Class 64 Friday, 4/19/2018

Warm-Up:   The best way to test the efficacy of medical treatments is to use a randomized double blind placebo controlled study (RDBPC study).  What do these words mean, and why is this the best way to study medical treatments?

Today's Agenda:  

  1. Quiz
  2. Finish and submit lab reports.
    1. Lab reports are due today.  If you want to ensure the most prompt grading, turn in your lab report today.
    2. The deadline for submitting lab reports with no point deduction is May 1st.  After that, you may still submit your lab report, but points will be deducted.
    3. If your lab report is not ready to be graded by the end of class, insert a new slide at the beginning of your slideshow.  On that slide, create a note saying something like "not complete -- please do not grade."
  3. If time permits, begin sharing results.

 Homework:  None (unless you have not finished your investigation and slideshow.)

Class 64 Wednesday, 4/18/2018

Warm-Up:   Do you agree with Sherlock?  Why or why not?

Today's Agenda:  

  1. Use this lab report template to guide your investigation. 
  2. Here is the link to the Online Statistical Tests
  3. Plan for the week:
    1. Monday:
      1. Design your experiment and collect Data. 
      2. Copy the lab report template above and rename it with your name(s).  If you have a partner, share it with your partner.  Also share it with jstapleton@ewsd.org
      3. Fill out this experimental design project form.  In the form, you will need to paste a link to your slideshow.
    2. Today Finish data collection.  Conduct statistical test.  Write lab report.
    3. Friday:  Short quiz.  Finish and submit lab report.  If there's time, present your findings.

 Homework:  

Class 63 Monday, 4/16/2018

Warm-Up:  

1.  What is the chance of a ball making it all of the way to the left-most side of the quincunx?  Why?

2.  What is the chance of a ball making it to either the far left side or the far right side of the quincunx?  Why?

3.  What do these answers tell us about one-tailed and two-tailed tests?

Today's Agenda:  

  1. Use this lab report template to guide your investigation. 
  2. Here is the link to the Online Statistical Tests
  3. Plan for the week:
    1. Today:
      1. Design your experiment and collect Data. 
      2. Copy the lab report template above and rename it with your name(s).  If you have a partner, share it with your partner.  Also share it with jstapleton@ewsd.org
      3. Fill out this experimental design project form.  In the form, you will need to paste a link to your slideshow.
    2. Wednesday:  Finish data collection.  Conduct statistical test.  Write lab report.
    3. Friday:  Short quiz.  Finish and submit lab report.  If there's time, present your findings.

 Homework:  

Class 62 Thursday, 4/12/2018

Warm-Up:  

You may have noticed that T-Tests are meant to be used for data that are normally distributed

1.  What is a normal distribution?

2.  What causes data to have a normal distribution?

3.  What is a quincunx?  How does one work?

4.  What test can you use when you have no idea how the data are distributed?

Today's Agenda:   Inquiry -- Experimental Design

  1. Practice quiz over Experimental Design Notes.
  2. In the same pairs as yesterday, read other groups' lab reports and give them feedback.  Discuss them as a class.
  3. A7/8 -- Read Mr. Stapleton's example investigation. Eye color and reaction time -- The Dickey Amendment is the one that I was mentioning yesterday.
  4. Create your own experimental question for another investigation.  You may work alone or with one partner.  This investigation will be graded as a project.  Begin thinking about your procedure.  Do some practice sampling to refine your procedure before collecting your actual data.

 Homework:  

  • Think of a good experimental question that you can investigate.  This question must have a clear manipulated and a responding variable that requires some type of measurement.  The investigation must result in data that can be analyzed using one of the three statistical tests that we have used so far.  Online Statistical Test

Class 61 Wednesday, 4/11/2018

Warm-Up:  

1.  What is science?  1  2
2.  What makes this a science class?
3.  Can there really such a things as political science and social science?  Explain.

Today's Agenda:   Inquiry -- Experimental Design

  1. Check and discuss homework -- Mr. Peabody's investigation in Experimental Design Notes.
  2. Pick out problems in a second investigation -- the foot smoothness investigation.
  3. In the same pairs as yesterday, read other groups' lab reports and give them feedback.  Discuss them as a class.
  4. Read Mr. Stapleton's example investigation. Eye color and reaction time

 

 Homework:  

  • Read the rest of Experimental Design Notes.  Last night you did not have to read the statistics part.  Tonight you do.  We will have a practice quiz tomorrow over the content of the notes.

Class 60 Tuesday, 4/10/2018

Warm-Up:  

Scientific investigations involve manipulated, responding, and controlled variables.

1.  Describe the role each type of variable plays in an investigation.
2.  What are some other names for the manipulated variable and the responding variable?


For each of the following investigative questions, identify the manipulated variable, responding variable and one important controlled variable.
3.  Does shaving cause hairs to grow back thicker?
4.  Do fisherman catch more fish when the moon is full?
5.  Do cats react differently to people with beards?
6.  Does listening to music during tests improve test scores?
7.  Does eating sugar make kids hyper?


Today's Agenda:   Inquiry -- Experimental Design

  1. Hand out Experimental Design Notes
  2. In pairs, conduct an experiment for which the responding variable is reaction time.  Compare two groups of at least 5 students.  These could be the same people in two different conditions or they could be different people.  On your paper, write down your experimental question and your hypothesis.  Identify your manipulated variable, your responding variable, and at least three important controlled variables.  Create a chart for your results, including averages for each testing group.  Then use an online statistical test to determine the p-value for your data.  Use that p-value, as well as some averaged data, to make and state your conclusion.  All parts of this investigation should be documented on this lab report scaffold.
  3. Click the following link to use an Online Statistical Test to analyze your data.  If your p ≤ 0.05, then your results are statistically significant (95% confidence).  Choose one of these tests...
    1. T-Test for dependent means (same test subjects, different conditions)
    2. T-Test for independent means (different test subjects, different conditions)
    3. Mann-Whitney U test  (different test subjects, different conditions)
  4. Make a conclusion about the significance of your results.

 Homework:  

  • First, read the experimental design notes -- except for the part about statistics.  Second, read "example 1" (Mr. Peabody's experiment) on page 3 of the notes.  Find and categorize as many experimental design mistakes as you can.  You can circle and label them in the paragraph, or you can make a list at the bottom of the page.

Class 59 Friday, 4/6/2018

Warm-Up:  

Someone offers you a wager that is decided by a coin toss.  The terms of the bet are, she calls the toss while the coin is still in the air.  If she calls correctly, you pay her a dollar.  If she is incorrect, she pays you a dollar.

Before the toss that counts, she gives you the coin so that you can examine it and satisfy yourself that it is a "fair coin."  You do this by tossing the coin a number of times and counting heads and tails.

1.  In scientific inquiry, what does it mean for something to be "statistically significant?"

2.  What is the minimum number of tosses that would allow you to "show, scientifically" that the coin is unfair?

3.  What, exactly, would the results of these tosses tell you?

Today:   

  • Return projects and discuss grading
  • Finish National Geographic Cyclone.  Answer questions.
  • Next class -- begin scientific inquiry

Homework

  • None

Class 58 Wednesday, 4/4/2018

Warm-Up:  

What causes hurricanes?

Today:   

 

Homework

  • None

Class 57 Monday, 4/2/2018

Warm-Up:  

No warm-up today.

Today:   

Homework

  • None

Class 56 Thursday, 3/29/2018

Warm-Up:  

The picture on the right shows the bottom of a hovercraft.  How does it hover?

Today:   

Thursday:

  • Hovercraft Coriolis demo in classroom

  • Work time

Links:  Resource page for this unit (Climate Mapping) -- project information, notes, videos, etc.

Homework

Class 55 Tuesday, 3/26/2018

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/6b/Jetstreamconfig.jpgWarm-Up:  

1. Compare the jet streams on the right to the prevailing winds (far right).  What do you notice?

2.  What are jet streams?  How do they relate to the "polar vortex?"

3.  How do jet streams affect our weather?

4.  What causes jet streams?

 Link to Jet stream Animation

Today:   

Thursday:

  • Hovercraft Coriolis demo in classroom

  • Work time

Links:  Resource page for this unit (Climate Mapping) -- project information, notes, videos, etc.

Homework

Class 54 Thursday, 3/21/2018

Warm-Up:   
We will use the contraption on the right to simulate ocean currents.  How do you think it works?

Today:   

  • Check/discuss homework (Map #3)
  • Discuss what's on the quiz next class -- #26-33 from Climate Pattern Questions -- With Answers
  • A5/6 -- Complete North America map
  • Simulate current with your laser cut continent
    • If you haven't submitted your files, follow this link to the directions --  Click here for directions. 
    • If you do not successfully submit a Rhino file before next class, you can print your continent during class, paste it onto cardboard, and cut the outline using a scroll saw.
  • Get Continent Mini-Project Guidelines.

Tuesday:

  • Quiz -- take quiz, get it graded, and discuss it

  • Work time

Thursday:

  • Hovercraft Coriolis demo in classroom

  • Work time

Links:  Resource page for this unit (Climate Mapping) -- project information, notes, videos, etc.

Homework

Class 53 Tuesday, 3/20/2018

Warm-Up:    A relative humidity of 100% means the air cannot evaporate any more water; it is 100% full of water vapor.

1) Which air can evaporate more water vapor, 90 degree air or 60 degree air?  Why?
2) Which air contains more water when its relative humidity is 100%, 90 degree air or 60 degree air?
3) Suppose you have some air with a relative humidity of 70%.  If you cool down the air, what will happen to its relative humidity?
4) What is the dewpoint?
5) When does dew form?  Why?

Today:   

Homework

Class 53 Friday, 3/16/2018

Warm-Up:   
I have an empty fuel can, like the one on the right.  My plan is to open the unscrew the cap, heat up the can on a hot plate, screw the cap back on the can, and remove the can from the hot plate.

1.  What is going to happen?
2.  Which is potentially more explosive, a fuel can that is full or a fuel can that is almost empty?  Why?
3.  If you were going to do this demo in front of a class, what would be a good precaution to take?
4.  Estimate the gas pressure inside the can before heating, during heating, and the cap has been returned.

Today:   

  • Quiz
  • A5/6 -- Did we finish #2 of   Climate Map Practice?
  • Design your own continent -- you will be creating a laser cut physical model, simulating your continent's ocean currents, and explaining all of its climate features.  Click the following link and follow the directions describing how to create and submit your continent. Click here for directions.  This must be done from a school computer that has Rhino software.  Most science classroom computers and library computers have Rhino.
  • North America Map
  • Resource page for this unit (Climate Mapping) -- notes, videos, etc.

Homework

Class 52 Monday, 3/12/2018

Warm-Up:   

There are three misteaks in thi sentence.  Can you find them?

Today:   

Homework

Class 51 Thursday, 3/8/2018

Today:   

Homework

Class 51 Tuesday, 3/6/2018

Warm-Up:   

The Monsoon Effect is caused by the difference between the rates of heating and cooling of land and oceans.  The property of matter that determines the rate of heating or cooling is specific heat

1.  Does water change temperature faster or more slowly than land?

Both pictures on the upper right show the same land and ocean.  The perspectives are different.

2.  Is there an onshore (toward shore) or offshore (away from shore) breeze?

3.  Is there higher pressure over the continent or over the ocean?

4.  Is this late summer or late winter?

5.  Will this effect increase or decrease the precipitation on the land?

6.  Where in the world is there a very strong Monsoon Effect?

 

Today:   

Homework

  • Study.  Quiz next class over questions 1-11 from Climate Pattern Questions. Know and understand the answers to the questions.
  • Other upcoming quizzes over Climate Pattern Questions:  Monday (3/12) -- questions 14-25;  Wednesday (3/14) -- questions 26-31

 

Class 50 Friday, 2/23/2018

Warm-Up:   

The wind is blowing from left to right in the diagram on the right.

1.  Why are there clouds on the left side of the mountain?
2.  What do you think the wet and dry adiabatic rates are?
3.  Why is the starting temperature cooler than the final temperature?

Today:   

Homework

  • None

Class 49 Wednesday, 2/21/2018

Warm-Up:   

Why does salt melt ice?

Today:   

Homework

  • None

Class 48 Monday, 2/19/2018

Warm-Up:   

1.  What months might the diagram on the right represent?

2.  How would the Earth look different in June?

3.  How would it look different in December?

Today:   

Homework

  • Quiz next class.  On a blank sheet of paper, be able to draw...
    • Arrows showing all of the major circulation patterns in Earth's atmosphere.
    • Pressure Belts
    • Areas of high and low precipitation
    • Prevailing winds
Class 47 Thursday, 2/15/2018

Warm-Up: 
  

What will happen in the picture on the right?

Today:   

Homework

  • None
Class 46 Tuesday, 2/13/2018

Warm-Up: 
  

1.  Why does the bird keep drinking?

2.  How should one prepare for a test?

Today:   

Homework

 

Class 45 Monday, 2/5/2018

Warm-Up: 
  

One way to classify rocks is by their method of formation.  This gives three types: igneous, metamorphic, or sedimentary?

1.  Which rock types are clearly shown in the diagram on the right?

2.  Which of the three rock types can be used for radiometric dating?

3.  What causes the radioactive clock to reset?  In other words, what can cause the radiometric age of a rock to go back to zero?

4.  Some rock is made from volcanic ash.  Would that rock be igneous, sedimentary, or both?  Could it be radiometrically dated?

Today:   

Homework:  Prepare for test next Tuesday (2/13).  Study Rock Dating Terminology.  Memorize the definitions and answers.  Try the practice tests, below.

 

Class 44 Tuesday, 1/30/2018

Warm-Up: 
   Logarithms...

1.  Log28 = 3.  Log216 = 4.  Log416 = 2.  Log5125 = ?

2.  x0 = 1.  x1 =0.5   x2 = 0.25.   x3 = 0.125.  x4 =0.0625.  x = ?

3.  Logx0.0625 = ?

If your calculator is limited, you can use... Logyz = Log10z / Log10

Today:   

  • Check/Review homework
  • Rock Dating -- test version 2.  Solutions.  Introduce logarithm method.

Homework:  Optional but strongly recommended -- complete test version 3

Class 43 Friday, 1/26/2018

Warm-Up: 

A pond is 100 feet wide.  Starting from one side of the pond, a snail glides directly across, covering half of the remaining distance each day. 
1.  How many days does it take the snail to reach a point three feet from the opposite side of the pond?
2.  How many days does it take for the snail to reach the opposite side?

Today:   

  • Course recommendations -- discuss in A5/6
  • Rock Dating

Homework:  Complete Rock Dating Review at the end of the  Rock Dating Handout  video showing solutions

Class 42 Wednesday, 1/24/2018

Warm-Up: 
from 3/8/99...

Today:   

  • Look at midterms.  Verify grades.  Return your midterm -- you may not keep it.
  • Return various papers
  • Course recommendations -- If you want me to recommend you, write your name and the course to which you would like to be recommended.
  • New Unit -- Rock Dating -- Rock Dating Handout
  • No more test corrections -- but I will try to provide more practice tests

Homework: 

Image result for rock cycleClass 41 Wednesday, 1/10/2018

Warm-Up: 

The diagram on the right illustrates the "Rock Cycle."  In the rock cycle, there are three types of rocks: igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic.  Based on this diagram...

1.  How is an igneous rock made?

2.  How is a sedimentary rock made?

3.  How is a metamorphic rock made?


Today:   

  • Midterm Updates:
    • The answer to #15 on the Astronomy section of the midterm review is wrong.  The answer should be "e," not "b."
    • Be aware that some of the multiple choice questions on the midterm review may be changed to short answer questions on the actual test.  Likewise, some short answer may be converted to multiple choice.
  • Use this Google Form (or the link in your email) to submit your project.
  • Midterm: 
    • No points will be given for completing the Midterm Review  Answers to Midterm Review.
    • The midterm will be similar to the unit tests in content and composition.
    • If you do not have any missing assignments, I will replace the lower of your last two quizzes with your grade for the Plate Tectonics portion of the midterm.
  • Work time -- stop-motion animation project

Homework: 

Class 40 Monday, 1/8/2018

Warm-Up: 


What is the object of these photos?  Hint:  It's related to a homework assignment that over half of you have not completed.


Today:   

Homework: 

Class 39  Tuesday, 1/4/2018

Warm-Up: 


1. Why is the approaching weather system called a "Bomb Cyclone?"
2. What are some effects of rapidly dropping pressure?

Today:   

  • Quiz
  • Get Midterm Review  Answers to Midterm Review
  • Work on stop-motion animation project
    • Example Project
    • Easiest method -- once you get pictures to your Google Drive or your school drive
    • General Requirements ** Note that my example does not meet all of these requirements.  It would not recieve 100%.
      • The author's name must be displayed prominently at the top of the scree in clearly legibile letters that are at least 1 inch tall
      • The animation of each plate boundary must begin with the featureless plate or plates
      • The name of a real-life location (where this feature exists) must appear on at least one slide
      • No words can be used other than the name of the feature
      • For each feature or boundary, there must be some indication of  where earthquakes occur. [I used red stars.]
      • All materials (sediment, etc.) must be shown with proper shading
      • Arrows must show the movement of all moving materials
      • Animation must include enough frames to clearly portray any growth, shrinkage, or movement of tectonic features.
      • Frame rate must be long enough to read the words

Homework: 

  • None
Class 38  Tuesday, 1/2/2018

Warm-Up: 


The stop motion animation video on the right was created by a student from Brown's River Middle School. 

How is stop motion animation done?

Today:   

Homework: 

Class 37  Thursday, 12/21/2017

Warm-Up: 


The Northern Hemisphere winter solstice and the Southern Hemisphere summer solstice both occurred today at 11:28AM.

1.  What is special about this solstice?

2.  What can you deduce from the diagram on the right?

Today:   

Homework: 

  • Review the plate tectonics notes.  Practice drawing the diagrams that we are drawing in class.   As you draw the diagrams, explain the reason for every feature.  For help, watch the videos above.
  • On a clear night, go out and view the stars. See previous classes' "homework," below, for details.
Class 36  Tuesday, 12/19/2017

Warm-Up: 


Mafic magma is runnier than felsic magma.  Felsic magma is stickier and gooier than mafic magma.

1.  Which type of magma is darker in color?

2.  If you were given these two types of magma, and you were told to form them into volcanoes, which type of magma would be better for forming a steep volcano?

3.  Suppose you were given a couple of volcanoes and some magma, and you were told to use the magma to plug up the volcanoes.  Which magma would work best?

4.  Suppose that, eventually, the pressure inside the volcanoes that you plugged up will cause an eruption.  If you filled some volcanoes with mafic magma and some with felsic magma, which volcanoes will erupt more explosively?

Today:   

  • Return corrected tests, quizzes, and other assignments
  • Fill out this form to tell me if you would prefer to drop your lowest quiz or replace it with your test score.
  • Plate Tectonics -- continue plate boundary diagrams

Homework: 

  • Practice drawing the diagrams that we are drawing in class.   As you draw the diagrams, explain the reason for every feature. 
  • Some time before the end of thise quarter, go outside at night and observe all of the following:  1)  Orion  2) Betelgeuse (a red giant), Bellatrix (the "female warrior"), Sirius (the "dog star" -- and the brightest star), and Polaris (the North Star).  Have an adult witness sign a statement saying that you actually observed these stars.  Turn in the statement with your name on it.
Class 35  Friday, 12/14/2017

Warm-Up: 
  1. One of the rocks on the right is basalt.  The other is granite.  Which is which?

  2. Guess which rock is more dense.

  3. What is the difference between a meteor, a meteoroid, a meteorite, and and asteroid?

  4. The Geminid meteor shower peaked yesterday morning.  Why is it best to view meteors between midnight and 4AM?

  5. Did anyone see a meteor last night?

Today:   

  • Using Casseopia to find Polaris
  • Answer to practice quiz bonus
  • Quiz
  • Fill out this form to tell me if you would prefer to drop your lowest quiz or replace it with your test score.
  • Convection currents in a bowl
  • Turn in bonus question from the practice quiz -- if you did it.
  • Plate Tectonics

Homework: 

  • Some time before the end of thise quarter, go outside at night and observe all of the following:  1)  Orion  2) Betelgeuse (a red giant), Bellatrix (the "female warrior"), Sirius (the "dog star" -- and the brightest star), and Polaris (the North Star).  Have an adult witness sign a statement saying that you actually observed these stars.  Turn in the statement with your name on it.
Class 34  Wednesday, 12/13/2017

Warm-Up: 


1.  How many time zones are there on the Earth?
2.  Where is the International Date Line? 
3.  What happens at the International Date Line?  What is its purpose?

Today:   

  • Test corrections
  • Fill out this form to tell me if you would prefer to drop your lowest quiz or replace it with your test score.
  • Turn in bonus question from the practice quiz -- if you did it.
  • More quiz review -- how to quiz yourself on the moon questions.
    • Know and understand the answers to Practice quiz -- system of Earth, Moon, and Sun Video Solutions
    • Quiz yourself on the information in #1-7 of this handout.  Be able to correctly label all of the times in different locations on the Earth.  Be able to do this from either a "top" perspective (looking down from Polaris toward the North Pole -- North Pole in the center of the circle representing Earth), or from a "side" perspective (North pole pointing toward the top of your paper; South Pole pointing toward the bottom).  Be able to do this with the sun on either the left or right side of the diagram.
    • Quiz yourself on the information in #21 of this Handout:  System of the Earth, Moon, and Sun Answer Key.  If you are given one bit of information about a mon from that page, you should be able to provide the rest of the information about that moon.  For example, if you are given the name of the moon phase, you should be able to provide all of the following:  appearance, position in a diagram showing the moon's orbit, time of moonrise/moonset, time of high or low tide, tide strength, and an assessment of the possibility of an eclipse.
  • Begin Plate Tectonics

Homework: 

  • Prepare for quiz next class.
  • Some time before the end of thise quarter, go outside at night and observe all of the following:  1)  Orion  2) Betelgeuse (a red giant), Bellatrix (the "female warrior"), Sirius (the "dog star" -- and the brightest star), and Polaris (the North Star).  Have an adult witness sign a statement saying that you actually observed these stars.  Turn in the statement with your name on it.
Class 33  Monday, 12/11/2017

Warm-Up: 


1. The moon rotates.  In which direction does it rotate?  How long does one rotation take?  How can this be proven?

2.  What do you think the small tide diagram is supposed to show?

3.  The bottom diagram shows the Earth, as seen from the moon.  What was the moon phase at the time that the photograph was taken? [There are two possibilities]


Today:   

Homework: 

  • Test correction day will be on Wednesday.   If you are not making corrections, bring something to do silently at that time.
  • Some time before the end of thise quarter, go outside at night and observe all of the following:  1)  Orion  2) Betelgeuse (a red giant), Bellatrix (the "female warrior"), Sirius (the "dog star" -- and the brightest star), and Polaris (the North Star).  Have an adult witness sign a statement saying that you actually observed these stars.  Turn in the statement with your name on it.

 

Class 32  Thursday, 12/7/2017

Warm-Up: 


1.  If you want to see the Big Dipper, where should you look?
2.  In the picture on the right, where is the North Star?
3.  Why can't we see the constellation Orion during the summer?
4.  What's your astrological sign?  When is it visible, according to the diagram on the bottom right?

Today: 

Homework: 

  • A5/6 -- Finish the last page of the notes.
  • Some time before the end of thise quarter, go outside at night and observe all of the following:  1)  Orion  2) Betelgeuse (a red giant), Bellatrix (the "female warrior"), Sirius (the "dog star" -- and the brightest star), and Polaris (the North Star).  Have an adult witness sign a statement saying that you actually observed these stars.  Turn in the statement with your name on it.

Class 31  Tuesday, 12/5/2017

Warm-Up: 

The Sun, Earth, and Moon are continually spaghettifying one another.  We see the effects of this spaghettification in the form of tides.

1.  What causes spaghettification?

2.  Which object exerts greater gravitational force on us, the Moon or the Sun?

3.  Do we see different sides of the moon, or do we always see the same side?

4.  Is the Earth's 24 hour rotational period speeding up or slowing down over time?  Explain. Answer

Today: 

Homework:  none

 

Class 30  Friday, 12/1/2017

Warm-Up: 

In the picture on the right, the opaque sphere blocks sunlight, causing a shadow to be cast on the number line.

 

1.  Which positions on the number line are experiencing a partial eclipse?

2.  Which positions are experiencing a total eclipse?

3.  What is today's moon phase?

Today: 

 

Homework: 

  • Study for the test next class.  See class 30, below, for a description of the test format.  Study the extended response questions and your old astronomy quizzes.   For each quiz question, know why the answer is what it is.  This is especially important for multiple choice questions.  They may be altered so that the underlying concept is the same, but the answer is different.  Understand the underlying concept(s).
Class 29  Wednesday, 11/29/2017

Warm-Up: 

1. Whose flag is this?  From an ESS perspective, what is wrong with it?

2.  If you could jump through a hole in the Earth, where would you come out? (antipodes map)  What time would it be in that location?

Today: 

Homework: 

  • Study for the test (next Tuesday).  See the description of the test format, above.  Study the extended response questions and your old astronomy quizzes.   For each quiz question, know why the answer is what it is.  This is especially important for multiple choice questions.  They may be altered so that the underlying concept is the same, but the answer is different.  Understand the underlying concept(s).
Class 28  Monday, 11/27/2017

Warm-Up: 

Why do clocks go clockwise?

Today: 

Homework: 

  • Complete:  Extended response questions
  • Study your old astronomy quizzes.   For each quiz question, know why the answer is what it is.  Understand the context.
Class 27  Thursday, 11/15/2017

Warm-Up: 

  1. What are the lines in the sky?
  2. How was the picture created?
  3. Why are the lines arranged in a circular pattern?
  4. Where was this picture taken?  Or, at least, where was it not taken?
  5. If this picture was taken in the Northern Hemisphere, in which direction did the circles form? (clockwise or counter-clockwise) 
  6. Which stars are moving faster, the inner ones or the outer ones?
  7. If there is a star near the center, what is its name?
  8. Why did the photographer have to stop the picture before the stars made a complete circle?

Today: 

  • Quiz
  • Log on to a computer and open Rhino 5 (64 bit) -- NOT safe mode
  • Design Laser-Cut Holiday Gifts -- or Continents for a later project (Continent Project Map Template)

Homework:  None

Class 26  Tuesday, 11/13/2017

Warm-Up: 

These spectra on the right were produced by three different stars.  One star was stationary, and the other two were moving.

1.  Which star was moving away?

2.  Which star was moving closer?

3.  Are these emission spectra or absorption spectra?

4.  How many axes of symmetry does a snowflake have?  Why does it have this symmetry?

Today: 

Homework:  Study for quiz next class over Notes:  Stars and The Universe, Part 2 Answer Key

Class 25 Friday, 11/10/2017

Warm-Up: 

If you're standing next to a race track, what do you hear as the cars pass you?

a.  Their pitch changes from high to low.

b.  Their pitch changes from low to high.

c.  There is no change in pitch; only volume changes.

Today: 

Homework:  Study for quiz next class over Notes:  Stars and The Universe, Part 1 Answer Key

Class 24 Wednesday, 11/8/2017

Warm-Up: 

1.  What will happen if I hold a tennis ball on top of a basketball and drop them to the floor together?

2.  What if I reverse their positions?

3.  Why does this happen?

 

Today: 

Homework:  Finish the Practice Quiz

Class 23  Monday, 11/6/2017

Warm-Up: 

What would happen if you were floating in outer space with no suit or spacecraft? Describe the effects of...

 

3. Radiation definition dangers   cosmic rays (cr wikipedia)  what are cosmic rays? apollo astronauts article sound

4. Solar wind  wikipedia solar storms

ndt

Today: 

Homework:  Review the notes.  No quiz next class.

Class 22  Thursday, 11/2/2017

Warm-Up: 

What would happen if you were floating in outer space with no suit or spacecraft? Describe the effects of...

1. Air pressure (or lack thereof)

2. Temperature how cold is space?

 

Tomorrow we can consider...

3. Radiation  cosmic rays  what are cosmic rays? apollo astronauts article

4. Solar wind  solar storms

ndt

Today: 

Homework: 

  • None
Class 21  Tuesday, 10/31/2017

Today: 

Homework: 

Image result for scale diagram terrestrial and jovian planetsClass 20  Friday, 10/27/2017

Warm-Up: 

Why are the outer planets much larger than the inner planets?

Today: 

Image result for solar system frost lineHomework: 

Class 19  Wednesday, 10/25/2017

Warm-Up: 

In our Sun, hydrogen atoms are fused (squeezed together) to create helium atoms.

 

1.  What appears to be wrong with the nuclear fusion equation on the top right?

 

2.  What is actually missing from the equation?

 

3.  E = mc2 is a famous equation.  What do each of the letters in the equation represent?

Today: 

Homework: 

  • Short quiz next class over "Birth of the Earth video" questions.  Here are the questions and the answers. - Video Answers
Class 18  Monday, 10/23/2017

Warm-Up: 


None

Today: 

Homework: 

  • Soon you will have a quiz over the formation of the Earth and today's video questions.  Study the video questions.
  • If you plan to do test corrections next class, study for that, too.

 

Class 17  Tuesday, 10/17/2017

Warm-Up: 


Where are we in the Universe? 

If you were going to write a letter to someone in the most distant reaches of the universe, how would you write your return address?

scale of universe

laniakea supercluster

planck length

graphic

Today: 

Homework: 

  • Research the topics you missed on the test.  Study and be ready to try to fix your mistakes on next Wednesday.
Class 16  Friday, 10/13/2017

Warm-Up: 


Examine the mercury barometer on the right. 
 
1.  Do you understand how it works? 

2.  If you were given some mercury, a long test tube, and a bowl, could you make one? [Unfortunately, Hg is toxic, so if you find a bunch, please don't actually try this.]

3.  Why is the vacuum at the top important?  What is a vacuum?

4. 
If this barometer were made using water instead of mercury, would the tube need to be longer or shorter?

5.  How could this picture be useful during your test?
 

Today: 

Homework: 

  • Submit your project before Monday
Class 15  Tuesday, 10/10/2017

Warm-Up: 


1.  How does one siphon a fluid?
2.  How/why does siphoning work?
3.  Would siphoning work on the moon?  Why or why not?
4.  How does a toilet work?  Would a toilet work on the moon?  Why or why not?

Today: 

Homework: 

  • Test on Friday.  Study.
Class 14  Friday, 10/6/2017

Warm-Up: 


The picture on the right shows the pipes leading into the urinal in the men's restroom across from the gym.  The picture was taken during our last hot spell.  As you can see in the picture, there was condensation on these pipes.

1.  Why was there condensation?
2.  How recently had the urinal been flushed?
3.  Why does this happen most often during the spring?
4.  Why did it happen (unusually) during our last hot spell?

Today: 

Upcoming Deadlines:  

  • Today (10/3) -- Project work time.  Get practice test.
  • Tuesday (10/10) -- Practice test is due. Turn in projects.
  • Friday (10/13)-- Test over everything so far.  If you have no zeroes in Powerschool at that time, you may drop your lowest quiz grade.

Homework: 

Class 13  Wednesday, 10/4/2017

Warm-Up: 


Note the new rows (circled in red) that have been added to the project data sheet. 
1.  Does the addition of these new rows make the calculation process harder or easier?
2.  How do you find each of the bits of data on the right?

Today: 

Homework/Upcoming Deadlines:  

  • Today (10/3) -- Project work time. 
  • Friday (10/6) -- Project work time.  Practice Test will be handed out. 
  • Tuesday (10/10) -- Practice test and Projects are due.  Review and begin new unit -- waves and astronomy.
  • Friday (10/13)-- Test over everything so far.  If you have no zeroes in Powerschool at that time, you may drop your lowest quiz grade.
Class 12  Monday, 10/2/2017

Warm-Up: 


The picture on the right shows a typical syringe.  We will be using a slightly different syringe to measure balloon volume. 
1.  Describe the steps you should take if the volume of the balloon is bigger than the volume of the syringe.
2.  Explain why.
3.  What does the Snipping Tool do, and what is the easiest way to use it?

Today: 

Homework/Upcoming Deadlines:  

  • Today and Wednesday (10/4) -- Project work time. 
  • Friday (10/6) -- Practice Test will be handed out.  If necessary, finish your project.
  • Tuesday (10/10) -- Practice test and Projects are due.  Review and begin new unit -- waves and astronomy.
  • Friday (10/13)-- Test over everything so far.  If you have no zeroes in Powerschool at that time, you may drop your lowest quiz grade.
Class 11  Thursday, 9/28/2017

Warm-Up: 
Last night, a cold front moved through our area.  The map on the right shows where the cold front was situated this morning.

1.  What happens when cold air pushes into warmer air?  Which body of air rises?
2.  What happens to the pressure and volume of the rising air?
3.  How does the change in pressure and volume affect the temperature of the air?
4.  If there is water in the air, will this temperature change cause water in the air to evaporate or condense?
5.  Does this cause clouds to form or to disappear?

Today: 

Homework:  

Class 10  Tuesday, 9/26/2017

Warm-Up: 

The hot air balloon on the right is tugging against a string that is attached to a 100g weight.  The weight is sitting on a balance, and the balance reads 90g.

1.  Is the balloon neutrally buoyant?

2.  Why doesn't the balance read 100g?

3.  If the string were untied from the 100g weight, the balloon would fly away.  How much mass would need to be added to the balloon to make it neutrally buoyant?

Today: 

  • A7/8 -- Check in with people who did quiz corrections.
  • Check/discuss homework that was due last class. Hot air balloon practice solutions
  • Continue work in the computer lab.  I think we were around step 2d or 2e, below.
  • Design a hot air balloon and predict whether it will float or sink.
    1. Make a copy of this spreadsheet
    2. Design, resize, and measure your hot air balloon using Rhino -- following Mr. Stapleton's directions.
      1. Draw your plastic sheet (175cm x 250cm)
      2. Create your balloon
      3. Unroll your balloon.  If, for some reason, you do not have a usable 3-D design, you can download the one at this link and then begin at step 2d.
      4. Arrange your balloon parts into a net.
      5. Scale your balloon and net to be as large as possible while still fitting on the plastic sheet.
      6. Measure your balloon's surface area and volume.
      7. Use the spreadsheet to find out if your balloon will sink of float.
    3. Print your balloon design. 
    4. Return to the classroom and construct a paper scale model of your balloon.
  • Show me your grades in PowerSchool, if you haven't already.

Homework:  

  • None
Class 9  Friday, 9/22/2017

Warm-Up: 

The diagram on the right shows a rock that is tied to a small, white, air-filled balloon.  Explain why the whole thing sinks near the bottom but floats near the surface.

Today: 

  • Return quizzes.
  • Go to the library computer lab.  Log in. 
  • Check/discuss homework. Hot air balloon practice solutions
  • Show me your grades in PowerSchool, if you haven't already.
  • Air density calculator
  • Design a hot air balloon and predict whether it will float or sink.
    • Make a copy of this spreadsheet
    • Design, resize, and measure your hot air balloon using Rhino -- following Mr. Stapleton's directions.
      • Draw your plastic sheet (175cm x 250cm)
      • Create your balloon
      • Unroll your balloon
      • Arrange your balloon parts into a net.
      • Scale your balloon and net to be as large as possible while still fitting on the plastic sheet.
      • Measure your balloon's surface area and volume.
      • Use the spreadsheet to find out if your balloon will sink of float.
    • Print your balloon design.  Later on, use this to make a paper scale model of your balloon.

Homework:  

  • None
Image result for density of atmosphereClass 8  Wednesday, 9/20/2017

Warm-Up: 

1.  On Monday during A5/6, I may have said that the rising blobs in a lava lamp do not have greater buoyancy than the sinking blobs.  If I did, was I correct?

2.  What factors do you think determine the density of air at sea level?  On what type of day should the air at sea level be most dense?

3.  Determine the current density of the air in this room using this calculator and today's weather conditions.

Today: 

Homework:  

Class 7  Monday, 9/18/2017

Warm-Up: 

 1.  Why do the blobs in a lava lamp rise and sink?

2.  Why do they connect together at the bottom, but not at the top?

3.  What is the formula for calculating density?  Do you remember the mnemonic?  Do you know what a mnemonic is?

Today: 

  • Check and review homework. Quiz Review Answer Key
  • Show me your grades in PowerSchool, if you haven't already.
  • Make a lowest density box out of copy paper (hollow rectangular prism).  What characteristics give a box low density?  Why?
  • Rhino (CAD) intro
  • Future Activity -- Modeling thermal expansion and convection
  • Air density calculator

Homework:  

  • Quiz on Wednesday. No corrections for future quizzes.
  • Quiz correction (for previous quiz) on Wednesday.
Class 6  Thursday, 9/14/2017

Warm-Up: 

  1. How does a 4 stroke engine work?  Why is it called a 4 stroke?

2.  How is a diesel engine different?

3.  How does a 2 stroke engine work?  What are the advantages and disadvantages of 4 strokes vs 2 strokes?

Today: 

Homework:  

  • Finish the quiz review.
Class 5  Tuesday, 9/12/2017

Warm-Up: 

  1.  Sometimes you can "see your breath."  Why can't you see it right now?  I know of a way to make my breath visible right now.  Can you guess how I can do it?

2.  Once you've seen the trick, can you explain how it works?

3. *What is in air? 

Today: 

  • Warm-up
  • Return quizzes.  Look over your quiz and then return it.  If you want to do corrections, take notes on the questions that you missed. 
  • Grades are in PowerSchool.  Check your grade.
  • Quiz/Test Correction Procedure:
    • Outside of class, figure out why you missed the question, and prepare to explain the correct answer. 
    • Schedule a time to meet with Mr. Stapleton by next Wednesday (Flex on Tuesday, Wednesday, or Thursday -- not Friday -- or some day before school.). 
    • Meet with Mr. Stapleton and correct your wrong answers using a pen.  You may attach extra paper if necessary.  For multiple choice questions, explain why your new choice is correct.
  • A 5/6 -- Finish Notes:  Why Dense Things Sink -- Pressure and Buoyancy  Answer Key
  • Notes:  Pressure and Temperature, Temperature, Pressure, and Composition of The Universe

Homework:  

  • Quiz corrections must be completed by next Wednesday
Image result for tornadoClass 4   Friday, 9/8/2017

Warm-Up: 

1.  An object floating in a glass of water tends to move to the side of the glass and stay there.  Why?  Can you think of a way to make the object stay in the middle without touching it?

2.  Hurricanes Image result for hurricane irma satellite viewand tornadoes are both cyclones.  In the center of a cyclone, is there low air pressure or high air pressure?  How can you tell?

3.  What caused the earthquake in Mexico this morning?

Today: 

Homework:  

  • None
File:Bathyscaphe Trieste.jpgClass 3   Wednesday, 9/6/2017

Warm-Up: 

Until recently, the Bathyscaphe Trieste (shown on the right) was the only manned vessel to have reached the deepest part of the ocean.  Except for the spherical "pressure chamber" on the bottom of the Trieste, most of the vessel was filled with gasoline.  The pointy "hoppers" on the bottom were filled with bits of iron that could be released by the pilots.  The vessel had no motor.  In 2012, James Cameron (moviemaker etc.) dove even deeper in a much smaller submarine, the Deepsea Challenger.

  1. Where is the deepest part of the ocean?
  2. How deep is it?
  3. Geologically speaking, why is that part of the ocean so deep?
  4. What are the dangers of traveling that deep?
  5. Why did the Trieste sink, and once it got to the bottom, what made it float back up?
  6. Why was the main portion of the Trieste filled with gasoline.

Today: 

Handouts:

Homework:  

Class 2   Friday, 9/1/2017
Warm-Up: 
Suppose there is a freshwater iceberg floating in a freshwater lake.  If no water is lost to evaporation, seepage, etc., what will happen to the surface level of the lake when the iceberg melts?  Will it rise, sink, or stay the same.  Why?

Today: 

  • Warm-up
  • Turn-in course expectations (due today)
  • Check homework (Properties of matter practice through 21) and finish it.
  • Finish making film canister submarines.  Write procedures and work on questions (one set of each per group)
  • Test the procedures 

Handouts:

Homework:  

Class 1   Wednesday, 8/30/2017
Warm-Up: 
This bottle on the right contains a "cartesian diver."  The diver dives when the bottle is squeezed, and the diver rises when the bottle is released.

1.  As
the bottle is squeezed, what is happening to the diver's density, volume, and mass?
2.  Why are those properties changing in those ways?

Today: 

  • Warm-up
  • Turn-in course expectations (due friday)
  • Fill out student info sheets
  • Enter attendance
  • Slideshow
  • Course Expectations and class topics
  • Properties of matter practice
  • Begin making film canister submarines

Handouts:

Homework:  


Image result for north pole on globeClass 0  Tuesday 8/29/2017 (20 minute class)
Warm-Up: 

1.  Grab a copy of the course expectations.

2.  Find your seat on the seating chart

3.  Consider this question... which way is the North Pole?  Can you point to it (or pretty close)?

Today: 

Homework:  Share your course expectations handout with your parents.  Have them sign and return it by Next Friday (9/9).