Class 81 (last class) Thursday, 6/2/16

Warm-Up: 

1. What is the current phase of the moon?

2. What's a blue moon?

3.  Suppose you hold a sphere at arm's length and use it to cover up the moon.  How large does the object need to be to perfectly cover up the moon?  Quarter sized?  Dime sized?  Something else?  What if you are trying to cover the sun.

 

Today's Agenda:  

Homework:  

  • Prepare for the exam.

Class 80 (2nd to last class day) Tuesday, 5/31/16

Warm-Up: 

1.  According to the diagram, on what date are we closest to the sun?
2.  Why is it cold at that time?

3.  How many time zones are there?

4.  What time is it at the North Pole?

Today's Agenda:  

Homework:  

  • Work on final exam review packet

Class 79 (2 more classes after today) Thursday, 5/26/16

Warm-Up: 

The Sun, Earth, and Moon are continually spaghettifying one another.  We see the effects of this spaghettification in the form of tides.

1.  What causes spaghettification?

2.  How much gravitational force do the Sun and Moon each exert on 1,000,000 pounds of water?

3.  Do we see different sides of the moon, or do we always see the same side?

4.  Is the Earth's 24 hour rotational period speeding up or slowing down over time?  Explain. Answer

Good source of information about tides

 

Today's Agenda:  

  • Essays are due today.  If you do not want your essay to be graded, type PLEASE GRADE LATER at the top.  If I see this note, your essay will be considered late.  If you have not finished your late essay by next Thursday, it will be graded as is.

  • Return Quizzes

  • Mistakes on the review packet

  • Last Topic -- System of the Earth, Moon, and Sun.  Today:  Time of Day, Eclipses, and Tides pdf version

  • Next Class:  seasons and final exam review

  • Get final exam review packet -- complete by next Thursday for 5% added to your final exam grade.

Homework:  

  • Work on final exam review packet

Class 78 Tuesday, 5/24/16

Warm-Up:   

The pictures on the rights show a person shooting a laser upward at a mirror.  The laser beam then bounces the downward to a detector.  The top picture shows what the guy with the laser observes.  The other pictures show what the observer in another spacecraft observes.

1) Who sees the light travel farther?

2) Assuming that they can both measure the light's speed, who thinks the light is traveling faster?

3) Who is correct?

4)  What's the point?

 

Today's Agenda:  

  • If you did not give me editing privileges, you did not receive comments on your Final Stirling Engine progress report.  If you want comments, change your share settings so that I can comment, and then re-submit the form.

  • Discuss Stirling Engines, problem-solving, and "failure."

  • Quiz over Notes #4-10.

  • Essays are due on Thursday.  You will not have essay work time next class.  Final lesson next class -- motions of the Earth and Moon.

  • Having trouble finding material for your essay?  New Essay Topic Options  Some helpful research links

  • Dismantle, recycle, trash unwanted Stirling engines
  • Essay work time -- library?
  • Get final exam review packet

Homework:  

  • Work on your essay.  It is due next onThursday.

Class 77 Friday, 5/20/16

Warm-Up:   

The picture on the right shows an explosion.  This explosion shares some similarities with the Big Bang theory of the Universe's formation.

 

1.  In the picture, which bits of matter are traveling fastest?  How can you tell?

 

2.  One product of this explosion is the movement of bits of matter.  Identify another product of the explosion.

 

3.  Look at the picture of the explosion and try to determine the location where the explosion originated.

 

4.  In some ways, the expansion of the Universe after the Big Bang was like the expansion after the explosion above.  In other ways, it was more like the inflation of the surface of a balloon.  The fiery explosion above had a center -- a point of origin -- but the Univsere did not.  Can you identify one particular coin that represents the center of the expanding balloon surface?

 

Today's Agenda:  

Other stuff:

 Homework:  

  • Work on your essay.  It is due next Thursday.

  • Study:  Quiz next class over #4-10 from the notes.

  • Extra 100% homework grade for anyone who has written (not pasted) 300 words in your essay by the time I check it today.

Class 76 Wednesday, 5/18/16

Warm-Up:   

If you're standing next to a race track, what do you hear as the cars pass you?

a.  Their pitch changes from high to low.

b.  Their pitch changes from low to high.

c.  There is no change in pitch.



Today's Agenda:  

Other stuff:

 Homework:  

  • Check your grades in PowerSchool and make a plan to fix anything that needs fixing.

  • Work on your essay.  It is due next Thursday.

  • Study:  Quiz next class over #1-3 from notes.

  • Extra 100% homework grade for anyone who has written (not pasted) 300 words in your essay by next class.

Class 75 Friday, 5/13/16
Warm-Up:
This solar oven has several features that helps it create a high temperature environment using solar energy.  One of those features exploits the Greenhouse Effect.  
1. What part of the solar oven targets the Greenhouse Effect? 
2.  How does the Greenhouse Effect work? 
3.  What can be done to limit the effects of the Greenhouse Effect?

Today's Agenda:  

  1. Greenhouse effect simulation.

  2. A3/4:  Return/discuss quizzes

  3. Work time today:

    1. Finish the last Stirling Engine Project submission.  Follow the instructions on this slideshow template.  Due next Wednesday.  Paste your link intothis form.

    2. Create a Google Doc for your essay and share it (give editing permission) with Mr. Stapleton. Friday.  Submit a link using this form.

  4. Star Life Cycles Notes Stars and The Big Bang (ppt)

 Homework:  

  • Work on your essay and Final Stirling Engine report.

  • A3/4 -- Complete the Stirling Engine Questions handout and watch the accompanying videos.  There is no due date for this assignnment, but it will help you prepare for some questions that will be on the final exam.  The assignment is not required, but if you complete it, you get credit and knowledge.

Class 75 Wednesday, 5/11/16
Warm-Up:




Today's Agenda:  

  1. A1/2 and A5/6:  Return quizzes. Check homework: Review the Stirling Engine Questions

  2. A3/4:  Quiz over formation of the solar system

  3. Finish the last Stirling Engine Project submission.  Follow the format of this slideshow template.  Due next Wednesday.

    1. Get a final picture of your Stirling Engine

    2. Transfer pictures and text from your other submissions

    3. Complete a final analysis.  Follow the instructions on this slideshow template.

      1. What went wrong

      2. What innovatioins would make it easier to build a Stirling engine?

      3. Groups of 3:  Explain how a stirling engine can be run in reverse to function as a heat pump.

  4. Create a Google Doc for your essay and share it (give editing permission) with Mr. Stapleton. Friday.  Submit a link using the form below.

  5. Essay update:  New length requirement -- 750 - 1,250 words, not including references.  For full credit should have at least two references for each topic. scp

  6. Work time today:  Slideshow and/or Essay research

 Homework:  

  • Create and share your essay Google Doc (see above).  Fill out this form, which includes a space for pasting a link to your Google Doc. You are not required to have completed any writing at this point, but you should begin soon.  You might want to use this document as a location for storing links and other information that you have found.

  • Finish your final Stirling Engine Project submission.  Submit the project using this form.  Due next Wednesday (Tuesday isScience NECAP day for juniors.).

Class 74 Monday, 5/9/16
Warm-Up:

1.  Identify the crank shafts, piston rods, pistons, and cylinders in the pictures on the right.
2.  What is meant when someone says an engine has lost compression?

Today's Agenda:  

  1. A1/2 and A5/6:  Quiz over Solar System Formation, Stirling Engine Questions

  2. A3/4:  Formation of the Solar System Notes:  how can a cloud of dust and ice turn into a solar system by simply obeying the laws of physics?

  3. The Stirling engine materials are in C211 so that you can continue your work during flex block.

  4. Next class:  Complete final Stirling Engine slide (s)

 Homework:  

  • A3/4:  Study for quiz next class over solar system formation.

  • Conduct background research for your essay.  Be prepared to give an update on what you've done by Friday.

  • A1/2, A3/4:  Finish the Stirling Engine Concepts Sheet

Class 73 Thursday, 5/5/16
Warm-Up:

For purposes of illustration, the proportions in the diagram on the right have been intentionally exaggerated.

1.  Regarding the masses that are involved, what's wrong with the equation?

2.  E = mc2 is a famous equation.  What do each of the letters in the equation represent?

 

Today's Agenda:  

  1. Due to utter failure by Mr. Stapleton, what was planned for today will be shifted to Monday.  We will wrap up the Stirling engine stuff then.

  2. Formation of the Solar System Notes:  how can a cloud of dust and ice turn into a solar system by simply obeying the laws of physics?

  3. Beginning tomorrow, the Stirling engine materials will be moved to C211 so that you can continue your work during flex block.

 Homework:  

  • Study for quiz next class over solar system formation

  • Conduct background research for your essay.  Be prepared to give an update on what you've done by next Friday.

Class 72 Tuesday, 5/3/16
Warm-Up:

Where are we in the Universe? 

If you were going to write a letter to someone in the most distant reaches of the universe, how would you write your return address?

scale of universe

laniakea supercluster

planck length

graphic

 

Today's Agenda:  

  1. Discuss the last Stirling engine progress reports.

  2. Check your grade in PowerSchool.  Some of you need to:

    • Complete the Stirling engine progress reports.

      • If you need a picture to complete the progress report homework for last class, you can get one now.

    • Take the rock dating test

    • Take the atoms and isotopes quiz

  3. Rest of the year to-do list:

    • Stirling Engine Wrap-up:

      • Operate a working Stirling Engine (next class, hopefully)

      • Stirling Engine Final Report:  Compile Stirling engine notes plus a final analysis.  Groups of three must explain how a Stirling engine run in reverse could function as a heat pump.

      • Those who want to try to get their Stirling engines working can continue to work on them during Flex block in C211.  A working (self-sustaining for at least 30 seconds) Stirling engine will be worth a 105% test grade and much glory.

    • Independent essay on Vermont life in the year 2100.  Due on May 26th

    • Formation of the Solar System and the Earth

    • The Greenhouse Effect

    • Star Life Cycles

    • Newton's Laws and their application to Orbits

    • Cycles relating to the Earth, Moon, and Sun

      • Day/night

      • Moon phases, tides, and eclipses

      • Seasons

 Homework:  Varies.  Read the information above and decide what you should do before next class.

Class 71 Wednesday, 4/29/16
Warm-Up:

How does a Stirling engine really work?  Does the balloon move because of convection currents or because of changes in pressure?

Today's Agenda:  

  1. Please give me editing rights to your progress report.  That way I can make helpful comments and suggestions.

  2. Beware of website issues.

  3. Work on Stirling engines.

 Homework:  

  • Before next class:

    • Make sure that you have given Mr. Stapleton editing rights to your Stirling Engine progress report #2.

    • Add two more slides to your stirling engine progress report #2.  These new slides should have the same type of content as your current 2nd and 3rd slides, but you should insert a new photo (dated 4/29) on the first new slide, and you should include new problems and solutions on your 2nd new slide.  

Class 70 Wednesday, 4/27/16
Warm-Up:

How can we solve these common problems?

1.  Wire is difficult to straighten.

2.  It's hard to bend wire into a nice crankshaft.

3.  The task of attaching wires loosely but securely to a crankshaft is challenging.

Today's Agenda:  

  1. Hopefully you have submitted your 1st Stirling Engine Progress Report.  If you haven't, it is late.

  2. A few tips.

  3. Work on Stirling engines.

 Homework:  

  • Before next class, complete a simpler Stirling engine progress report #2:

    • Report on your Stirling engine progress by completing the slides in this template #2.

    • Submit your form by sharing with Mr. Stapleton and then pasting a link into this form #2.

Class 69 Monday, 4/25/16
Warm-Up:

What's the main difference between an alpha Stirling engine and a beta Stirling engine?

Today's Agenda:  

  1. Example Stirling Engine progress report

  2. If Mr. Stapleton photographs your stirling engine, he will put the photos on the Student drive, in the Stapleton, EPS 200 folder.

  3. Mr. Stapleton's solar Stirling Engine produces 0.65V

  4. Return quizzes

  5. Work on Stirling Engines

  6. Clean up. Store materials and engines.

 Homework:  

  • Before next class:

    • Report on your Stirling engine progress by completing the slides in this template.

    • Submit your form by sharing with Mr. Stapleton and then pasting a link into this form.

Class 68 Thursday, 4/14/16
Warm-Up:

1.  If an activity is sustainable, what does that mean?

2.  Directly or indirectly, that activity is made possible by some type of energy.  Where does (did) that energy come from?

3.  How will this activity be supported in the future -- or is it unsustainable?

Today's Agenda:  

  1. Quiz retake

  2. Work on Stirling Engines

  3. Clean up. Store materials and engines.

    1. Emerging Stirling engines are stored in the computer lab.

    2. Raw materials (cardboard) should be neatly bundled, labeled, and stored in the correct stack in the back of the room.

    3. Individual cans can be kept behind glass on the bookshelf.

 Homework:  No Homework

Class 67 Tuesday, 4/12/16
Warm-Up:

1.  How do each of the glues on the right"cure."  Is it a physical or chemical change?

2. For each type of glue, how can you speed up the cure time?

3. What are the advantages and disadvantages of each type of glue?

4. Should you ever remove a glue stick from a hot glue gun after you have started melting the stick?

5.  Does a hot glue gun need to cool before you wrap its cord around it to put the glue gun away?

6.  If you get some hot glue on your skin, should you wipe it off immediately, or should you let it harden?

Today's Agenda:  

 

  1. Return quiz

  2. Build an Atom game

  3. Work on Stirling Engines

  4. Clean up.  At the end of class, everything must be cleaned up and put away.  Clean up and return your own items, and remind others to do the same.  At the end of class, all of us will have to work together to clean up unclaimed messes and put away unclaimed items (so don't leave messes, and keep an eye out for freeloaders).

    1. Growing Stirling engines are stored in the computer lab

    2. Raw materials (cardboard) should be neatly bundled, labeled, and stored in the correct stack in the back of the room.

 

 Homework:  

  • Study for quiz retake next class (unless you scored 11/12 or better).

  • Prepare to work on your Stirling Engine next class.  You may need to gather more tools and/or materials.

Class 66 Friday, 4/8/16
Warm-Up:

1.  Can you tie the basic fishing knot on the right?  If you have never tied it, get some string and try it.

2.  How can you tie a fixed loop on the end of a string?

Today's Agenda:  

 

  1. Quiz

  2. Enter group member names into the Stirling Engine Groups form.

  3. Show Mr. Stapleton your design sketch and materials list

  4. Brief Introduction to the tools

  5. Begin work.

  6. Clean up.  At the end of class, everything must be cleaned up and put away.  Clean up and return your own items, and remind others to do the same.  At the end of class, all of us will have to work together to clean up unclaimed messes and put away unclaimed items (so don't leave messes, and keep an eye out for freeloaders).

 

 Homework:  

  • Prepare to work on your Stirling Engine next class.  You may need to gather more tools and/or materials.

Schematic of the global sources of energy in 2010Class 65 Wednesday, 4/6/16
Warm-Up:

1.  What is a renewable resource?

2.  How much of our current energy use comes from renewable resources?

3.  At our current rate of consumption, how long will the World's oil last? one answer

4.  Where we get our power when all of the oil is gone? other resources

Today's Agenda:  

 

  1. Turn in homework and discuss

  2. Check your grades.  Make sure your rock dating test is in the correct quarter.

  3. Stirling Engines

    1. Choose Partner

    2. Make a plan

      1. Labeled Sketches

      2. Materials list -- with provider's name

 

 Homework:  

  • Quiz next class over atoms and isotopes notes and homework.

Class 64 Monday, 4/4/16
Warm-Up:

What are isotopes?


Today's Agenda:  

  1. Check and review homework.

  2. Rock dating test -- 2nd try

  3. Into which quarter would you like your rock dating test to go?

  4. Isotopes and Atoms -- the part we skipped in the rock dating packet.

  5. Stirling Engine Project

    1. Begin bringing materials

    2. Create a plan by next class -- and choose a partner (or work alone)

    3. Begin building by Friday

    4. You can expect three classes of build time

    5. Goal -- to create a stirling engine that a) works  b) produces the most electricity (video example)

    6. Provided materials:  cardboard (in the recycling), aluminum flashing, steel wool, wire, hot glue, wood (for clamp), screws, fishing line, saw, dremel, can opener, balloons, heat source, epoxy, metal cutting tool (of some sort)

    7. Recommended materials to gather:  empty cans -- soup, soda, shaving cream, hair spray, bug spray...  other stuff

 

 Homework:  

  • "Atoms/Isotopes" practice sheet.

Class 63 Wednesday, 3/31
Warm-Up:
1.  In the game on the right, which items can be dated using Carbon, and which can be dated using Cranium?
2.  The probe says the rock has 82.3% of its Uranium atoms left.  What is the rock's approximate age?

Today's Agenda:  

  1. Check/review homework.

  2. Rock dating test -- first try.

 Homework:  

  • If you are not satisfied with your score on today's test, study for a test next class.

  • Create a labeled diagram of a Stirling Engine.  Explain how the Stirling Engine works.  Use the internet to research Stirling engines.  There are many different designs.  In your explanation of how the engine works, make sure that you describe what is happening when the displacer is in each of its opposite positions.

Class 62 Tuesday, 3/29
Warm-Up:
1.  What's the difference between a magnitude 8 earthquake and a magnitude 7 earthquake?
2.  If xy = z, then Logxz = y. 
a.  What is Log101,000?
b.  What is log264?
c.  What is log10107?
d.  What is log10109?
Richter scale

Today's Agenda:  

  1. Check homework

  2. A1/2:  how to determine % parent atoms

  3. Finish the practice test at the end of the handout.

  4. Additional Rock Record Test Review

 Homework:  

Class 61 Friday, 3/25
Warm-Up:
A snail is sliming its way toward the end of a log.  The snail is currently beginning Day 2 of its journey, starting out at a point 30 feet from the end of the log.  Each day, the snail covers half of the remaining distance to the log's end.  At this rate...

1.  ...the snail will reach a point one foot from the end of the log on day____?
2.  ...when will the snail reach the end of the log?
3.  ...how far from the end of the log was the snail at the beginning of day 1?
4.  ...in how many days (from now) will the snail be exactly 6 feet from the end of the log?

 

Today's Agenda:  

  1. Check homework (A1/2)

  2. Wrap-up relative dating

  3. Begin absolute dating

    1. Half-lives

    2. Radioactive Isotopes

    3. Supplemental graphs

 Homework:  

  • A1/2

    • Complete the U-238 portion of the radiometric dating tables ("An example of the decay of U-238 atoms")

    • Complete the "% U-238 Parent atoms vs. Age of Rock" graph.  Plot known points and sketch a smooth curve.  Use pencil!

  • A3/4 and A5/6

    • Complete the radioactive decay graphs of K-40 and C-14

    • Finish the rest of #s 8-18 on p. 7 of the rock dating handout.

 

Class 60 Monday, 3/21/2016 and Wednesday, 3/23
Warm-Up:
How can the person get to the oxygen tank before suffocating?

Today's Agenda:  

  1. Return Test

  2. Go to rink

    1. Dual push-off

    2. 2 person orbit

    3. Push off of wall

    4. Sand bag throw

    5. Deceleration

    6. Bike wheel

      1. Angular momentum and stability

      2. Conservation of momentum

    7. Other?

  3. Continue Rock dating

  4. Turn in solutions to worm problem.  solution

 Homework:  None

Class 59 Thursday, 3/15/2016

Warm-Up


Today's Agenda:  

  1. Test

  2. Rock dating Notes

 Homework:  Wear rink-appropriate clothes to next class.  We will be on the ice.

Class 58 Tuesday, 3/15/2016

The map below shows the age of crust from oldest (blue = 160-180 million years) to youngest (Red = 0-10 million years).

1.  What can you infer from this map?  2.  Do you see something that looks wrong?

Today's Agenda:  

  1. Check and finish the last section of the practice test.

  2. One more bit of test practice -- just the final test section.

 Homework:  Test on Thursday.  Study.  Practice drawing and/or visualizing all of the features of each plate boundary (and ocean hotspots).

Class 57 Friday, 3/10/2016

Yesterday, for the first time in several months, there was condensation on the school toilet pipes.
1.  What conditions cause water to condense on toilet pipes?
2.  Why has this not happened for several months?

Today's Agenda:  

  1. Touch base with people who do not have a grade for the experimental design project. Completed grades are in PowerSchool.

  2. Try the plate tectonics Phet simulation

  3. Complete the practice questions at the end of the notes  -- do not use notes on the first three sections.  For this practice, you may use notes on #21-30.

  4. Practice test?

 Homework:  Use your notes to complete the Practice test, #21-30.

Class 56 Wednesday, 3/9/2016

1.  The first two pictures below show a shield volcano and a composite volcano.  Which one contains more Felsic material? (Felsic magma has a higher viscosity)
2.  The third volcano is a cinder cone made of mafic material.  If the lava that formed the cinder cone is mafic, how is the cinder cone so steep? 
3.  What is a cinder?


Cinder Cone Volcano


Today's Agenda:  

  1. I haven't graded all of the retakes and re-dos.

  2. Draw plate boundary diagrams.  Learn about tectonic features.

  3. Break.

  4. Draw more plate boundary diagrams.

 Homework:  

  • Study the plate tectonics notes.  Focus on pages 1 and 3.

Class 55 Monday, 3/7/2016

Today's Agenda:  

  1. Mr. Stapleton is gone.

  2. Answer these questions while watching Birth of The Earth.  See directions for accessing this video, below.

  3. If there's time, watch the rest of National Geographic, Volcano!

Here's how to access the video...
  1. Go to the EHS home page and log in.
  2. Click the library tab (upper right)
  3. Click the video streaming link (left)
  4. Click classroom video on demand
  5. Open this link to Birth of The Earth

 Homework:  

Class 54 Thursday, 3/3/2016

Warm-Up:  

 

Why is the inside of Earth Hot?

 

Today's Agenda:  

  1. Missing tests and lab reports

  2. Return and discuss tests

  3. Return lab report feedback

  4. Break

  5. Notes:  Earth layers, Plate Tectonics

Mr. Stapleton gone next class -- Formation of The Earth

 

Homework:  

  • You may resubmit your lab report and get back half of the points you lost.  To be eligible for recouping points, you must resubmit your fixed lab report using the same form and turn-in your grading sheet (the one Mr. Stapleton gave you, indicating why you lost points) to the in-box.

  • If you would like to retake the test, sign up for Mr. Stapleton's flex block.

  • This will not be graded, but it would be a good idea -- review the ocean/ocean convergent plate boundaries from today's class.

Class 53 Friday, 2/19/2016

Warm-Up:  

 

1.  What do the following pairs of letters represent?

   RD   ST   ND

2.  Ben and Fred played 7 games of chess, and each won the same number of games.  There were no ties.  How was this possible?

3.  If two hours ago, it was as long after one oclock in the afternoon as it was before one oclock in the morning, what time would it be now?

 

Today's Agenda:  

  1. Test

  2. Time to share lab reports and fill out this form.

  3. Volcano!

Homework:  

Class 52 Wednesday, 2/17/2016

Warm-Up:  

 

1.  Why is the Earth's core so hot?

2.  One of the rocks on the right is basalt.  The other is granite.  Which is which?

3.  One rock is more common in the Earth's continental crust.  The other is more common in the Earth's ocean crust.  Guess where each is found.

 

Today's Agenda:  

  1. Return/discuss homework

  2. Experimental Design and Statistics Practice Test

  3. Volcano! ?

Homework:  

HBBClass 51 Monday, 2/15/2016

Warm-Up:  

 

What does "randomized double-blind placebo controlled" mean when it refers to a scientific investigation?

 

 

Today's Agenda:  

  1. Homework will be returned next class.

  2. How to make a histogram in Google Sheets.  Link to YouTube video showing how to do it.  Link to Google Sheets example histogram and table.

  3. Collect data and/or work on your lab report.

  4. Link to Online Statistical Tests

Handout lab report format.

 

 

Homework:  

  • Lab reports will be due next class.  You will have 15 minutes to share your lab report with Mr. Stapleton.  Share them with Mr. Stapleton and then fill out this form.

  • Review pages 1 and 2 of Experimental Design Notes

Class 50 Thursday, 2/11/2016

Warm-Up:  

 

How would you make a histogram from the squirrel and cat data on the right?

 

Today's Agenda:  

  1. Homework will be returned on Wednesday.

  2. How to make a histogram in Google Sheets.  Link to YouTube video showing how to do it.  Link to Google Sheets example histogram and table.

  3. Collect data and/or work on your lab report.

  4. Link to Online Statistical Tests

Handout lab report format.

 

 

Homework:  

  • Heed the deadlines below.  Many of you will need to work outside of class in order to finish on time.

  • Try to be finished collecting data in the first 30 minutes of class on Monday.

  • Lab reports will be due on Wednesday, 2/17.   Do not count on any work time during class Wednesday.

Class 49 Tuesday, 2/9/2016

Warm-Up:  

 

A scientific research paper is typically divided into sections.  What sections do you often find in a research paper?

 

Today's Agenda:  

  1. Turn in homework

  2. Finish giving/receiving feedback

  3. Collect data and/or work on your lab report.

Handout lab report format.

 

Links to web pages relating to lab reports:

 

Homework:  

  • Plan to be finished collecting data before the beginning of class on Monday.

  • Lab reports will be due on Wednesday, 2/17.

 

Class 48 Wednesday, 2/5/2016

Warm-Up:  

1.  What is science?  1  2

2.  What makes this a science class?

Today's Agenda: 

  • Give and receive feedback on experimental designs.  Feedback form.

  • Modify your experimental design, as needed.

  • Start homework?

 Homework:   Complete this experimental design practice exercise.  You can expect a future test over this type of process.

Class 47 Wednesday, 2/3/2016

Warm-Up:  

You may have noticed that T-Tests are meant to be used for data that are normally distributed

1.  What is a normal distribution?

2.  What causes data to have a normal distribution?

3.  What test can you use when you have no idea how the data are distributed?

Today's Agenda:   Inquiry -- Experimental Design and Statistics

Part 1

  1. Upload your experimental design video to your Google Drive.  Set your shared settings to anyone with a link  or CCSU...
  2. Paste your video link in this form and then fill out the rest of the form.
  3. Check your video link on this spreadsheet, to see if it works.
  4. People without videos will have to deliver an impromptu, in-person presentation.

Part 2 -- Give and receive feedback on experimental designs.

 Homework:   None

Class 46 Monday, 2/1/2016

Warm-Up:  

Suppose you are trying to find out which brand of paper towel is most absorbent.

1)  What are the independent and dependent variables for this question?
2)  Describe a good way to test absorbency.
3)  What are some variables that you will need to control?
4)  Is this the type of experiment where bias might come into play?
5)  The picture on the right references the "best" towel.  What makes a towel the best towel?

Today's Agenda:   Inquiry -- Experimental Design and Statistics

  1. A1/2 -- review homework
  2. Create a video of your materials and methods -- Experimental design video, Version 1.0
    • State your question
    • State your independent and dependent variables
    • Show/explain your method of collecting data.  Show yourself collecting two pieces of data (two numbers)
      • A number representing the dependent variable for the first variation of the independent variable
      • A number representing the dependent variable for the second variation of the independent variable
    • Show your the data that you collected, and explain what the numbers mean
    • Make sure that the video proves that you have controlled variables, measured precisely, reasoned logically, etc.
  3. Upload the video to your Google Drive.  Share it according to the directions in the link above.
  4. Paste your video link in this form and then fill out the rest of the form.

 Homework:   Video links must be uploaded  before the beginning of next class.

Class 45 Thursday, 1/28/2016

Warm-Up:  

The class performed experiments in which the dependent variable was reaction time.  List some variables that should have been controlled in those experiments.

Today's Agenda:   Inquiry -- Experimental Design and Statistics

  1. Review Homework.
  2. One-tailed vs two-tailed tests.
  3. What p ≤ 0.05 actually means -- and what it doesn't really mean.
  4. Complete this -- Experimental design video, Version 1.0
  5. Paste your link in this form and then fill out the rest of the form.

 Homework:

A1/2  -- Analyze one hypothesis and its accompanying data from page 2 of Using statistics to test hypotheses.

  1.  Write the alternate hypothesis.

  2. Write a null hypothesis for the alternate hypothesis

  3. Use a T-Test for independent means (statistical test link above) to determine the p-value of the null hypothesis.  State the p-value of the null hypothesis.

  4. Tell what this p-value means for the alternate hypothesis.  You should say something like "the p-value of ____ suggests that we must (accept or reject) the alternate hypothesis at a significance cutoff of 0.05.

Class 44 Tuesday, 1/26/2016

Warm-Up:  

Sherlock says this was an accident.
1.  Estimate the probability (% chance) that this was an accident.
2.  Estimate the probability that this was an intentional murder.

3.  If you flip a coin 20 times, is there any set of results that is very likely (e.g. above 95%)?
4.  If you flip a coin 20 times, is there any set of results that is very unlikely (e.g. below 5%)?

The cartoon was taken from The Cartoon Guide to Statistics, by Larry Gonick.

Today's Agenda:   Inquiry -- Experimental Design and Statistics

  1. Look at exams.
  2. Review Homework.
  3. Discuss example 2.
  4. Discuss reaction time investigations.
  5. Use statistics to determine significance of experimental result.  Click the following link to use an Online Statistical Test to analyze your data.  If your p ≤ 0.05, then your results are statistically significant (95% confidence).  Use one of these.
    1. T-Test for dependent means (same test subjects, different conditions, assumes normal distribution)
    2. T-Test for independent means (different test subjects, assumes normal distribution)
    3. Mann-Whitney U test  (different test subjects, makes no assumption about data distribution)

2013-2014 EPS 200 Inquiry Video Library

2014-2015 EPS 200 Experimental Design Video Library

 Homework:

A1/2 -- Brainstorm a list of at least 5 testable questions about a possible difference between two groups of data.

A3/4, A5/6 -- Analyze one hypothesis and its accompanying data from page 2 of Using statistics to test hypotheses.

  1.  Write the alternate hypothesis.

  2. Write a null hypothesis for the alternate hypothesis

  3. Use a T-Test for independent means (statistical test link above) to determine the p-value of the null hypothesis.  State the p-value of the null hypothesis.

  4. Tell what this p-value means for the alternate hypothesis.  Regardless of what I said in class, just keep it to "The p-value of ____ suggests that we must (accept or reject) the alternate hypothesis at a significance cutoff of 0.05.

Class 43 Friday, 1/22/2016

Warm-Up:  

1.  In a scientific investigation, do you intentionally change (vary) the independent variable or the dependent variable?

Identify the independent and dependent variable for each of the following questions.

2.  Does shaving cause hairs to grow back thicker?
3.  Do fisherman catch more fish when the moon is full?
4.  Do cats react differently to people with beards?
5.  Does listening to music during tests improve test scores?
6.  Does eating sugar make kids hyper?

Today's Agenda:   Inquiry -- Experimental Design

  1. Gather Course Recommendation Information, discuss science courses.
  2. Hand out Experimental Design Notes
  3. Conduct an experiment where the dependent variable is reaction time.  Compare two groups of 8.  These could be the same people in two different conditions or they could be different people.
  4. Click the following link to use an Online Statistical Test to analyze your data.  If your p ≤ 0.05, then your results are statistically significant (95% confidence).  Use one of these.
    1. T-Test for dependent means (same test subjects, different conditions)
    2. T-Test for independent means (different test subjects)
    3. Mann-Whitney U test  (different test subjects)
  5. Use statistics to determine significance of experimental results

 Homework:  

  • First, read the experimental design notes -- except for the part about statistics.  Second, read "example 1" (Mr. Peabody's experiment) on page 3 of the notes.  Find and categorize as many experimental design mistakes as you can.  You can circle and label them in the paragraph, or you can make a list at the bottom of the page.

  • Begin thinking of an experimental question

Class 42   Tuesday, 1/12/2016

Warm-Up:  

The Monsoon Effect is caused by the difference between the rates of heating and cooling of land and oceans.  Land has a lower specific heat, which means that it heats up and cools off more quickly than oceans.  The diagram on the right shows both a side view and a map view of a continent and the adjacent ocean.

1.  Is there an onshore or offshore (away from shore) breeze?

2.  Is there higher pressure over the continent or over the ocean?

3.  Is this summer or winter?

4.  Will this effect increase or decrease the precipitation on the land?

5.  Where in the world is there a very strong Monsoon Effect?

 

Today: 

  • Midterm review preparation
Class 41   Friday, 1/8/2016

Warm-Up:  

The tooth-like blue and red lines represent fronts, which are boundaries between masses of warm and cold air.  The sharp, blue teeth represent a cold front.  The dull, red teeth are a warm front.  In the picture, there are two masses of cold air and one mass of warm air. 

 

1.  Where is the warm air?

2.  Why are clouds forming?

3.  Why does the cold front produce a more violent storm?

4.  Locate the cold air, warm air, and clouds in the diagram below.

Today: 

Class 40   Wednesday, 1/6/2016

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/6b/Jetstreamconfig.jpgWarm-Up:  

1. Compare the jet streams on the right to the prevailing winds (far right).  What do you notice?

2.  What are jet streams?

3.  How do jet streams affect our weather?

 Link to Jet stream Animation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Today: 

  • A3/4 and 5/6 -- check homework
  • Add seasonal climates
  • Continue mapping climates
  • Practice quiz

Homework:   Work on practice quiz or midterm review

Class 39   Monday, 1/4/2016

Warm-Up:  

1)  Is the current relative humidity in this room high or low?  How can we measure it?

2)  During a Vermont summer, nights are cooler than days, but the difference in temperature is relatively small.  In dry climates, the air gets much colder at night -- even during the summer.  Why?

Today: 

  • Return the grande evaluation
  • A1/2 -- check homework
  • Continue mapping climates

Homework:  

  • A1/2 -- None
  • A3/4, A5/6 -- Complete Practice Map #2
Class 38   Monday, 12/21/2015

Warm-Up:  

1)  How often does El Nino occur?

2) What effect does El Nino typically have on the U. S. Economy?

3) If you're interested in learning more about El Nino, check out this website.

4)  Assuming that Santa has to make 108 million stops in 24 hours, how fast does he have to travel?

Today: 

Homework:  

  • A1/2 -- Practice map #2.  Do it tonight so you don't have homework over break.
  • A3/4, A5/6 -- None
Class 37   Thursday, 12/17/2015

Warm-Up:  

1.   What is El Nino?

2. How and why does El Nino affect the weather?

3.  Is failure a good thing?

Today: 

Homework:  

  • Quiz retake on Monday
Class 36   Tuesday, 12/15/2015

Warm-Up:  

1.  The Coriolis Effect causes flying objects to curve in relation to the position of the Earth.  Which way do objects curve in the Northern Hemisphere?  Southern Hemisphere?

2.  According to the Cyclone video, more than 99% of all Northern Hemisphere tornadoes swirl counter-clockwise.  Hurricanes swirl in the same direction as tornadoes.  Why?

Today: 

Homework:   None.  We will be using colored pencils.  If you want nice colored pencils, you should bring your own.  You will need colors for wet and dry climates and for warm and cold ocean currents.  Green, brown, red, and blue work well.

Class 35   Friday, 12/11/2015

Warm-Up:  

1.  Where should a quarterback throw the football if he wants to get it to the receiver in the top photograph?  Why?

2.  If the quarterback on in the picture is throwing to a stationary receiver, where should he throw the ball?  Why?

3.  You're standing on a scale model of the Earth, and the model Earth is rotating.  You're at the North Pole, and you're playing catch with a friend is at the equator.  How should you aim your throw to get it to your friend?

4.  How should your friend aim his/her throw to get it to you?

Today: 

Homework:   Study for Quiz/test next class.  Handouts are below.  Some answers are given.  There should be YouTube videos for all of these.

  1.  Humidity notes
  2.  Refrigerators, Air Conditioners, and Heat Pumps  link to answers
  3. heat pump diagram sheet
  4. Review Questions -- humidity and heat pumps Link to Answers
Class 34   Wednesday, 12/9/2015

Warm-Up:  

The graphics on the right show Stirling Engines. 
1.  How does a Stirling Engine work?
2.  How is a Stirling Engine the opposite of a heat pump?
Animated Engines
soda can
soda can 2
single cylinder

Today: 

  • Check/discuss homework --
  • Finish Cyclone
  • Project or Mapping Climate Features?

Homework:   Review Questions -- humidity and heat pumps -- Read them all, but you only have to complete at least half of them for credit.  Quiz/Test next Tuesday.

Class 33   Monday, 12/7/2015

Warm-Up:  

Herman takes a hot shower every morning during the winter.  Herman has tried stepping out of the shower to dry off, and he has tried toweling off inside the shower, with the shower curtain closed.  Herman has discovered that he stays much warmer when he dries off before leaving the closed shower.  All other things being equal, why is it better to dry off inside the shower if you want to stay warm?

Today: 

Homework:   Complete heat pump diagram sheet


Class 32   Thursday, 12/3/2015

Warm-Up:  

The rate at which air's temperature changes as it rises or sinks is called the "adiabatic lapse rate."  The "dry" rate refers to air that has less than 100% relative humidity.  The "wet" rate applies to air that is saturated (100% rh).

Why does rising saturated air cool down more slowly than rising dry air?

Today: 

Homework:  

  1. Complete questions about  Refrigerators, Air Conditioners, and Heat Pumps
  2. Extra credit for finding a definitive answer to this question... in the screen shot below (click thumbnail), why does the dewpoint follow the air temperature, both up and down?  A high quality answer will be worth 3% added to your quarter grade.

Class 31   Tuesday, 12/1/2015

Warm-Up:  

Today: 

Homework:   A1/2 -- Finish Humidity questions through #19.

Class 30   Friday, 11/20/2015

Warm-Up:  

1.  How does a wetsuit keep swimmers warm?  It doesn't keep them dry. 

2.  What is the primary cause of windchill?

Today: 

  • Hot Air Balloon Winner Prize Ceremony:  Grady Corkum & Chris Labonte -- Mass lifted = 33g
  • Test
  • Silence
  • Game

Homework:   None

Class 29   Wednesday, 11/18/2015

Warm-Up:  

1.  A man once won a bet that he could blow 100 smoke rings with one breath of smoke.  How did he do it?
2.  How does a vortex ring form?

slow motion vortex ring
wikipedia
dolphins blowing bubble rings

Today: 

  • Check/discuss homework
  • Slink Psychrometer Activity.  Find the relative humidity inside the classroom, and outside of the main entrance to the school.

Homework:   Test next class over...

  1. Basic Chemistry and Cloud Formation Notes -- Filled in version from last year
  2. Test review-- Filled in version There will be some questions from the notes that are not on the test review!
Class 28   Monday, 11/16/2015

Warm-Up:  

1)  How does a thermos prevent heat transfer by conduction, convection, and radiation?

2)  Is a thermos (and other insulators) better at keeping things warm or keeping things cool?

3)  The current weather forecast is shown below.  The black line represents air pressure.  The red line is temperature, and blue is chance of precipitation.  Dark and light regions represent night and day.  What patterns do you notice?

Today: 

Homework:   Complete the Test review

Class 27   Thursday, 11/12/2015

Warm-Up:  

Why does the bird keep drinking?

Today: 

  • MT pics
  • Check/discuss simulation answers
  • Make clouds in bottles
  • Tests, Projects, and grades
    • symptoms vs causes
    • 3 ways to look at our hot air balloons.
    • If you plan to retake the spreadsheet test, you need to practice and become fast enough to finish in a flex block.  That gives you about 20 minutes (factoring in startup time).
    • What is a teacher's role?  What can you learn from this spreadsheet test?
  •  Simulation links:

Homework:   Finish the "cloud formation at the equator" page of the chemistry and cloud formation notes.

5366748_orig.jpg (640×442)Class 26   Tuesday, 11/10/2015

Warm-Up:  

1.  What is dry ice?

2.  What is in the fog that is produced when dry ice is mixed with water?

3.  Why does this fog sink in air?

Today: 

  1. Turn in the homework
  2. Test retake -- required for anyone who did not score 80% or better last time.
    • Open the correct test.
    • Make a copy.  Rename it "[your name] balloon test retake"
    • Complete the spreadsheet.
    • Share it with me and include an email message letting me know that you have shared it.
  3. Complete these Phet simulation questions

Homework:  

  • Finish #3, above, if you didn't finish in class.

 

Class 25   Wednesday, 11/6/2015

Warm-Up:  

1.  Sometimes you can "see your breath."  Why can't you see it right now?

I know a way to make my breath visible right now.  Can you guess how I do it?

2.  *What is air made of? 

Today: 

  1. Cloud Formation Notes -- Filled in version from last year
    1. Basic chemistry terms  (atoms, molecules, phase change simulation)
    2. Heat, temperature and phase change
    3. Adiabatic change
    4. Make a cloud in a bottle
  2. Next class -- meet in the library computer lab for test retakes and/or gas law simulations.  If you are retaking the test, you may need to complete the gas law simulations at home or on a school computer outside of class time.

Homework:  

  1. Complete the Practice Questions:  Basic Chemistry and the Basis of Cloud Formation
  2. Balloon presentations are due by midnight tonight. 10% will be deducted from presentations that are up to one week late.
  3. If you do not have a grade for the spreadsheet test in PowerSchool, prepare for a retake next class.  You may not use any of the spreadsheets that I have given you with green highlighted cells.  Those include the practice test and the first three versions of the test.  You may use notes, internet, or any other files that you have created by yourself. This will be the only in-class retake. 
Class 24   Wednesday, 11/4/2015

Warm-Up:  

The hot air balloon on the right is typical of the hot air balloons that we have been flying in the classroom.  Based on our experience yesterday, while this type of design works well in the classroom, it will not fly outside.

1.  Why do you think this balloon will not perform well outside?

2.  What can be done to modify the balloon so that it will fly outside?

3.  What indoor flight restrictions may not apply to outdoor flights?

Today: 

  1. After today, we will not be working on balloons in class.  Due to my mistake, your Google Slides presentation will be due on Friday.
  2. Work time
    1. Modify balloons for outdoor flight
    2. Other -- depends upon your needs
  3. Fly balloons outside
  4. Dismantle balloons or take them home.  You may be able to fuel them with hand sanitizer.

Homework:  

  •  Finish your Google Slides presentation.  Fill out the submission form (with a pasted link) by Friday.
  • Prepare to retake the spreadsheet hot air balloon test on Tuesday.
Class 23   Monday, 11/2/2015

Warm-Up:  

  1. What is in clouds?  Are they solid, liquid, or gas? 

  2. Why don't clouds fall?

  3. If you shot a gun straight up into the air and the projectile fell down on your head, would you be seriously injured?

  4. What is terminal velocity?

  5. Will a tiny lead sphere and a large lead sphere fall at the same rate?

  6. Suppose you have a cube with 1cm edges.  If you enlarge the cube, what changes fastest as the cube grows -- its height, it's surface area, or its volume?

terminal velocities of spheres

Today: 

  1. Spreadsheet test retakes will probably be next Tuesday. This depends on availability of the computer lab.
  2. The shop vac has been found.  You can now measure fill time.  If you already used an estimated volume without using the shop vac, you are not required to remeasure your ballon volume.
  3. Wrap up balloon launches and work on Google Slides presentations.  Google Slides presentations are due by Wednesday.  Also, just to be clear, the data on your Balloon Data sheet of your presentation will be graded on correctness.  Remember that you can use a spreadsheet for your calculations -- if it is correct.
    1. To create your presentation, make a copy of the revised hot air balloon template and modify it with your data and thoughts. 
    2. Remember that Groups of 3 must create narrated Google Slides presentations.  Google “add narration to google slides” to find out how.  Here’s a link to a how-to video for adding narration using the Snagit extension in Google Chrome.
  4. If you want to fly your balloon outside on Wednesday, fix any holes and make sure that the fuel platform won't drip. 

Homework:   Finish your Google Slides presentation.  Fill out the submission form (with a pasted link) by Friday.

Class 22   Thursday, 10/29/2015

Warm-Up:   The picture on the right represents atoms, molecules, and elements.

  1. How many atoms are shown in the picture on the right?

  2. How many elements?

  3. How many molecules?

  4. Guess what type of atoms, molecules, and elements are supposed to be represented by the figures.

Today: 

  1. Discuss Tests
    1. Correct answers have been added to the spreadsheets. 
    2. Rubrics will be returned for Rhino files.
    3. Grades are in PowerSchool.  Your spreadsheet score is currently counting only if it is 80% or better.  Anyone can choose to either count or drop the spreadsheet score -- for now.  If you drop the score, you will have to retake the test, and it will count toward your second quarter grade.
    4. I have made the spreadsheet practice test directions video public once again.  Here is the practice test, and here is the video showing how to enter all of the formulas on the practice test.
    5. FYI, the spreadsheet test grade distribution is shown below.
  2. Wrap up balloon launches and work on Google Slides presentations.  Google Slides presentations are due by next Wednesday.  Also, just to be clear, the data on your Balloon Data sheet of your presentation will be graded on correctness.  Remember that you can use a spreadsheet for your calculations -- if it is correct.
    1. If you don't know what is expected for the Google Slides presentation, spend some time looking over the revised template, complete with helpful comments.  To make your own presentation, just copy the template and modify it with your data and thoughts. 
    2. Remember that Groups of 3 must create narrated Google Slides presentations.  Google “add narration to google slides” to find out how.  Here’s a link to a how-to video for adding narration using the Snagit extension in Google Chrome. 

Homework:   Work on your Google Slides presentation.  It's due next Wednesday.

Class 21   Tuesday, 10/27/2015

Warm-Up: 

Why is it important to enter formulas into a spreadsheet, rather than just typing correct answers into the "output" cells?

Today: 

  1. Test in computer lab.
  2. If you have not turned in your Evaluating Hot Air Balloon Shapes sheet, turn it in by next class.

Thursday:  Wrap up balloon launches and work on Google Slides presentations.  Google Slides presentations are due by Wednesday.  Also, just to be clear, the data on your Balloon Data sheet of your presentation will be graded on correctness.

Homework:  If you don't know what is expected for the Google Slides presentation, spend some time looking over the revised template, complete with helpful comments.  To make your own presentation, just copy the template and modify it with your data and thoughts.  [Remember that Groups of 3 must create narrated presentations.  Google “add narration to google slides” to find out how.  Here’s a link to a how-to video for adding narration using the Snagit extension in Google Chrome.]

Class 20   Friday, 10/23/2015

No Warm-up today.  Mr. Stapleton is in the Missouri Breaks of Montana.  He will be going to look at these elk tonight.   They are off limits to hunting, but they're fun to watch -- and fun to hear when the bulls are bugling.

Scroll down to last class (#18) for today's directions.



 

Class 19   Wednesday, 10/21/2015

Warm-Up:  Brainteasers...

1. What 5-letter word does every educated person pronounce wrong?
2. Forward I'm heavy; backward I'm not.  What am I?
3. There are three misteaks in thi sentence.  Identify them.

Today: 

  1. Everybody open the spreadsheet and check it out.  If I haven't already added them to your sheet, you can copy the blue cells from this spreadsheet and paste them on cell E16.
  2. Quiz retake -- If you have not had a decent score already, you must retake this today or you will have a zero until Mr. Stapleton returns next week.
  3. Continue tracing, cutting/sealing, and constructing of balloons.
  4. Fly balloons and collect data.
  5. Even if you don't get to fly today, collect as much information as you can so that you can work on your Google Slides presentation next class.

Friday:  Mr. Stapleton is gone.  Class in the library computer lab.

  1. **If you open Rhino and don't have the proper toolbars, this video shows you how to restore the toolbars.
  2. If you still have not scored 100% on the hot air balloon quiz, this scan might be helpful.  It shows my solution to the last quiz.
  3. Spend time in the library preparing for Tuesday's test. The test will be open-note and open-web, but I will be removing my instructional videos from YouTube.
  4. If you have extra time, work on your Google Slides presentation.  Here is the revised template, complete with helpful comments.  Make a copy and modify it with your data and thoughts.  You will also have time to complete the presentation after the test next week.  Remember that Groups of 3 must create narrated presentations.  Google “add narration to google slides” to find out how.  Here’s a link to one how-to video for adding narration using the Snagit extension in Google Chrome.

Tuesday:  Test in library computer lab.  Mr. Stapleton is back.

Thursday:  Wrap up balloon launches and work on Google Slides presentations.  Presentations are due by ???

Homework:  You might want to get a head start on test preparation.  You can create some notes for yourself.

Class 18   Monday, 10/19/2015

Warm-Up:

The density of air changes from day to day.  What factors affect the density of air?

Today: 

  1. Discuss Homework.  If you didn't complete it, complete it before next class.
  2. Quiz retake today or next class
  3. Continue tracing, cutting/sealing, and constructing of balloons.
  4. Collect balloon data
    1. Empty mass (estimate fuel mass at point of maximum lift -- density is approximately 1g/ml)
    2. Fill time [Fill rate is actually closer to 0.14m3/s.s]
    3. Room termperature at time of launch (thermometer)
    4. Air pressure at time of launch.

Homework:  If you did not complete the homework for last class, complete it.  For this assignment, you can still get credit.

Filling-Balloon.jpg (594×395)Class 17   Thursday, 10/15/2015

Warm-Up:

Felix Baumgartner jumped from a helium-filled balloon at an altitude of 135,890 feet.  Why was his balloon so loosely inflated?

Today: 

  1. Quiz
  2. Seating shift in A3/4
  3. The Next Week's Plan
  4. How to do tonight's homework.
  5. If you haven't done this already, finish and turn-in "Evaluating Hot Air Balloon Shapes"
  6. In Rhino, finalize your balloon shape and lay it out on a 6'x9' virtual sheet of plastic.    Here are the directions...
  7. Upload your file to the appropriate folder...
  8. Begin tracing, cutting/sealing, and constructing of balloons.

Homework:  Make a copy of this spreadsheet.  Re-save it with your name in the title.  Complete it by entering formulas.  Then share it with jstapleton@ccsuvt.org.  Here's a step-by-step video showing how to do this.

Class 16   Thursday, 10/8/2015

Warm-Up:

1.  Which balloon is heavier -- or do they have the same weight?

2.  What is the mass of the hot air inside each balloon?

3.  If you had only an understanding of density -- and no understanding of Archimedes' Principle -- you could still solve this problem.  How?

4.  If you scale up the height of a 3-D object by a factor of 4, what does that do to the object's surface area?  What about its volume?

Today: 

  1. Finish "Evaluating Hot Air Balloon Shapes"
  2. In Rhino, finalize your balloon shape and lay it out on a 6'x9' virtual sheet of plastic.  Here are the directions...
  3. Begin tracing, cutting/sealing, and constructing of balloons.

Homework:  Prepare for a short quiz next class.  There will just be one question.  Partial credit may be awarded if you clearly show your work.  Click here for an example question and answer.

Class 15   Tuesday, 10/6/2015

Warm-Up:

1.  What is the formula for density?

2.  How can the triangle on the right be used to represent this equation?

3.  Rearrange the density formula to solve for mass.  Mass = _____.

4.  Rearrange the density formula to solve for volume.  Volume = _____.

Today: 

  1. Finding the density of the hot air in a balloon.  Balloon Problems.
  2. Complete "Evaluating Hot Air Balloon Shapes"

Homework:  Hot air Balloon Problems set 3.

Class 14   Friday, 10/2/2015

Warm-Up:

1.  Geometrically speaking, what is a Net?

2.  How does a hot air balloon work?
3.  How does the pilot control altitude (height)?
4.  How does the pilot control direction?

Today: 

  • 1)  Return 3-D Printed Parts
  • 2) Tentative Balloon Project Guidelines
  • 3) Return tests, except in A5/6
  • 4) Use CAD (Computer Aided Design) software to print parts that you can cut out and form into a 3-D shape. 
    • You might want to arrange your pieces so that you don't have to cut all of the edges.  If you lay your pieces out right, some edges can just be creased.  You will be making a net.
    • Print your shape on cardstock (thick, colored paper).
      • When you're looking at the Rhino viewports, click somewhere in the "TOP" window.
      • Click Print
      • Select the printer for this room (probably Everest C113)
      • Click the + sign on the View and Output Scale tab
        • Click Extents
        • Under the Scale tab, choose Scale to Fit
      • Near the top of the window select either Portrait or Landscape
      • If necessary, close the print window and rearrange your pieces
      • Click Print
    •  Cut out and assemble your shape.
  • 4) Complete "Evaluating Hot Air Balloon Shapes"

Homework:  None, unless you want to work on the your hot air balloon design.  The library computers all have Rhino.

Class 13   Wednesday, 9/30/2015

Warm-Up:

What happens when you put something in a glass bell jar (pictured on right) and pump the air out of the jar?  What would happen with...

1. Marshmallows?
2.  Balloons?
3.  Water?

Today: 

  • Test retake.  Anyone who is not taking the test is welcome to make a small object for 3-D Printing.  If you create something, email me  (jstapleton@ccsuvt.org) your file.
  • Use CAD (Computer Aided Design) software to create hot air balloon prototypes. 
    • You might want to arrange your pieces so that you don't have to cut all of the edges.  If you lay your pieces out right, some edges can just be creased.  You will be making a net.
    • Print your shape on cardstock (green paper).
      • Click Print
      • Select the printer for this room (probably Everest C113)
      • Click the + sign on the View and Output Scale tab
        • Click Extents
        • Under the Scale tab, choose Scale to Fit
      • Near the top of the window select either Portrait or Landscape
      • If necessary, close the print window and rearrange your pieces
      • Click Print
    •  Cut out and assemble your shape.

Homework:  

  • None
Class 12   Monday, 9/28/2015

Warm-Up:

1.  A jet of air can be used to levitate a ping-pong ball.  The most curious thing about this is that the position of the ball in the jet of air remains fairly stable.  The ball is attracted to the jet of air.  What does this tell you about the pressure of fast-flowing air?

2. What happens if you add a backward funnel to the hose and try this with a balloon?

Photo credit: Fred Espenak3.  Did you see the lunar eclipse?  Why did it happen?  Why was the moon red?

Today: 

  • Fruit snacks for winners.
  • Finish James Cameron's Deep Sea Challenge
  • Use CAD (Computer Aided Design) software to create hot air balloon prototypes.  The prototypes will be made from laser-cut folder paper.
    • Create a virtual 4" x 4" x 4" cube, using Rhino.
    • Save your file in your personal drive.  If your name is Bubba, name it Bubba Balloon Prototype.
    • Create a hot air balloon shape that is about the same size or smaller than the cube.
    • Unroll your surfaces.  If they won't unroll, you need to change your design.  Double-curved surfaces won't unroll.
    • Create a virtual piece of folder paper that is 16" x 11"
      • Organize your surfaces on your virtual folder paper.
      • If necessary, scale (shrink) your surfaces to fit on the paper.
    • Add a text block with your initials and then explode it.
    • Save your file again.
    • Upload your file to the appropriate folder:

Homework:  

  • No new homework
  • If you would like to retake the test on Wednesday, study for the test.  Study your notes, the practice test, and the first test.  It would be a good idea to print clean copies of these items so that you can use them to test yourself.
Class 11   Thursday, 9/24/2015

Warm-Up:

A piece of foam floating in a glass jar usually wants to move to the side of the jar.  Why?  How can you get the foam to want to stay in the middle?

Today: 

  • Return Test
  • James Cameron's Deep Sea Challenge
  • A34 and A56-- results of archimedes challenge -- and winners

Homework:  

  • No new homework
  • If you would like to retake the test on Wednesday, study for the test.  Study your notes, the practice test, and the first test.  It would be a good idea to print clean copies of these items so that you can use them to test yourself.
Class 10   Tuesday, 9/22/2015

Warm-Up:

The fall equinox is supposed to arrive at 4:21 AM tomorrow.  What does that mean?

Today: 

  • Test
  • James Cameron's Deep Sea Challenge
  • Next class -- results of archimedes challenge -- and winners

Homework:  None

Class 9   Friday, 9/18/2015

Warm-Up: 

  1. Do things move from areas of high pressure to areas of low pressure, or do they move from low pressure to high pressure?  Can you support your answer with an example?

  2. Do you know how to siphon?

  3. Do you know how siphoning works?

  4. Why won't siphoning work on the moon?

  5. What is a "water level?"

  6. How does a toilet work?

Today: 

  • Warm-up
  • Check homework
  • Finish Archimedes Challenge
  • Review Practice Test
  • Video -- James Cameron's Deepsea Challenge

Handouts: 

Homework:  Study -- Test next class.

 

Class 8   Wednesday, 9/16/2015

Warm-Up: 
Examine the mercury barometer on the right. 
 
1.  Do you understand how it works? 

2.  If you were given some mercury, a long test tube, and a bowl, could you make one? [Unfortunately, Hg is toxic, so if you find a bunch, please don't actually try this.]

3.  Why is the vacuum at the top important?  What is a vacuum?

4. 
If this barometer were made using water instead of mercury, would the tube need to be longer or shorter?

Today: 

  • Warm-up
  • Check/Review Homework
  • Work time:
    • Return the submarine assignment.  Time to fix it up.  Re-submit it if you want. ** Note about "density decreasing."
    • Finish archimedes challenge.
    • Work on practice test

Handouts:  Practice Test

Homework:  Practice Test

 

File:Bathyscaphe Trieste.jpgClass 7   Monday, 9/14/2015

Warm-Up: 

Until recently, the Bathyscaphe Trieste (shown on the right) was the only manned vessel to have reached the deepest part of the ocean.  Except for the spherical "pressure chamber" on the bottom of the Trieste, most of the vessel was filled with gasoline.  The pointy "hoppers" on the bottom were filled with bits of iron that could be released by the pilots.  The vessel had no motor.  In 2012, James Cameron (moviemaker etc.) dove even deeper in a much smaller submarine, the Deepsea Challenger.

  1. Where is the deepest part of the ocean?
  2. How deep is it?
  3. Geologically speaking, why is that part of the ocean so deep?
  4. What are the dangers of traveling that deep?
  5. Why did the Trieste sink, and once it got to the bottom, what made it float back up?
  6. Why was the main portion of the Trieste filled with gasoline?

Today: 

  • Warm-up
  • Check/Review Homework
  • A1/2 and A3/4 -- Complete #9 in notes.
  • A3/4, complete computer steps from last class
  • A1/2 -- did you measure your pressure?
  • Work time:
    • Return the submarine assignment.  Time to fix it up.  Re-submit it if you want. ** Note about "density decreasing."
    • Work on homework
  • Finish notes
  • Archimedes challenge. Determine the densities of foam and metal spheres using only the following materials
    • Foam (up to about 4 inches)
    • Spheres (up to 7)
    • Foam Cutter
    • Overflow cup
    • Plastic beakers -- medium and small
    • Plastic graduated cylinders -- medium and small
    • Water (assume density = 1g/cm3 = 1g/ml

Handouts:  Air Pressure, Part 2 (Archimedes Principle)

Homework:  Buoyancy Questions

 

Class 6   Thursday, 9/10/2015

Warm-Up:  

Suppose there is a freshwater iceberg floating in a freshwater lake.  If no water is lost to evaporation, seepage, etc., what will happen to the surface level of the lake when the iceberg melts?  Will it rise, sink, or stay the same.  Why?

Today: 

  • Warm-up
  • Air Pressure, Part 2 (Archimedes Principle)
  • Practice problem (#8)
  • On a computer, open up...
    • This list
    • The filled-in version of the air pressure notes (part 1)
    • Powerschool, and look at your grades for this class.  In order to see your individual assignments, you will have to click on your number grade.  Check your submarine assignment to see if you need to finish it.  *Show Mr. Stapleton that you were able to do this.
    • The YouTube video for EPS 200 Air Pressure Notes, Part 1
  • Work time:
    • Return the submarine assignment.  Time to fix it up.  Re-submit it if you want. ** Note about "density decreasing."
    • Work on homework

Handouts:

Homework:  

Class 5   Tuesday, 9/8/2015

Warm-Up:  

1.  Suppose you want to search an area of the ocean for lobsters.  You don't have a scuba tank, so you will be using a snorkel.  You want to be as deep as possible, so you would like to use as long a snorkel as possible.  Is there a limit on how long snorkels should be?  If so, what is it?

2.  Suppose you're standing on a balcony, and you want to steal the drink of someone standing below.  You carefully lower a tube into the drink and suck up the liquid before anyone notices.  Could this really work?  Explain.

3.  What's the current relative humidity?  What does relative humidity mean?

Today: 

Handouts:

Homework:  Air pressure questions

Class 4   Thursday, 9/3/2015

Warm-Up:  

1.  What would happen if you made a hole through the center of the Earth, and you jumped in?  (antipodes map)

2.  The formula on the right calculates the force of gravity between two objects.  m1 is the mass of the first object; m2 is the mass of the second object; d is the distance between their centers, and G is a constant (number that never changes).

a.  According to the formula, what would happen to your weight if your mass were doubled?

b.  What would happen to your weight if the Earth's mass were doubled?

c.  What would happen to your weight if your distance to the Earth's center were doubled?

Excel spreadsheet -- falling through the earth

Today: 

  • Warm-up -- you don't have to write them down, but some may show up on tests or quizzes.
  • Quiz
  • Turn-in submarine procedures -- if you haven't already
  • Air pressure notes

Handouts: Air pressure Notes, part 1

Homework:  None

Class 3   Tuesday, 9/1/2015
Warm-Up: 
A balloon is filled with air, and a string is used to tie a rock to the balloon.  As the diagram on the right shows, the balloon and rock float at the surface of a lake.  However, when they are pulled to the bottom, they stay there.  When they are returned to the surface, they once again float. 

How can this happen?  Consider mass, volume, density, and weight.

Today: 

  • Warm-up -- you don't have to write them down, but some may show up on tests or quizzes.
  • Note:  last class' stuff is on YouTube.
  • Turn in signed course expectations slips.
  • Check and review homework -- properties of matter practice.
  • Practice quiz (If you like your score, you can keep it.)
  • Finish and turn-in submarine procedures.  Try two in front of class.
  • Air pressure notes

Handouts: Air pressure Notes, part 1

Homework:  

  • Real quiz next class, similar to today's practice quiz.
    • Study by reviewing the notes and today's quiz.  Cover your answers to quiz yourself.
  • Air pressure stuff?
Class 2   Friday, 8/26/2015
Warm-Up: 
This bottle on the right contains a "cartesian diver."  The diver dives when the bottle is squeezed, and the diver rises when the bottle is released.

1.  As
the bottle is squeezed, what is happening to the diver's density, volume, and mass?
2.  Why are those properties changing in those ways?

Today: 

  • Warm-up
  • Turn in signed course expectations slips.
  • Check and review homework -- properties of matter practice.
  • Continue properties of matter practice.
  • Film Canister Submarines.  When you're done, start on the homework.  Some groups' procedures will be read and followed to see if they work (extra 5% if the procedure works).

Handouts:  None

Homework:  

  • Finish the the properties of matter sheet through number 24.
  • Practice quiz next class
Class 1  Wednesday 8/26/2015
Warm-Up: 
  1. If the Earth suddenly stopped rotating (spinning), what would happen?
  2. What if it stopped revolving (orbiting)?
  3. How can one wooden block can cast a shadow with any of the shapes below -- and how is this question related to EPS?

Today: 

  • Warm-up
  • Fill out student info sheets
  • Enter attendance
  • Slideshow
  • Course Expectations and class topics
  • Upcoming topics -- density (which things sink/float), pressure and buoyancy (why/how objects float) , hot air balloon project -- lift the most weight and determine temperature without a thermometer.
  • Properties of matter practice
  • Clean up, answer to shadow question, etc.

Handouts:

Homework:  

  • [Graded on completion/effort, not correctness] Complete properties of matter sheet through # 13.
  • Have your parent(s)/guardian(s) review the course expectations and fill out the sheet. Turn in just the signature.
Class 0  Tuesday 8/25/2015 (15 minute class) 935-950, 955-1010, 1015-1030
Warm-Up: 

Can you point to the North Pole?

Today: 

  • Start learning names -- watch Mr. Stapleton study.
  • Warm-up
  • Attendance
  • Course topics

Homework:  None