : 

    Assuming that Santa must deliver all presents between 6PM on December 24th and 6AM on the 25th, for how many hours can he deliver presents?  Should he generally travel an eastward or a westward route?

     Today:

    Homework:  

    • None
    Source: Project GutenbergClass 37 Wednesday 12/21/16

    Warm-Up : 

    Before radar guns, slow motion cameras, and accurate timers were invented, a cannon ball's muzzle velocity was calculated using a ballistic pendulum, like the one on the right.  A cannon ball of known mass was fired into a pendulum of known mass, where it embedded (got stuck) and caused the pendulum to swing to some height.  From these two masses and the swing height the ball's velocity could be found.

    1.  Was the collision between the cannon ball and the pendulum elastic or inelastic?

    2.  What does that mean?

     Today:

    • Return old papers.
    • Check/review homework.
    • Shoot a sheet of paper into a ballistic pendulum. Measure the projectile's velocity.  Ballistic Pendulum Handout
    • Tomorrow's short class: Short analysis, Party?  Games?  Toys?  Song?

    Links:  Read Chapter 8 Intro through 8.3 (conservation of momentum)

    Homework:  

    • Finish ballistic pendulum calculations, if you didn't finish in class.
    Class 36.5 Tuesday 12/20/16

    Warm-Up : 

    Suppose I stand a board on end and shoot it with a Nerf ® dart.  Am I more likely to knock the board over if I use a dart that sticks to the board or if I use a dart that bounces off of the board?

     Today:

    Links:  Read Chapter 8 Intro through 8.3 (conservation of momentum)

     

    Homework:  

    Class 36 Monday 12/19/16

    Warm-Up : 

    The toy on the right is called an AstroBlaster.  It consists of bouncy spheres threaded onto a rod.  The whole contraption is dangled vertically and then dropped so that the large sphere hits the ground.  What happens then?  Why?

     Today:

    Links:  Read Chapter 8 Intro through 8.3 (conservation of momentum)

     

    Homework:  

    Image result for towelClass 35.5 Friday 12/16/16

    Warm-Up : 

    1.  How does a whip work?

    2.  How can a towel be like a whip?

     Today:

    • Return Tests
    • Learn to tie a Trucker's Hitch and explain its merits.  How fast can you tie it?
      • Bowline:        Slippery Half Hitch:        Slip knot:        How to secure a box with a Trucker's Hitch:

    Homework:  

    Class 35 Thursday 12/14/16

    Warm-Up : 

    No warm-up today.

     Today:

    • I need to know all of the students where in these egg bungee groups, so that I can award extra points:
      • 1st Place:  Sam Feehan:  0cm.
      • 2nd Place:  Dakota Allen:  1cm
      • 3rd Place:  Connor Charland: 1.5cm*
    • Test
    • Learn to tie a Trucker's Hitch.

    Homework:  

    Class 34.5 Wednesday 12/13/16

    Warm-Up : 

    In either case on the right, if the weight is 10N, how much force must be applied to rope to lift the weight?  Why? (Ignore the masses of the pulleys and rope, and assume 100% efficiency.)

     Today:

    Homework:  

    • Study.  Test tomorrow.
    Class 34 Tuesday 12/13/16

    Warm-Up : 

    Two identical springs have a spring constant k = 100N/m.  The two springs can be arranged in series (Fig. A) or parallel (Fig. B).  If a 10N weight is added to the end springs, released, and allowed to come to rest...

    1. How far would the weight stretch one of the springs alone?

    2.  How far would the weight stretch the two springs arranged in series?

    3.  How far would the weight stretch the two springs in parallel?

    4.  What single spring constant could be used for the assembly of springs in series?  How about the parallel springs?

     Today:

    Homework:  

    • Complete test review.
    Image result for wedge mechanical advantageImage result for hockey stick fulcrumImage result for boat winchClass 33.5  Monday 12/12/16

    Warm-Up : 

    The pictures on the right all show simple machines.  Simple machines change the nature of work to help people accomplish tasks.  W = Fd. 

    1.  Identify the task in each picture.

    2.  For each picture, identify the machine (s).

    3.  For each machine, tell how the machine alters the distance over which force must be applied by the human using the machine.

    4.  How does the machine alter the force that the human must apply?

     Today:

    Homework:  

    Class 33  Friday 12/9/16

    Warm-Up : 

    In problem 3 of last night's homework, a 50g object was attached to the bottom of a spring and released.  After bobbing up and down for a bit, the object came to rest 20cm below its original position.  Problem 3.b. asked for the spring constant.  Which of the solutions below is correct?  Why?

    Solution #1:

    PEspring = PElost by object = mgh = (0.05kg)(9.8m/s2)(0.2m) = 0.098J

    PEspring=1/2 kx2, so 0.098J = 0.5(k)(0.2)2.  Thus k = 4.9N/m

    Solution #2:

    Weight of object = Fspring = kx.  So, mg = kx  or (0.05kg)(9.8m/s2) = k(0.2m).  Thus k = 2.45N/m

     Today:

    Online Textbook (OpenStax) Reading: 

    Homework:  

    Class 32.5  Thursday 12/8/16

    Warm-Up : 

    Suppose a screen door spring has a spring constant k = 40N/m.

    1.  What maximum force is required to stretch the spring a distance of 1m?

    2.  Why was the word "maximum" added to the previous question?

    3.  What force is required to stretch the spring a distance of 20cm?

    4.  How much work is required to stretch the spring a distance of 1m?

    5.  How much work is required to stretch a spring x meters if its spring constant is k?

    6.  How much potential energy is stored in that spring?

     

     Today:

    Online Textbook (OpenStax) Reading: 

    Links:  Experiment with the Phet Skate Park Simulation.  Experiment with different graphs, friction, locations, and positions.  Build new tracks.  Does heat only appear when you enable friction?

    Homework:  

    Class 32  Wednesday 12/7/16

    Warm-Up :  No warm-up today

     Today:

    Online Textbook (OpenStax) Reading: 

    Links:  Experiment with the Phet Skate Park Simulation.  Experiment with different graphs, friction, locations, and positions.  Build new tracks.  Does heat only appear when you enable friction?

    Homework:  

    • Due on Thursday:  Bungee jump homework problem.  Estimate a spring constant for the bungee.  Create force and energy graphs.  Determine the distance fallen when the dropped 150g object reaches its low point.  Turn in a hard copy or share your document.  If you share the document, include the answers in a note or email.
    Class 31.5  Tuesday 12/6/16

    Warm-Up : 

    A trebuchet is powered by a 500kg mass that falls a distance of 3m.  If the trebuchet fires a 5kg bowling ball with 50% efficiency, what velocity will the bowling ball have when it leaves the trebuchet?

    What is "% efficiency?"

     Today:

    Online Textbook (OpenStax) Reading: 

    Links:  Experiment with the Phet Skate Park Simulation.  Experiment with different graphs, friction, locations, and positions.  Build new tracks.  Does heat only appear when you enable friction?

    Homework:  

    • Due on Thursday:  Bungee jump homework problem.  Estimate a spring constant for the bungee.  Create force and energy graphs.  Determine the distance fallen when the dropped 150g object will reach its low point.  Turn in a hard copy or share your document.  If you share the document, include the answers in a note or email.
    Class 31  Monday 12/5/16

    Warm-Up : 

    Calculate the work done according to each of the graphs.

     Today:

    Online Textbook (OpenStax) Reading: 

    Links:  Experiment with the Phet Skate Park Simulation.  Experiment with different graphs, friction, locations, and positions.  Build new tracks.  Does heat only appear when you enable friction?

    Homework:  

    Class 30.5  Friday 12/2/16

    Warm-Up : 

    What do you see when you suspend a Slinky, let it gravity stretch it out, release it, and capture the footage in slow motion? Why?

    1st Video

    2nd video

    Supersized Slinky

    one answer

     Today:

    • Check/Review Homework:  Energy and Work practice questions
    • Experiment with the Phet Skate Park Simulation.  Experiment with different graphs, friction, locations, and positions.  Build new tracks.  Does heat only appear when you enable friction?

    Online Textbook (OpenStax) Reading: 

    Links:  

    • Water Rocket Simulator.  There are others available online.  If you use it, enter 90psi air pressure as "90p"

    Homework:  

    Image result for car skidding to a stopClass 30  Thursday 12/1/16

    Warm-Up : 

    If you need to stop a car quickly, why shouldn't you slam on the brakes and "lock" the tires?  Why is it better to apply gentle pressure or pump the brakes?  The same reasoning applies when you are simply trying to stop normally on a slick surface, such as ice.

     Today:

    Online Textbook (OpenStax) Reading: 

    Links:  

    • Water Rocket Simulator.  There are others available online.  If you use it, enter 90psi air pressure as "90p"

    Homework:  

    • Turnin your water rocket analysis and share your completed spreadsheet as soon as you can.  I won't take points off for lateness, but you won't have a grade until you get it in.
    • Complete the "work and energy practice problems" in Energy and Work
    Class 29.5  Wednesday 11/30/16

    Warm-Up : 

    How are g-forces dangerous to pilots?

     Today:

    Online Textbook (OpenStax) Reading: 

    Links:  

    • Water Rocket Simulator.  There are others available online.  If you use it, enter 90psi air pressure as "90p"

    Homework:  

    • Complete the Water Rocket Analysis by Tomorrow.
    • Complete and share the drag spreadsheet with Mr. Stapleton.
    • Read Chapter 7 introduction, section 7.1, and section 7.2.
    Class 29  Tuesday 11/29/16

    Warm-Up : 

    The circled data on the right correspond to the bottom two data points in the photograph.

    1.  Which data are incorrect; the time data, the position data or the velocity data?  How do you know?  Why are they incorrect?

    2.  What is the best way to calculate the rocket's acceleration during this phase?

    3.  Is Logger Pro rounding the time data?

     Today:

    Online Textbook (OpenStax) Reading: 

    Links:  

    • Water Rocket Simulator.  There are others available online.  If you use it, enter 90psi air pressure as "90p"

    Homework:  

    • Complete the Water Rocket Analysis by Thursday.
    • Read Chapter 7 introduction, section 7.1, and section 7.2.
    Class 28.5  Monday 11/28/16

    Warm-Up : 

    How many 100 psi water bottles would it take to launch a human?

     Today:

    Online Textbook (OpenStax) Reading: 

    Links:  

    • Water Rocket Simulator.  There are others available online.  If you use it, enter 90psi air pressure as "90p"

    Homework:  Complete the Water Rocket Analysis by Wednesday.

     

    Class 28  Friday 11/18/16

    Warm-Up : 

    1.  What is the best launch angle for a home run in baseball?

    2.  What are the variables that affect the answer to the previous question?

    Baseball Trajectory, with drag

     Today:

    • Prepare your rocket (s)

      • Measure and record empty mass.

      • Measure and record added water volume.

      • Measure/estimate and record your rocket's cross-sectional area in m2.

    • Launch Rockets

    Online Textbook (OpenStax) Reading: 

    Links:  

    • Water Rocket Simulator.  There are others available online.  If you use it, enter 90psi air pressure as "90p"

    Homework:  

    • Prepare for tomorrow.  We will launch rockets and then begin data analysis.  We will be pressurizing rockets to 100psi.
    Image result for ping pong jedisClass 27.5  Thursday 11/17/16

    Warm-Up : 

    A ping-pong ball has a mass of 2.7g, a radius of 2cm, and a drag coefficient of 0.5.   If the density of the surrounding air is 1.2kg/m3, what is the ping-pong ball's terminal velocity?

    Drag = 0.5*Cd*ρ*A*V2

     

     

     Today:

    • 5/6 class -- watch a launch video

    • Work on rockets -- Final launch tomorrow.  Pressurizing to 100psi.

    • Begin spreadsheets.

    Online Textbook (OpenStax) Reading: 

    Links:  

    • Water Rocket Simulator.  There are others available online.  If you use it, enter 90psi air pressure as "90p"

    Homework:  

    • Prepare for tomorrow.  We will launch rockets and then begin data analysis.  We will be pressurizing rockets to 100psi.
    Class 27  Wednesday 11/16/16

    Warm-Up :  Regarding a water rocket's design and launch conditions...

    1.  Why is it bad to have too much weight?

    2.  Why is it bad to have too little weight?

    3.  Why is it bad to have too much water?

    4.  Why is it bad to have too little water?

    5.  Assuming that your rocket is already stable in flight, how can you make it go higher?

     Today:

    • Preview Data Collection

    • Work on rockets

    • Begin spreadsheets

    • Coming Up:

      • Tomorrow: Finish rockets. 

      • Friday:  Final launch

    Online Textbook (OpenStax) Reading: 

    Links:  

    • Water Rocket Simulator.  There are others available online.  If you use it, enter 90psi air pressure as "90p"

    Homework:  

    • If you want to get ahead, work on the drag spreadsheet.
    Class 26  Tuesday 11/15/16

    Warm-Up : 

    No warm-up today.  Get your rocket ready.  Clean up when you're done.

     Today:

    • Rocket Launch

    Online Textbook (OpenStax) Reading: 

    Links:  

    • Water Rocket Simulator There are others available online.  This happens to be the first that I saw.  If you use it, enter 90psi air pressure as "90p"

    Homework:  

    Class 25  Monday 11/14/16

    Warm-Up : 

    One way to find the center of mass of a stick is to support it with two level hands and then slowly move those two hands together until they meet under the stick's center of mass.

    Why does this method work?

     Today:

    • Quiz -- Newton's Laws in 2D

    • Build Rockets.  We will launch twice.  We can do it tomorrow and on Friday, or we can launch on Wednesday and Friday.  What is your preference?

    Online Textbook (OpenStax) Reading: 

    Links:  

    • Water Rocket Simulator There are others available online.  This happens to be the first that I saw.  If you use it, enter 90psi air pressure as "90p"

    Homework:  

    • Do you need to do any outside-of-class work related to your rocket?
    Image result for weather vaneClass 24.5  Friday 11/11/16

    Warm-Up : 

    1.  How does a weather vane work?

    2.  How are good rockets like weather vanes?

    3. The paper rocket on the right can be made even more stable by adding mass to the right part of the rocket.  Where should extra mass be added, and why?

     

     Today:

    Online Textbook (OpenStax) Reading: 

    Links:  

    • Water Rocket Simulator There are others available online.  This happens to be the first that I saw.  If you use it, enter 90psi air pressure as "90p"

    Homework:  

    • Prepare for quiz on Monday.
    Image result for celebratory gunfireClass 24  Thursday, 11/10/16

    Warm-Up : 

    Sometimes people celebrate special occasions by firing guns into the air. 

    1.  Is this ever a good way to celebrate?  Explain.

    2.  What factors do you think might affect the force of drag (air resistance) on a bullet?

    3.  What factors influence the terminal velocity of a bullet?

    Calculated terminal velocities of various spheres.

     Today:

    Online Textbook (OpenStax) Reading: 

    Links:  

    Homework:  

    • Prepare for quiz on Monday.
    Class 23.5  Wednesday, 11/9/16

    Warm-Up : 

    "Fearless" Felix Baumgartner became the first human to break the sound barrier without traveling in a vehicle.  How did he do it?

     Today:

    Online Textbook (OpenStax) Reading: 

    Homework:  

    • Finish the practice quiz.
    Class 23  Monday, 11/7/16

    Warm-Up : 

    The object on the right is being acted upon by 2 forces.  What third force would stop the object's acceleration and thereby introduce a state of dynamic equilibrium?

    1.  How can you find the necessary force graphically?

    2.  How can you find the necessary force numerically?

     Today:

    • Check/review homework from past two classes.

    • Test corrections will be graded and entered before the grading deadline on Wednesday.

    • If you haven't turned in your Newton Sled experiment, turn it in.

    • Statics Problems  Solutions

    Online Textbook (OpenStax) Reading: 

    Homework:  

    Class 22.5  Friday, 11/4/16

    Warm-Up : 

    A 1kg mass is suspended by a string from the ceiling of a train car.  The angle shown remains constant.

    1. Describe the motion of the mass.

    2.  What is the tension in the string?

    3.  What determines an obect's terminal velocity?

     Today:

    • Check/review homework.

    • Finish your  Newton Sled Experiment and turn in one for your group.  When you enter calculations for the launch of the Earth, use only the sled rubber band force (instead of the average).

    Online Textbook (OpenStax) Reading: 

    Homework:  

    • Suppose the angle in the warm-up, above, is 30º and the mass is 3kg.  In this case, what is the train's acceleration?  What is the tension in the string?
    Class 22  Thursday, 11/3/16

    Warm-Up : 

    Why doesn't the arch fall?  In particular, why doesn't the red keystone fall?  What forces are acting on it?

     Today:

    • Due to increased end-of-quarter demand, you can turn in your test corrections to Mr. Stapleton.  For credit, show all work and explanations on separate paper.  Staple the corrections to the front of your test.

    • Newton's Laws + Trig.  Bodies on Inclines practice problem (s).

    Online Textbook (OpenStax) Reading: 

    Homework:  

    Image result for tension in wire physics move a carClass 21.5  Wednesday, 11/2/16

    Warm-Up : 

    The picture on the right shows how a chain can be used to pull a stuck car out of the mud.  All that is required is a small sideways force applied to the center of the chain.  Why does this work?

     Today:

    • Return tests 

    • Work time  -- test corrections?

    Online Textbook (OpenStax) Reading: 

    Homework:  

    • None.  If you're doing test corrections, do as much of the correct as you can on your own.  Then ask a friend or classmate.  The point is really for you to do your own correcting, so only ask Mr. Stapleton for help when you're out of other options.
    Class 21  Tuesday, 11/1/16

    Warm-Up : 

    No Warm up

     Today: Test

    Online Textbook (OpenStax) Reading: 

    Homework:  

    • If you have not completed the Newton Sled spreadsheet, finish it. 
    Class 20.5  Monday, 10/31/16

    Warm-Up : 

    1.  If there is no friction acting on the block, what is its downhill acceleration?

    2.  What µs is necessary to prevent the block from sliding?

     Today:

    Online Textbook (OpenStax) Reading: 

     

    Homework:  

    Class 20 Friday, 10/28/16

    Warm-Up : 

    If we put a big rock on someone's head, can we place a 2"x4" on the rock and then hammer a nail into the 2"x4"?  Is it a good idea?

     Today:

    Online Textbook (OpenStax) Reading: 

    Homework:  

    • Prepare for Tuesday's test.  Fihish the practice test.
    • Some time before next Thursday, finish the Newton Sled Experiment handout.
    Class 19.5  Thursday, 10/27/16

    Warm-Up : 

    Provide SI units and other units for each of these quantities

    Quantity SI Units Other Units
    mass    
    velocity    
    weight    
     time    
    distance    
    force    
    acceleration    
    friction    

     Today:

    Online Textbook (OpenStax) Reading: 

    Homework:  Due by the beginning of class tomorrow...

     

    Class 19  Wednesday, 10/26/16

    Warm-Up :  The figure on the right shows some masses connected by an unstretchable chain of negligible mass that travels over a frictionless, massless pulley in a vacuum.  Assume that each object has a mass of approximately 1kg and a weight of approximately10N.

    1.  What net force is acting on the system of objects?

    2.  What are the objects' accelerations?  (magnitude and direction)

    3.  How do the rope tensions, T1, T2, and T3 compare?  Rank them according to magnitude.

     Today:

    Online Textbook (OpenStax) Reading: 

    Homework:  Due by the beginning of class tomorrow...

    Image result for standing up on the busClass 18.5  Tuesday, 10/25/16

    Warm-Up :

    Each of the people standing in the bus is holding a rail or a handle. 

    1.  As the bus starts moving forward, in which direction will the people exert force on the bus?  Why?

    2. What about when the bus comes to a stop?

     Today:

    Online Textbook (OpenStax) Reading: 

    Homework:  Due by the beginning of class tomorrow...

    • Get some rest.  You will have a lot of work to do later, but not tonight.

     

    Class 18  Monday, 10/24/16

    Warm-Up : 

    Watch these instructional videos.  The total length is about 17 minutes.

     Today:

    1. Watch the Newton Sled Video Instructions, above.
    2. Form a group of 3 people or fewer.
    3. Get a copy of the Newton Sled Directions. You can read these as you work.  They take you through the steps below.
    4. Collect Data
      • Slide the sled to get kinetic friction coefficient data
      • Launch and collect distance and mass data.
    5. Make a copy of this spreadsheet template.  Then enter formulas until your spreadsheet works like the one shown in step 6, below.
    6. Check your spreadsheet answers with this screen shot. 
    7. Find rubber band forces by entering data into your spreadsheet.
    8. If you don't have one already, get the Newton Sled Experiment handout.  Fill out one per group.
    9. What to turn in (due by the beginning of class on Wednesday):

    Online Textbook (OpenStax) Reading: 

    Homework:  IF you haven't already finished the homework for last class, complete it. 

     

    Class 17.5  Tuesday, 10/18/16

    Warm-Up :

    1. How does NASA simulate weightlessness?

    2. You are trying to transfer some drippy sauce across a dinner table using only a drippy spoon.  The sauce needs to go from the pot to your plate without dripping.  Touching only the spoon, how can you make this happen?

     Today:

    Online Textbook (OpenStax) Reading: 

    Homework:  Complete #38, 44, and 47 in Practice with forces in 1 dimension     Answers/solutions  Mr. S. Solutions

     

    Class 17  Monday, 10/17/16

    Warm-Up :

    A 500g mass (circled in red) is going to be launched by rubber bands (yellow highlight) that are stretched between upright screws (blue) and string (green).  Release is accomplished by the burning of the string.  The mass and the launcher are both pendulums.  What will happen when the string is burned?

    Video Link to 500g Newton Sled Launch

    Pendulum launch

     Today:

    • Launcher Project Grade reminder:  If you are missing any portion of the projectile launcher project in PowerSchool, either hand in what's missing or share with me the completed spreadsheet (even if you shared it with me earlier, before you had finished all of it).  I will be adding weights to the grades in the next day or two.
    • Check/review homework. Answers/solutions
    • Newton Sled Experiment
    • Mr. Chase Ch 4 PowerPoint

    Online Textbook (OpenStax) Reading: 

    Homework:  If you didn't understand the last homework problem that was due today, try it again tonight.

    Class 16.5  Friday, 10/14/16

    Warm-Up :

    1. How can the unfortunate character get to the oxygen tank before running out of oxygen?

    2.  What is Newton's 3rd Law?  Can you think of an exception to this law?

    3.  What is a coefficient of friction (µ) and how does µk (for kinetic friction) differ from µs (for static friction)?

     Today:

    Online Textbook (OpenStax) Reading: 

    Homework:  Don't answer question 9 or complete problems 4, 13, 14, 38, 44, and 47, in "Practice with forces in 1 dimension Answers/solutions," but do complete the rest.

    Class 16  Thursday, 10/13/16

    Warm-Up :

    There is a heavy object tied to the ceiling with a string.  Another segment of the from the same roll of string is hanging from the object.  I am going to pull on the bottom string until one of the two strings breaks.  Which string is going to break first?  Why?

     Today:

    Online Textbook (OpenStax) Reading: 

    Homework:  Complete the last two "More Practice: Newton's 1st and 2nd Laws" problems in this handout --  Handout:  Newton's 1st and 2nd Laws

    Class 15.5  Wednesday, 10/11/16

    Warm-Up :

    It is possible to pull the paper from under a dry erase pen without touching or tipping the pen.  Usually, however, the pen falls over.  Why does the pen usually fall?  How can one do this without tipping the pen?  Why does that method work (sometimes)?

     Today:

    • Results of the projectile contest Contest Data.
    • Due to the frenzied contest atmosphere, the contest problem solutions will not be graded.  Recycle or keep them; it's up to you.
    • If you haven't turned in your practice problem solutions or your completed (all three tabs) spreadsheet, you can still do that today.  There wasn't much time for turning things, or for me to remind you to turn things in, during yesterday's class.
    • Mr. Chase Ch 4 PowerPoint
    • Handout:  Newton's 1st and 2nd Laws

    Online Textbook (OpenStax) Reading: 

    Homework:  Complete #1-10 of "More Practice: Newton's 1st and 2nd Laws" in this handout --  Handout:  Newton's 1st and 2nd Laws

     

    Class 15 Tuesday, 10/11/16

    Warm-Up :

    No warm-up today.   See yesterday (below) for details.

    Class 14.5 Monday, 10/10/16

    Warm-Up :

    No warm-up today.

     Today:

    • Turn in your launcher practice problem solutions by the end of class today.  If you completed them as a group, include the names of all group members.
    • Projectile flight path portion of your spreadsheet is due today.
    • Here are the current launcher groups.  If you're not on the spreadsheet, someone from your group needs to fill out the launcher groups form.
    • No sand-box until Tuesday.
    • Projectile launcher work time. 
      • When you're shooting, be polite and safe.  Don't disrupt the rest of the school.  Stay away from classrooms.  Don't break things or give the appearance that you're breaking things.  Remember that inappropriate behavior from just a few students could prevent us from being able to do interesting projects in the future.
      • Return all items to their proper locations and clean up any messes that you make.  E.g. don't leave stools in the hallway and rubber bands on the counters.
    • Competition Schedule and Details:
      1. Location:  Guidance lobby
      2. 10 Minute Setup Time:
        •  launcher set-up and testing
        • laptop pwer up and log-in
      3. Problems are handed out.  Answer on paper.  No test-firing after this point.  Test firing will result in disqualification.
        1. The "launch area" will be either a 0.75m x 0.75m section of the floor or a 0.75m x 0.75m wooden table top.  Your launcher must remain within this area, and the projectile must be launched from a point no higher than 0.5m above the surface of the launch area.
        2. The "distance to the target" will be measured horizontally from the center of the target to a clearly-marked central point 0.25m behind the front edge of the launch area.
        3. The target will be an egg in the center of a 1m square of sand.
      4. 20 minutes planning time
      5. Firing order is revealed.
      6. Firing:
        1. Each group gets a total of 5 minutes to set up and fire at least once (twice at most) from each location. 
        2. If two shots are fired from one location, the errors for those shots will be averaged.
        3. Error is determined based on the projectile's first point of impact.  Bounces do not count.
        4. If you crack or dent the egg, your error for that shot is -5cm.  If your projectile bounces off of the egg, your error is 0cm.
      7. Overall average low score wins

    Online Textbook (OpenStax) Reading: 

    Homework:  

    • Complete all three sheets within your projectile launcher spreadsheet and share it with Mr. Stapleton.  Due on Tuesday.  This assignment may be completed as a group.
    Class 14 Friday, 10/7/16

    Warm-Up :

    1.  How can you measure the angle of your projectile launcher?

    2.  Based on the diagram to the right, what do the words accuracy and precision mean?

    3.  How can you maximize your projectile-launching accuracy?  What about your precision?

     Today:

    • Fill out the launcher groups form.
    • No sand-box until Tuesday.
    • Projectile launcher work time. 
      • When you're shooting, be polite and safe.  Don't disrupt the rest of the school.  Stay away from classrooms.  Don't break things or give the appearance that you're breaking things.  Remember that inappropriate behavior from just a few students could prevent us from being able to do interesting projects in the future.
      • Experiment with ways to improve precision and accuracy. 
      • Calibrate your launcher (graph of initial velocity vs launcher setting). 
      • Finish your flight path spreadsheet.
      • Practice shooting things. Suggestion -- input some angle and initial velocity into your trajectory graph.  Attempt to shoot with those same values for angle and Vo.  Compare your actual flight path to the spreadsheet.  *** Don't forget to account for the release point of your launcher being higher than the surface on which the launcher rests.
      • Return all items to their proper locations and clean up any messes that you make.  E.g. don't leave stools in the halway and rubber bands on the counters.
    • Projectile launcher competition on Tuesday.  2 Physics classes, 1 grand prize -- Large Pepperoni Pizza or Equivalent

    Online Textbook (OpenStax) Reading: 

    Homework:  Both assignments may be completed as a group

    • Share with Mr. Stapleton by the end of class on Monday:  Complete the trajectory (flight path) sheet within your overall projectile launcher spreadsheet.
    • Due on Monday:  Use your trajectory (flight path) sheet to "solve" the three example problems in the projectile launcher project overview.  The solution to each problem must include an initial speed and a release angle.  Together your speed and release angle combination should guarantee an impact point within 5cm of the target.  For this homework, assume that the release point is at the same elevation as the "launch pad."
    Class 13.5 Thursday, 10/6/16

    Warm-Up :

    At the angle shown, can the projectile launcher hit the target?  If not, how should the launcher be adjusted?

     Today:

    Online Textbook (OpenStax) Reading: 

    Homework:  

    • Complete before Monday, but do nut turn in until Tuesday:  Complete the trajectory (flight path) sheet within your overall projectile launcher spreadsheet.
    • Due on Monday:  Use your trajectory (flight path) sheet to "solve" the three example problems in the projectile launcher project overview.  The solution to each problem must include an initial speed and a release angle.  Together your speed and release angle combination should guarantee an impact point within 5cm of the target.  For this homework, assume that the release point is at the same elevation as the "launch pad."
    Class 13 Wednesday, 10/5/16

    Warm-Up : No warm-up today.  Some students are leaving early, so we will start the test right away.

     Today:

    Online Textbook (OpenStax) Reading: 

    Homework:  

    Class 12.5 Tuesday, 10/4/16

    Warm Up :

    Some children are standing on a very, very, large merry-go-round that is rotating clockwise when viewed from above.

    1) Child A is standing near the eastern edge of the merry-go-round.  The velocity of the merry-go-round at that point is 4m/s southward.  The child always walks at a rate of 5m/s across any surface.  What compass heading should the child follow if  child A wants to actually travel in a Westward direction?  What will be the child's ground speed?

    2)  Child B is standing near the northern edge of the merry-go-round, so the velocity of the merry-go-round near Child B has a velocity of 4m/s eastward.  This child is slightly slower,  always walking at a rate of 3m/s across any surface.  If the child walks with a heading that is directly southward, what will be Child B's actual direction and speed of travel, relative to the Earth?

     Today:

    Online Textbook (OpenStax) Reading: 

    Homework:  

    • Study.  Test tomorrow.  You will be given all of the formulas from the first test, plus the formulas on the recent practice test.
    Class 12 Monday, 10/3/16

    Warm Up :

    How can you find the muzzle velocity of a projectile launcher?

    1)  Propose at least two different methods of finding the projectile's initial speed.

    2)  Which method is easiest?  Why?

    3)  Do you know of an easy way to tie a loop on the end of a piece of string?

     Today:

    • Test related questions?  Ch 3 Test next Wednesday (2-D kinematics)
    • Introduction to projectile launchers and project
      • Projectile Launcher Project Outline
        • Monday
          • Form groups of 3 (possibly 2)
          • Familiarize with launchers. You will be sharing the basic launcher with a group from the other class.
            • Share: basic launcher frame and trigger
            • Don't share:  pluncher, string, rubber bands
          • Work on spreadsheets
        • Tuesday:  Calibrate launcher, complete spreadsheets
        • Wednesday:  Test.  Launcher time after test.
        • Thursday:  Launcher work time
        • Friday: 
          • Competition
            • Be prepared for any release angle between 0 and 70 degrees and any initial speed between 3m/s and 9m/s.
            • Launch surface may be higher or lower than target height.
            • Launch through a window at some vertical height between launcher and target (e.g. window spans 1.5m to 2.5m, vertically, and is 2m, horizontally, from the target.  Launch platform is 5m, horizontally, from the target)
            • Logistics:
              • Final calibration time
              • Problems are presented
              • Calculation time
              • One shot at each target.
          • What to turn in:
            • Share your completed spreadsheets.
            • Problem sheet with solutions and an explanation of how you arrived at those solutions.
          • Grading based on satisfactory completion of spreadsheets and problem sheet (above.)  Extra points added to winners' scores:  1st place = 5%.  2nd Place 3%.  3rd Place = 2%.
          • Prize for overall winners.

    Online Textbook (OpenStax) Reading: 

    Homework:  

    • Prepare for a Test on Wednesday.  You will be given all of the formulas from the first test, plus the formulas on the recent practice test.
    Class 11.5 Friday, 9/30/16
    (B7: 12:25-12:55, B8: 1-1:30)

    Warm Up : A green hunter and a blue hunter point their guns directly at a fake orange monkey and then fire simultaneously.  Just as the two hunters fire their guns, the monkey slips and freefalls from the treetop. 

    1. Where does each hunter's projectile end up, relative to the monkey?  High, low, or in the monkey?

    2.  How would the result have been different if the monkey stayed in position at the top of the tree?

    3.  Do the answers to these questions depend on the bullet velocities?

     Today:

    Online Textbook (OpenStax) Reading: 

    Homework:  

    • Prepare for a Test on Wednesday.  You will be given all of the formulas from the first test, plus the formulas on the recent practice test.
    Image result for airspeedClass 11 Thursday, 9/29/16

    Warm Up :

    Aircraft pilots use the terms "air speed," "ground speed," and "wind speed." 

    1.  What does each of the terms mean?

    2.  In vector addition problems, which of those quantities will always be the magnitude of the resultant vector?

    3.  In the figures on the right, why was the word "velocity" substituted for "speed?"

    4.  For each of the figures on the right, visualize the missing vector.

    5.  Two canoeists travel across a lake.  Both want to head directly toward magnetic North, but there is a wind blowing westward.  The first canoeist pulls out a compass and begins to paddle so that the bow of the canoe is always in line with the north-pointing compass needle.  The second canoeist uses the compass to find a tree that is directly to the north on the other side of the lake.  The second canoeist then paddles with the bow of the canoe always pointing toward the tree.  Do the paths of the canoeists differ?  If so, how?

     Today:

    Online Textbook (OpenStax) Reading: 

    Homework:  

    2-D Kinematics Practice Quiz  -- solutions are on Misterstapleton YouTube channel.
    Class 10.5 Wednesday, 9/28/16

    Warm Up :

    In the absence of friction, if you made a hole through the center of the Earth, you would come out the other side in approximately 42 minutes. 

    1. What else would happen to you? 

    2. Where would you come out?

    3.  What if there were air resistance? (antipodes map)

    Excel spreadsheet -- falling through the earth

     Today:

    Online Textbook (OpenStax) Reading: 

    Homework:  

    • No new homework
    Class 10 Tuesday, 9/27/16

    Warm Up :

    1.  What is happening to Vx and Vy at each moment in this photograph?

    2.  If each of jumper's images represents a successive video frame, was the frame rate constant?

     Today:

    Online Textbook (OpenStax) Reading: 

    Homework:  

    Class 9.5 Monday, 9/26/16

    Warm Up : Trig. review

    1.  What are sine, cosine, and tangent?

    2.  Use trigonometry to find the missing vector magnitudes on the right.

     Today:

    • Check/review river problem [Solution -- On Jane's method, the math under the radical is incorrect.  It should be (3m/s)2- (2m/s)2]
    • Pumpkin Chuckin' Update.
    • Using Trig to solve the "random" vector problems from last class.  Here's a new answer sheet.

    Online Textbook (OpenStax) Reading: 

    Homework:  

    Class 9 Friday, 9/23/16

    Warm Up :

    1.  Suppose the two vectors on the right represent two forces acting on the clam.  In what direction will the clam accelerate?  What will be the magnitude of the net force accelerating the clam in that direction?

    2.  The diagram on the right shows a top view of a train car that is moving at a rate of 2m/s.  You are in the car.  In which direction and how fast should you walk in order to have the intended velocity shown on the right.

     Today:

    Online Textbook (OpenStax) Reading: 

    Homework:  

    Class 8.5 Thursday, 9/22/16

    Warm Up : How can we use Logger Pro to calculate the flight displacement of the soccer ball in the video on the right? (ignoring the effects of air resistance). 

     Today:

    • Return extended problems
    • Grades are in PowerSchool
      • Explain Grading -- tests, quizzes, other, quarter
      • Check your grades
    • Graphical Vector Addition -- Head to Tail Method

    Online Textbook (OpenStax) Reading: 

    Homework:  

    • Suggested -- reading, see above.
    • If you want to do test corrections, show your new answers and your work on another sheet of paper.  If I accidentally fixed your answer for you, explain the reason for the change in the answer.  To get credit, meet with Mr. Stapleton to go over your corrections.  Flex block is a good time. You may be expected to answer some questions about your corrections.
    Class 8 Wednesday, 9/21/16

    Warm Up : (Ignore air resistance for all questions)

    Suppose a plane is flying at a constant elevation of 500m and the pilot is trying to drop a bomb on a target on the ground. 

    1.  If the  plane is flying with a speed (relative to the ground) of 200m/s, how far in advance should be bomb be released?

    2.  For an observer watching the plane from our perspective, what is the shape of the bomb's flight path?

    3.  How does the bomb's flight path appear different to someone on the plane?

    4.  If a base jumper had jumped off of a 500m tall tower just as the plane passed and dropped the bomb, how would the bomb's flight path appear to the jumper.

     Today:

    Online Textbook (OpenStax) Reading: 

    Homework:  

    • Suggested -- reading, see above.
    • If you want to do test corrections, show your new answers and your work on another sheet of paper.  If I accidentally fixed your answer for you, explain the reason for the change in the answer.  To get credit, meet with Mr. Stapleton to go over your corrections.  Flex block is a good time. You may be expected to answer some questions about your corrections.
    Class 7.5 Tuesday, 9/20/16

    Warm Up : None

     Today:

    • Test

    Online Textbook (OpenStax) Reading: 

    Homework:  Optional -- reading, see above.

    Class 7 Monday, 9/19/16

    Warm Up :

    A race car is traveling counterclockwise around a circular track.  The car's speedometer stays on exactly 100mph the whole time.

    1.  Describe each of the following:   a)  the car's speed   b) the car's velocity  c) the car's acceleration.

    2.  An object can have increasing speed and decreasing velocity at the same time.  Which other combinations of speed and velocity are possible?

    Today:

    • Check/Discuss homework -- questions?
    • Questions about the test?
    • Test Topics
      • Concepts:  vectors and scalars, position, speed, velocity, acceleration, displacement, distance traveled
      • Relationship between acceleration, speed, and velocity.  Be able to provide real examples of objects having different combinations of a, v, and speed.
      • Solving Problems with Kinematics Formulas:
        • You will be expected to memorize the simplest formulas.  The diagrams on the right show the formula list that I have been giving you and the trimmed down version that will be provided on the test.  Memorize the formulas that have been crossed out.  *You may want to add them to the list as soon as you receive your test.
        • Draw a picture
        • List what you know:  vx0, v, vave, Δv, x, x0, Δx, t, t0, Δt, aave = a
        • Find the right formula (know ahead of time what each can do)
        • Don't forget to include proper units with your answer.
        • In the case of freefall, a = g.
      • Memorize g (average acceleration due to gravity at Earth's surface).  g = -9.8m/s2
      • Graphical representation of position, velocity, and acceleration
        • Velocity = slope of position vs. time graph
        • Acceleration = slope of velocity vs. time graph
      • Freefall -- what does it mean?
      • What to study: everything -- notes, practice problems/question, the quiz
    • New Unit:  2-D motion

    Online Textbook (OpenStax) Reading: 

    Homework:  Study for the test.  There will be no warm-up next class; just the test.  Bring a pencil and a calculator.

    Image result for long exposureClass 6.5 Friday, 9/16/16

    Warm Up :

    Suppose we strap a light source to a bike tire and then roll the tire to the right while taking a long-exposure photograph through several rotations of the tire. 

    1.  Describe the appearance of the photograph.

    2.  In the X dimension, what would graphs of position, velocity, and acceleration look like for the light source?

    Today:

    Online Textbook (OpenStax) Reading: 

    Homework:  

     
    Image result for car at stop lightClass 6 Thursday, 9/15/16

    Warm Up :

    A car is traveling in a positive direction down a straight road with multiple traffic lights.  At t0, the car is sitting still at a light.  After a few seconds, the light turns green and the car travels to the next traffic light, at which it stops.  The car waits until the light turns green, and then it travels to the next traffic light and stops again at tfinal.

    1.  Sketch a reasonable graph of position vs time for the car's journey.

    2.  Use your position vs. time graph to sketch a graph of velocity vs. time.

    3.  Use your velocity vs. time graph to sketch a graph of acceleration vs. time.

    Today:

    Online Textbook (OpenStax) Reading: 

    Homework:  

    Before Monday:  Complete Kinematics Review and Loose Ends and check your answers using Kinematics Review and Lose Ends -- Answers.  Come to class prepared to ask questions about problems you may have encountered on the assignment.

    Class 5.5 Wednesday, 9/14/16

    Warm Up :

    No warm-up today.

     

    Today:

    • Work in the computer lab:
      •  finish the spreadsheet.
      • When your spreadsheet is complete, share your document with Mr. Stapleton.

    Online Textbook (OpenStax) Reading: 

    Homework:  Extended kinematics problems

    Class 5 Tuesday, 9/13/16

    Warm Up :

    A lead ball is free-falling downward.  At a height of 100m, the ball's velocity is -10m/s.  Use the formula above to find the ball's height when it reaches -20m/s? 

    Assume a = g = -10m/s^2.

    Today:

    • Check/discuss homework
    • Look at some motion videos
    • Freefall notes
    • Intro to working with formulas in spreadsheets.
    • Work in the computer lab:
      • Make a copy of the Kinematics Formula Spreadsheet Template.  Rename it with your name.  Solve all of the problems by inserting formulas into the yellow cells.
      • Tomorrow, go directly to the computer lab.  You will have the whole class to finish the spreadsheet.
      • When your spreadsheet is complete, share your document with Mr. Stapleton.

    Online Textbook (OpenStax) Reading: 

    Homework:  

    • Tomorrow's class will be entirely in the computer lab.  Show up there.
    • Finish the kinematics formula spreadsheet before class on Thursday.  You will have all of next class to work on it in the computer lab.
    Class 4.5 Monday, 9/12/16

    Warm Up :

    10 letter symbols are used in the formulas on the right.  Be prepared to explain the meaning of each symbol and how to find a value for that symbol.

    Today:

    Online Textbook (OpenStax) Reading: 

    Homework:  

    • Find a way to measure/calculate/estimate the acceleration of gravity using this video.  If you started early, and you used Logger Pro, that's okay, but otherwise find a solution that does not involve logger pro.  With a little ingenuity, you can arrive at a decent answer from any computer with internet access.  Remember that you can see greater detail if you download the video and watch it using Quicktime.  Show your work and be prepared to show/explain your methods to the class.  If you cannot find a way to do this, explain why you can't.  What data are you missing, and how would you get it?  There are more precise and less precise ways to do this, but you will not be graded on the precision of your answer.  You already know what it should be.  Due Tomorrow.
    • Optional -- If you need more practice using kinematics formulas, work through the examples and practice problems in the online textbook, Chapter 2.5: Motion Equations for Constant Acceleration in One Dimension
    Image result for usain bolt sprint 100mClass 4 Friday, 9/9/16

    Warm Up :

    1.  How many feet are in a mile?

    2.  Usain Bolt sprinted 100m in 9.58s.  If 1 foot = 0.3048m, what was his average speed in miles per hour?  Please do not look up the unit conversion on the web!

    Today:

    • Quiz
    • Freefall notes
    • Make and shoot paper projectiles. Then estimate their apogees and initial velocities.

    Online Textbook (OpenStax) Reading: 

    Homework:  

    • Find a way to measure/calculate the acceleration of gravity using this video.  Show your work and be prepared to show/explain your methods to the class.  Due on Tuesday.
    • If you have not finished the video analysis activity, but you would like to receive credit for it, you must have your spreadsheet row filled out by Monday.
    Class 3.5 Thursday, 9/8/16

    Warm Up :

     Match each position vs. time graph with the correct velocity and acceleration graph.

    Today:

    • Check/review homework (solutions -- pdf)
    • quiz preview
    • Look at some motion videos -- prizes for fastest/most acceleration

    Online Textbook (OpenStax) Reading: 

    Homework:  Practice quiz next class.  If you like your score, you can keep it as a real quiz grade.  What's on the quiz:

    • Velocity notes
    • Notes: Acceleration and kinematics formulas -- formulas will be provided on the quiz.  Solutions will be straightforward (unlike #9 and #10 on last night's homework).  To solve each problem, you will be able to find an equation with one missing variable.
    • You must provide answers with correct units.
    • Interpreting position vs time and velocity vs time graphs.  The motion sensor activity should have helped prepare you for this.  Expect questions like the warm-up from today and from class 1.5.

     

    Image result for cat falling from buildingClass 3 Wednesday, 9/7/16

    Warm Up :

    Emergency clinic records of 132 cats that jumped from windows of buildings showed a 90% survival rate.  The average drop was 5.5 floors. 

    Injuries increased with increasing heights up to 7 floors. When cats fell from over 7 floors, they actually suffered from “less injuries.” 

    1.  Why do injuries increase from floors 1-6? Why would injuries decrease at over 7 floors?

    2.  When you're solving physics problems, what do you think matters most, using the correct units or using the correct symbols?

     

    Today:

     

    Online Textbook (OpenStax) Reading: 

    Homework:   Kinematics problems 1-10  Answers Below:

    1. 4 yards/sec     2. 3.33 hours   3.  -78.4m/s    4.  -490m    5.  -0.4m/s^2    8a. 3m/s^2      8b.  -37.5m     9. -4.4m/s^2     10. 13.33m/s

     

     

    Class 2.5 Tuesday, 9/6/16

    Warm Up :

    Assuming that the man in the picture is 2m tall, and the frame rate of the camera was 10fps, what were the approximate maximum and minimum speeds of the object?

    Today:

    • Share/upload video footage
    • Complete Logger Pro Analysis of a video.
    • How to create position vs time and velocity vs time graphs.
    • Begin Video Analysis:
      1. Choose two videos.  Make sure that each video is accessible (shared -- "anyone with link) through someone's Google Drive. 
      2. Download both videos and use frame-by-frame analysis to create position vs time and velocity vs time graphs for each video. 
      3. Try to analyze one video using Logger Pro and analyze another video without using Logger Pro.  To use Logger Pro, you will probably need a school computer.  To make your task easier, feel free to copy these spreadsheets (Logger Pro method for stationary camera, Moving Camera Method) and modify them to meet your needs. If you need help, watch Mr. Stapleton's video on the misterstapleton YouTube channel.   Hopefully, instructions will be uploaded by Tuesday after school.
      4. Paste links to your videos and completed graphs here -- A5/6A7/8

     

    Online Textbook (OpenStax) Reading: 

    Homework:   None.  Continue video analysis next class.

    Image result for jamaican sprint 100mClass 2 Friday, 9/2/16

    Warm Up :

    A runner sprints exactly 100m, rests for a moment and then slowly follows the same path back to the starting line.  This entire trip takes 200s.  For the questions below, consider the runner's entire round trip.

    1.  What distance did the runner travel?
    2.  What was the runner's displacement?
    3.  What was the runner's average velocity?
    4.  What was the runner's average speed?

    5.  Why is the thirsty man so small?
    more Julian Beever pictures (like the one on the right)

    Today:

    Links:

    Example Logger Pro Analysis -- partly done

    moving camera spreadsheet link

    Online Textbook (OpenStax) Reading: 

    Homework:

    Class 1.5 Thursdsay, 9/1/16

    Warm Up :

    The graph on the right shows the positions at different times for seven different people, relative to a motion detector at the 0m mark.  Which person(people) was (were)...
    1. moving at a constant speed
    2. moving toward the sensor)
    3. not moving at all
    4. accelerating
    5. decelerating
    6. accelerating the fastest
    7. moving at the fastest constant speed

    Today:

    Handouts:

    Online Textbook (OpenStax) Reading: 

    Homework:

    • Complete velocity notes #5-8

     

    Class 1

    Wednesday, 8/31/16

    Physics 200: Mr. Stapleton

    Warm Up Question:

    Spin one of the "sprotating cylinders" by pressing one end until it squirts out from under your finger.  Try pressing the other end.

    When the cylinder is spinning, why do you only see the symbol that you press?

    Slow motion

    Today:

    • Learn names/pronunciations
    • Enter attendance
    • Mr. Stapleton background, philosophy, slideshow, etc.
    • Go over course expectations, class overview
      • First Quarter (subject to change):
        • Approximately 3 tests
        • 1 major project
      • First Unit:  Motion in 1 Dimension.  Velocity, acceleration, etc.
    • Questions?
    • Motion Matching Activity  Matching Motion Graphs with motion detector(Web page) 

    Handouts:

    Online Textbook (OpenStax) Reading: 

    Homework:

    • Have your parents/guardians review and sign your course expectations.  Then return them to Mr. Stapleton.
    • Suggested Reading (see above)
    • Other?