Class 73:  Thursday  5/16/19

Today: 

  • Work day
  • Inventor's logs should be updated by the end of class today.
  • See other deadlines listed last class.

 

Class 72:  Thursday  5/16/19

Today: 

  • Work day

 

The Deadlines:

  • May 20th:  Inventor's Log Check.  Inventor's logs since the last time I checked must all be completed satisfactorily.
  • May 30th:  Presentations in class for STEM (non-dual enrollment) students and any non-STEM, non-dual enrollment students who want to get it out of the way.  In addition to the regular grading rubric, STEM projects will be assessed according to this capstone grading rubric.
  • June 5th:  Presentations for anyone who has not yet presented.
  • June 3rd:  STEM Capstone Night.  project will be judged according to the judges' poster rubric.
  • June 13th (Final exam day) Google Site inventor's notebooks (including the log) must be updated (details to come) with working, useful (and pleasant) links.
  • EHS grades for the rest of the year will include
    • Inventor's Log Checks
    • Presentation
    • Final Exam -- Inventor's Notebook

 

Class 71:  Monday  5/13/19

Today: 

  • Work day
Class 70:  Thursday  5/9/19

Today: 

Class 69:  Monday  5/6/19

Today: 

Class 68:  Thursday  5/2/19

Today: 

  • Work time
Class 67:  Tuesday  4/30/19

Today: 

  • Work time
Class 66:  4/17/19

Today: 

  • Work time.
  • If you need to take anything home over break, take it today.
Class 65:  4/15/19

Today: 

  • Work time.
  • Deadlines:
    • Dual Enrollment Presentations -- May 9th  Here are the general grading guidelines for UVM credit.
    • STEM (non-dual enrollment) students
      • Present projects in class on May 30th.  Here is the rubric that STEM advisors are supposed to use to grade your project (separate from the grading in this class) -- capstone grading rubric
      • STEM capstone night -- June 3rd.  Your project will be judged according to the judges' poster rubric.
    • Non-STEM (non-dual enrollment) students may presnet projects on May 30th or June 5th.
    • Everyone -- Final Exam (June 13th):  Fully update your Google Site inventor's notebook.  In addition to including all of your most current project information, fix the links so that your entire year's information is easy to navigate.
  • EHS grades for the rest of the year will include
    • Inventor's Log Checks
    • Presentation
    • Final Exam -- Inventor's Notebook
  • Dual enrollment grades will be based on general grading guidelines for UVM credit.
Class 64:  4/11/19

Today: 

  • UVM dual enrollment students will present their projects to the class on May 9th, because UVM grades are due around May 10th.  Here are the general grading guidelines for UVM credit.
  • STEM capstone projects must be graded by May 30th.  Here are the teacher capstone grading rubric and the judges' poster rubric.
  • Project presentations will take place on May 30th (dual enrollment students can give an updated presentation).
  • STEM capstone night is June 3rd.  A "poster" (really a tri-sided chart) is required.
  • Final exam -- put the finishing touches on your updated, all-inclusive, Google Site with easy-to-use, intuitive links.
Class 63:  4/10/19

Today: 

  • Journal grades have been entered.  8 Points possible, for dates 3/15, 3/19, 3/21, 3/26, 3/28, 4/1, 4/3, and 4/5.  The grade is based on number of entries, not quality.  If your quality was good, and you missed a recent entry or two, you can fix them and email me to remind me to check again.  Don't forget to enter "absent" if you're gone.
  • Take a lot of pictures and screen shots of your iterations, and take good notes on your design process.  In the end, if your product "fails," at least your process can succeed.  You can show that you have been busy working on the problem, using your brain and trying new strategies.
Class 62:  4/5/19

Today: 

  • Work day
  • Make sure that your journals are up to date.  I will probably check them before next class.
Class 61:  4/3/19

Today: 

  • Work day
Class 60:  4/1/19

Today: 

  • Work day
  • Mock presentations on April 19th (the day before spring break).  We will pretend that this is the end of the course and that you are presenting your project.  Instead of a poster or tri-sided chart, you can create a slide to project on the screen.
Class 59:  3/28/19

Today: 

  • Work day
  • Mock presentations on April 19th (the day before spring break).  We will pretend that this is the end of the course and that you are presenting your project.  Instead of a poster or tri-sided chart, you can create a slide to project on the screen.
Class 58:  3/26/19

Today: 

  • Meeting.  Have a bagel. Give everyone a brief overview of where you are in your project.  This should be a show and tell.  You can show pictures or a real object.  If you have a problem that's getting you stuck, explain it.  Maybe someone will have a helpful idea.
Class 57:  3/21/19

Today: 

  • Project work time.  We will have a class meeting on Tuesday.  Be prepared to give everyone a brief overview of where you are in your project.  This should be a show and tell.  You can show pictures or a real object.
Class 56:  3/19/19

This week: 

  • Weekly meeting on Thursday?  We need more motivation, momentum, and accountability.  Share your progress with the group.  Bounce ideas around?  Snacks?
Class 55:  Friday, 3/15/19

Today: 

  • Project work time
Class 54:  Wednesday, 3/13/19

Today: 

  • Project work time
Class 53:  Monday, 3/11/19

Suppose you're 3-D printing something (like a phone case) that needs to be just the right size.  Unfortunately, even if you carefully measure the dimensions that you need, and you create a CAD file with exactly those dimensions, the 3-D print probably won't fit the real-world object? 

1.  What are some sources of error in creating a 3-D print that will fit a real object?

2.  How can you arrive at the proper fit as quickly and cheaply as possible?

Today: 

  • Discuss grades for Inventor's Notebook Check. 
    • I used code font to comment in the following people's sites: Izzy, MJ, Peregrine, Molly,
    • Jeremy -- to help with my rubric, please organize into "What I've learned so far" and "next step(s)".
  • Update your journals and put a link in your inventor's notebook.  I intend to check them between now and next class.
  • At the end of this quarter we will have a preliminary presentation of your final projects.
Class 52:  Tuesday, 3/5/19

Today: 

  • Continue work on your project.
  • If you need something, get your order in today.  I will place this week's order tomorrow.
  • By next class (Thursday), you should have an entry in your Inventor's Notebook including:
    • Photograph(s) of your first prototype (or whatever you've been working on)
    • What you've learned so far (at least one paragraph)
    • Your next step (at least one paragraph)
    • Anything you need to plan ahead for
Class 51:  Friday, 2/21/19

Today: 

  • 1st Prototype deadline is Today.
  • Take a picture (or several pictures) showing what you have done.

Homework

By the 2nd class after break, you should have an entry in your Inventor's Notebook including:
  • Photograph(s) of your first prototype (or whatever you've been working on)
  • What you've learned so far (at least one paragraph)
  • Your next step (at least one paragraph)
  • Anything you need to plan ahead for
Class 50:  Wednesday, 2/20/19

Today: 

  • 1st Prototype deadline is Friday. By the next class after break, you should have an entry in your Inventor's Notebook including:
    • Photograph(s) of your first prototype (or whatever you've been working on)
    • What you've learned so far (at least one paragraph)
    • Your next step (at least one paragraph)
    • Anything you need to plan ahead for
  • Notes regarding recent grades:
    • Arduino Grading (if you want to fix it, your grade is capped at 90%):
      • Photo(s) --  Good: Arduino itself;  Better: Arduino +Serial monitor
      • What it does:  LED turns on or off depending on whether a hand is in front of the sensor.
      • How it works (simple version)
        • Proximity sensor takes a reading (which is displayed on serial monitor)
        • The code specifies a threshold for the proximity sensor reading.  A reading over this threshold results in one LED state (on or off), and a reading not over this threshold results in the other LED state (off or on)
    • Grading of Project Steps 1-5 (If you want to fix it, your grade is capped at 95%):
      • Define the problem -- Generally good
      • Narrow your initial focus -- pick a manageable aspect of your project to serve as a starting point; describe that starting point
      • Plan your test procedure*. -- how will you measure the performance of your prototype?  Ideally you should be able to quantify performance numerically (like we did with the boats and trebuchets).
      • Create a detailed sketch of your first prototype. -- generally good, although some lacked detail, were too small, or were rotated
      • Disclose similarities to prior art.  --  You should intentionally say someting like "here are some example of the prior art" Best:  Picture + description + link; Middle:  picture + description;  Okay:  Link
    • Journal:  Did you have one, and did it cover the dates 2/4, 2/6, and 2/8?

 

Homework:  Think about your project when you're fetching firewood wood, in the shower, can't get wifi, etc.

Class 49:  Monday, 2/18/19

Today: 

  • Project work time.
  • Isaak's power relay has arrived
  • I'm almost done grading steps 1-5.
  • 1st Prototype deadline is Friday.

 

Homework:  Think about your project when you're fetching firewood wood, in the shower, can't get wifi, etc.

Class 48:  Thursday, 2/14/19

Today: 

  • Project work time.
  • I have the Lowes stuff.
  • We've been asked to place orders less frequently, so if you expect to need an order placed in the next week, get that to me today.
  • Due to the snow day, I haven't checked inventor's notebooks.

 

Homework:  Think about your project when you're fetching firewood wood, in the shower, can't get wifi, etc.

Class 47:  Tuesday, 2/12/19

Today: 

  • Project work time.
  • More orders? The plastic has been ordered.  Hopefully I will go to Lowes to get the flashing before next class.
  • Steps 1-5 of 2nd Semester Project must be represented in your published inventor's notebook by midnight tonight.  *Let me know if you think any of these requirements don't really fit with your current project work.
    1. Define the problem
    2. Narrow your initial focus.
    3. Plan your test procedure*.
    4. Create a detailed sketch of your first prototype.
    5. Disclose similarities to prior art. 

Homework:  See 1-5 above.  Finish it by tonight.

Class 46:  Friday, 2/8/19

Today: 

  • Project work time.
  • More orders?  The power relay and GPS module have been ordered.
  • Long-term Project journal check today.  You should have entries from 2/4, 2/6, and today (maybe).
  • Steps 1-5 of 2nd Semester Project must be represented in your published inventor's notebook by next Tuesday.  *Let me know if you think any of these requirements don't really fit with your current project work.
    1. Define the problem
    2. Narrow your initial focus.
    3. Plan your test procedure*.
    4. Create a detailed sketch of your first prototype.
    5. Disclose similarities to prior art. 

Homework:  Get your inventor's notebook ready by the end of the day, next Tuesday (see details above).

 

Class 45:  Wednesday, 2/6/19

Today: 

  • Project work time.
  • If you are going to need materials, let Mr. Stapleton know in advance.  It takes time to order and receive theim.
Class 44:  Monday, 2/4/19

How is the design cycle like the scientific method?  How is it different?


Today: 

  • Create a linked page (the way you linked your boat project, trebuchet project, etc) in your inventor's notebook for the arduino project.  On that page, show 1) a photo of your project, 2) a description of what it does and how it works.
  • Begin working on 2nd Semester Project.  1st Prototype dues on February 22nd. Read the details in this document.

 

Class 43:  Thursday, 1/31/19

No class today.  If you are not going on the field trip, report to Mrs. Smith's classroom (C220)

Today: 

Class 42:  Tuesday, 1/29/19

1.  Experiment with this resistor code calculator.

2.  In circuit shown on the right, does the presence of the resistor change the current flowing through the LED, the voltage drop across the LED, or both?
3.  What do the symbols on the proximity sensor mean?

Today: 

  1. Create a list of who will be staying behind on Thursday.
  2. I have one signed field trip permission slip.  Are the rest of you going?
  3. Start the Arduino Project -- get a little experience using Arduino.
    • Complete this reading in the Arduino Project BookC
      • Page 11
      • P. 18 -- How to run the Blink program before you beginn
      • 21-25
    • Make a proximity sensor or come up with your own project that senses input and then responds changes in that input with varying output.  In addition to the "output," your project must display sensor data on the serial monitor.
      • Expect difficulties.  Try to solve problems yourself.  Google your problems.  Ask others for help when it's appropriate (easy solutions that an experienced person would know, or when you're truly stumped and can't find an answer), but try to figure things out yourself whenever possible.
      • Build the   Sparkfun example using proximity sensor..
      • Modify to have output with LED.  LED should either turn on or off when your hand is held in front of the sensor  
        • Updated photo, with correct resistors   
        • Feel free to copy Mr. Stapleton's Code.  You can type it into the Arduino Environment
  4. When you have a working setup (with a working LED, proximity sensor, and serial monitor), show Mr. Stapleton so that he can verify that it works.
  5. Long-Term Project:
    • Create a detailed sketch of a first prototype.
    • List materials that you will need in order to create a first prototype.  Tell Mr. Stapleton if you need something special that must be ordered.  Keep in mind that we do not have an unlimited budget.
    • First prototype due on Februrary 22nd. 
      • Counting today and February 22nd, you have 12 class days (but you also have to create a working arduino proximity sensor system).
      • This must be a physical example of some aspect of your solution.
    • For each class day, beginning next Monday (2/4), you must document your progress in a brief journal (for each date, include a bulleted list of what you have accomplished)
Class 41:  Friday, 1/24/19

Suppose you're having trouble with your arduino project.  What should you do?  When should you ask for help?

Today: 

  1. Hopefully the Arduino board driver has been loaded on your computer.  It turns out that this is not something you could have done without adminstrator rights.
  2. Field trip permission slips?
  3. If you haven't signed up for dual enrollment, you have to have your registration complete by 1/29.
  4. Start the Arduino Project -- get a little experience using Arduino.
    • Reading in the Arduino Project Book
      • Page 11
      • P. 18 -- How to run the Blink program before you beginn
      • 21-25
    • Make a proximity sensor or come up with your own project that senses input and then responds changes in that input with varying output.  In addition to the "output," your project must display sensor data on the serial monitor.
      • Expect difficulties.  Try to solve problems yourself.  Google your problems.  Ask others for help when it's appropriate (easy solutions that an experienced person would know, or when you're truly stumped and can't find an answer), but try to figure things out yourself whenever possible.
      • Build the   Sparkfun example using proximity sensor..
      • Modify to have output with LED.  LED should either turn on or off when your hand is held in front of the sensor  
        • Photo  
        • Feel free to copy Mr. Stapleton's Code.  You can type it into the Arduino Environment
  5. Long-Term Project:
    • Create a detailed sketch of a first prototype.
    • List materials that you will need in order to create a first prototype.  Tell Mr. Stapleton if you need something special that must be ordered.  Keep in mind that we do not have an unlimited budget.
    • First prototype due on Februrary 22nd. 
      • Counting today and February 22nd, you have 12 class days (but you also have to create a working arduino proximity sensor system).
      • This must be a physical example of some aspect of your solution.
    • For each class day, beginning next Tuesday (1/29), you must document your progress in a brief journal (for each date, include a bulleted list of what you have accomplished)
Class 40:  Wednesday, 1/23/19

Why is it very important to use the right resistors when you create circuits for use with Arduino boards?

Today: 

  1. Field trip next Thursday to UVM.  Who has a signed permission slip?
  2. If you haven't signed up for dual enrollment, you have to have your registration complete by 1/29.
  3. Return presentation grading rubrics.
  4. Start the Arduino Project -- get a little experience using Arduino.
    • Reading in thee Arduino Project Bookk
      • Page 111
      • P. 18 -- How to run the Blink program before you beginn
      • 21-255
    • Make a proximity sensor or come up with your own project that senses input and then responds changes in that input with varying output.  In addition to the "output," your project must display sensor data on the serial monitor.
        • Feel free to copy Mr. Stapleton's Code.  You can type it into the Arduino Environment
  5. Long-Term Project:
    • Create a detailed sketch of a first prototype.
    • List materials that you will need in order to create a first prototype.  Tell Mr. Stapleton if you need something special that must be ordered.  Keep in mind that we do not have an unlimited budget.
    • First prototype due on Februrary 22nd. 
      • Counting today and February 22nd, you have 12 class days (but you also have to create a working arduino proximity sensor system).
      • This must be a physical example of some aspect of your solution.
    • For each class day, beginning next Tuesday (1/29), you must document your progress in a brief journal (for each date, include a bulleted list of what you have accomplished)

 

 

 

 

Midterm Project Presentations:  Monday, 1/18/19

Midterm Project Grading:

  • 80% based on your presentation, according to this Grading Rubric
  • 20% based on giving feedback (using these forms) --
    1. Sign in to your school Google account
    2. For at least one proposal, for each presenter, provide at least one question, idea, or suggestion that might help the presenter develop the problem/solution.

 

 

Class 39:  Monday, 1/14/19

Warm Up:  None

Today: 

  • Field trip to UVM on 1/31.  Please get form permission form out.  Get it signed and return it before 1/31.
  • Share a link to your midterm project presentation
  • Midterm Project Clarification (see this example) and Grading Rubric
  • Mr. Roy stopping by to answer questions about dual enrollment vouchers
  • Email Mr. Stapleton if you need to have your inventor's notebook re-graded.
Class 38:  Friday, 1/11/19

Warm Up:  None

Today: 

  • Field trip to UVM on 1/31.  Please get form permission form out.  Get it signed and return it before 1/31.
  • Share a link to your midterm project presentation
  • Midterm Project Clarification (see this example) and Grading Rubric
  • Mr. Roy stopping by to answer questions about dual enrollment vouchers
  • Email Mr. Stapleton if you need to have your inventor's notebook re-graded.
Class 37:  Monday, 1/7/19

Warm Up:  None

Today: 

  • Arduino Project
  • Begin preparing midterm project (more details to come -- and work time next week): (Stapleton example -- work in progress)
    1. Brainstorm global problems/solutions
    2. Narrow your search to at least three possibilities, including...
      • At least one that you are excited about
      • At least one that you think is definitely doable, to some extent
      • At least one that would help you, personally
    3. Research each potential problem/solution
      • Clarify the problem (and/or describe its scope)
      • Explain any important concepts relating to your idea
      • Identify the beneficiaries of your solution
      • Describe the prior art.  What attempts to solve this problem, if any, have been made already?
  • Email Mr. Stapleton if you need to have your inventor's notebook re-graded.
Class 36:  Thursday, 1/3/19

Warm Up:  Arduino videos

Make Magazine Introduction To The Arduino

"Learn Arduino in 15 Minutes"

Today: 

  • Return gadget project grading sheets.
  • Arduino equipment didn't arrive on time
  • Mr. Stapleton's arduino project -- solar tracker.
  • Begin preparing midterm project (more details to come -- and work time next week):
    1. Brainstorm global problems/solutions
    2. Narrow your search to at least three possibilities, including...
      • At least one that you are excited about
      • At least one that you think is definitely doable, to some extent
      • At least one that would help you, personally
    3. Research each potential problem/solution
      • Clarify the problem (and/or describe its scope)
      • Identify the beneficiaries of your solution
      • Describe the prior art.  What attempts to solve this problem, if any, have been made already?
  • Fix your inventor's notebooks, if necessary.
Class 35:  Wednesday, 12/19/18

Warm Up:  None

Today: 

Class 34:  Monday, 12/17/18

Warm Up:  None

Today: 

  • Work on your wood and plastic creation (with laser-cut wood, 3-D printed plastic, and box joints).
  • Inventor's Notebook Update Due before break --   Add the following for this project
    1. The Problem: Using the laser cutter and 3-D printer, make a wood and plastic object that incorporates box joints.
    2. Box joint practice: rhino rendering and description of your box with box joints
    3. 3-D Printer Practice:  photo and description of your 3-D printed snowflake
    4. Object planning:  sketch of your object
    5. CAD design:  Include screen shots and/or rhino renderings of your object
    6. Assembled Version 1.0:  Insert nice photo(s) of your assembled object.
Class 33:  Thursday, 12/13/18

Warm Up:  You have 8 days, including 4 full blocks, to create and assemble a wood and plastic object.  How are you going to use your time?

Today: 

  • Work on your wood and plastic creation (with laser-cut wood, 3-D printed plastic, and box joints).
  • Inventor's Notebook Update Due before break --   Add the following for this project
    1. The Problem: Using the laser cutter and 3-D printer, make a wood and plastic object that incorporates box joints.
    2. Box joint practice: rhino rendering and description of your box with box joints
    3. 3-D Printer Practice:  photo and description of your 3-D printed snowflake
    4. Object planning:  sketch of your object
    5. CAD design:  Include screen shots and/or rhino renderings of your object
    6. Assembled Version 1.0:  Insert nice photo(s) of your assembled object.
Class 32:  Tuesday, 12/11/18

Warm Up:  You should be at or beyond step three (below) today.

Today: 

  • Dual Enrollment Information.  Get the "I want to take this college course for EHS credit" form (also available from guidance).
  • Current Design Project:  Create a wood and plastic "gadget" incorporating laser-cut box joints and at least one 3-D printed component.  Steps: 
    1. Make a virtual box with box joints.  this Google Drive folder.
    2. 3-D Printer practice -- 3-D print a 0.07" thick snowflake
    3. Sketch your gadget
    4. Create a virtual version of your object, in Rhino
      1. 0.2" thick wood
      2. Keep your plastic components small
    5. Create a Wood/plastic Version 1.0
      1. 3-D print your plastic part(s)
      2. Laser cut your wooden parts
      3. Assemble
  • Inventor's Notebook Update Due on 12/21 --   Add the following for this project
    1. The Problem: Using the laser cutter and 3-D printer, make a wood and plastic object that incorporates box joints.
    2. Box joint practice: rhino rendering and description of your box with box joints
    3. 3-D Printer Practice:  photo and description of your 3-D printed snowflake
    4. Object planning:  sketch of your object
    5. CAD design:  Include screen shots and/or rhino renderings of your object
    6. Assembled Version 1.0:  Insert nice photo(s) of your assembled object.
Class 31:  Friday, 12/7/18

Warm Up:   What should you be working on today?

Today: 

  • Dual Enrollment Information.  To sign up for dual enrollment, follow these directions.  In step 1, you're going to need additional voucher instructions found on this sheet.
  • Current Design Project:  Create a wood and plastic "gadget" incorporating laser-cut box joints and at least one 3-D printed component.  Bolt(s) and nut(s) are optional.  Steps: 
    1. Practice making box joint connections.
    2. 3-D Printer practice
      1. Create a snowflake that is 0.07" thick and which fits in a 3" circle
      2. Find 3 partners and create one Rhino file that fits all 4 of your snowflakes into an 8" x 8" area.
      3. Name this file something sensible (e.g. all of group's intials, followed by "snowflakes")
      4.  Change the model units to millimeters (allow scaling).
      5. Save as "...scaled in mm"
      6. "Save as" an .stl file.
      7. Open Cura
        1. select the "Ultimaker 2."
        2. Select "open file" and open your group's .stl file.
        3. Under "build plate adhesion," Choose "skirt"
        4. "save to removable drive"
      8. Save the file on an SD card and email the file to Adam Repash, in the library maker space (arepash@ewsd.org).  Explain to Adam that you are going to use the SD card, but that you wanted him to have an extra copy of the file in case you have trouble with the SD card.
      9. Go to the maker space and print your snowflakes.
    3. Sketch
    4. Create a virtual version of your object, in Rhino
    5. Wood/plastic Version 1.0

 

Homework

Class 30:  Wednesday, 12/5/18

Warm Up:   None

Today: 

  • Dual Enrollment Information on Friday.  The class is set up.
  • Project Update:  Create a wood and plastic "gadget" incorporating laser-cut box joints and at least one 3-D printed component.  Bolt(s) and nut(s) are optional.  Steps: 
    1. Practice making box joint connections.
    2. 3-D Printer practice
      1. Create a snowflake that is 0.07" thick and which fits in a 3" circle
      2. Find 3 partners and create one Rhino file that fits all 4 of your snowflakes into an 8" x 8" area.
      3. Name this file something sensible (e.g. all of group's intials, followed by "snowflakes")
      4.  Change the model units to millimeters (allow scaling).
      5. Save as "...scaled in mm"
      6. "Save as" an .stl file.
      7. Open Cura
        1. select the "Ultimaker 2."
        2. Select "open file" and open your group's .stl file.
        3. Under "build plate adhesion," Choose "skirt"
        4. "save to removable drive"
      8. Save the file on an SD card and email the file to Adam Repash, in the library maker space (arepash@ewsd.org).  Explain to Adam that you are going to use the SD card, but that you wanted him to have an extra copy of the file in case you have trouble with the SD card.
      9. Go to the maker space and print your snowflakes.
    3. Sketch
    4. Hand-made prototype (can be very rough)
    5. Cardboard prototype
    6. Laser and 3-D printing fit tests (e.g. How big do hexagonal holes need to be to appropriately accommodate hex nuts?  How much will plastic holes shrink or fill in?)
    7. Wood/plastic prototype
    8. Wood/plastic finished piece

 

Homework

Class 29:  Monday, 12/3/18

Warm Up:  

The diameter of the bean can plug, shown on the right, was 3", and the thickness was about 0.1". 

1.  How long do you think it took to 3-D print?

2.  How many grams of ABS plastic do you think were used?  Answers:

Today: 

  • Finish CAD joinery practice -- In Rhino, design a laser-cut box with box joint connections between adjacent sides and specified dimensions (see thumbnail table, below).  The box will be made of 0.15" cardboard.
    • In Rhino, color the sides of the box so that no similarly-colored sides touch.  Upload the file to your Google Drive, set the shared settings to "anyone with a link," and upload your file to this Google Drive folder.
  • Continue steps below (sketch, rough handmade prototype...)
  • Project Update:  Create a wood and plastic "gadget" incorporating laser-cut box joints and at least one 3-D printed component, and one or more nuts & bolts (1/4" 20tpi bolts) that serve a purpose. Steps: 
    1. Practice making box joint connections.
    2. 3-D Printer practice
      1. Create a snowflake that is 0.07" thick and which fits in a 3" circle
      2. Find 3 partners and create one Rhino file that fits all 4 of your snowflakes into an 8" x 8" area.
      3. Name this file something sensible (e.g. all of group's intials, followed by "snowflakes")
      4.  Change the model units to millimeters (allow scaling).
      5. Save as "...scaled in mm"
      6. "Save as" an .stl file.
      7. Open Cura
        1. select the "Ultimaker 2."
        2. Select "open file" and open your group's .stl file.
        3. Under "build plate adhesion," Choose "skirt"
        4. "save to removable drive"
      8. Save the file on an SD card and email the file to Adam Repash, in the library maker space (arepash@ewsd.org).  Explain to Adam that you are going to use the SD card, but that you wanted him to have an extra copy of the file in case you have trouble with the SD card.
      9. Go to the maker space and print your snowflakes.
    3. Sketch
    4. Hand-made prototype (can be very rough)
    5. Cardboard prototype
    6. Laser and 3-D printing fit tests (e.g. How big do hexagonal holes need to be to appropriately accommodate hex nuts?  How much will plastic holes shrink or fill in?)
    7. Wood/plastic prototype
    8. Wood/plastic finished piece
  • Tentative Plan for Midterm Assessment -- Arduino Project

 

Homework

Class 28:  Thursday, 11/29/18

Warm Up:  

What's a "box joint?"

Today: 

  • Class in computer lab
  • Return version 3.0 grading sheets
  • Project Update:  Create a wood and plastic "gadget" incorporating laser-cut box joints and at least one 3-D printed component, and one or more nuts & bolts (1/4" 20tpi bolts) that serve a purpose. Steps: 
    1. Practice making box joint connections.
    2. Sketch
    3. Hand-made prototype
    4. Cardboard prototype
    5. Laser and 3-D printing fit tests (e.g. How big do hexagonal holes need to be to appropriately accommodate hex nuts?  How much will plastic holes shrink or fill in?)
    6. Wood/plastic prototype
    7. Wood/plastic finished piece
  • Tentative Plan for Midterm Assessment -- Arduino Project
  • Today's work:  CAD joinery practice -- In Rhino, design a laser-cut box with box joint connections between adjacent sides and specified dimensions (see thumbnail table, below).  The box will be made of 0.15" cardboard.
    • In Rhino, color the sides of the box so that no similarly-colored sides touch.  Upload the file to your Google Drive, set the shared settings to "anyone with a link," and upload your file to this Google Drive folder.
    • Some useful commands...
      • Box
      • Extrude planar surface
      • Boolean difference ("delete yes" and "delete no")
      • Move (Judiciously utilizing Ortho and Osnap)
      • Rotate (not 3-d)
      • Mirror
    • Required box dimensions for each student.  These are the dimensions of the outside wall.

Homework Brainstorm project ideas

Class 27:  Tuesday, 11/27/18

Warm Up:  

Interpret the graph on the right and relate it to our contest.

Today: 

  • Award donuts to winners
  • Inventor's notebooks (boat version 3.0) are due today.  Here's the grading rubric (Boat Version 3.0 Grading)
  • Next project:  Create a wood and plastic classroom/office tool/gadget incorporating laser-cut "dovetails," at least one 3-D printed component, and nuts & bolts (1/4" 20tpi bolts). Possible steps: 
    • Research -- needs, prior art
    • Sketch
    • Hand-made prototype
    • Cardboard prototype
    • Laser and 3-D printing fit tests (e.g. How big do hexagonal holes need to be to appropriately accommodate hex nuts?  How much will plastic holes shrink or fill in?)
    • Wood/plastic prototype
    • Wood/plastic finished piece

Homework Brainstorm project ideas

Class 26:    Wednesday, 11/15/18

Warm Up:  

None

Today: 

  • Calculate boat velocities.  Follow these directions (calculating velocities from a video) and share your results by filling out this form (boat data form).
  • Add the final, laser-cut boat to your inventor's notebook.  Include these components...
    • Rhino rendering of your finished boat with water, lights, and shadow
    • Nice photo of the boat -- not a screen shot from the video
    • Data -- terminal velocity, scaled weight (how much it would weigh if it were 12 feet long), scaled capacity (how much weight it could hold if it were 12 feet long.
    • Reflections -- thoughts about your boat and/or the project
Class 25:    Monday, 11/12/18

Warm Up:  

What does "render" mean, in the context of CAD?

Today: 

  • Finish and assemble boats
  • Final testing -- donuts for the winner(s)
  • Add the final, laser-cut boat to your inventor's notebook.  Include these components...
    • Rhino rendering of your finished boat with water, lights, and shadow
    • Nice photo of the boat -- not a screen shot from the video
    • Data -- terminal velocity, scaled weight (how much it would weigh if it were 12 feet long), scaled capacity (how much weight it could hold if it were 12 feet long.
    • Reflections -- thoughts about your boat and/or the project
Class 24:    Thursday, 11/8/18

Warm Up:  

None

Today: 

  • Finish and assemble boats
  • Final testing -- donuts for the winner(s)
  • Add the final, laser-cut boat to your inventor's notebook.  Include these components
    • Rhino rendering with lights and shadow
    • Nice photo of the boat -- not a screen shot from the video
    • Data -- terminal velocity, scaled weight (how much it would weigh if it were 12 feet long), scaled capacity (how much weight it could hold if it were 12 feet long.
    • Reflections -- thoughts about your boat and/or the project

 Homework:  none

Class 23:    Tuesday, 11/6/18

Warm Up:  

Additions to our list of global challenges

Today: 

  • Today --
    • Laser Cutter Quiz, 2nd try.
    • Prepare boats for laser cutting (final version --3.0)
      • Scale your boat to be 12 inches long.
      • Unroll and arrange parts on virtual 23.5" x 11.5" sheet(s) of cardboard (in top view).  Consider symmetry and the grain of the cardboard.
      • Use the "make 2-D drawing command"
    • Make and assemble boats

 Homework:  

Class 22:    Friday, 11/2/18

Warm Up:  

Brainstorm a list of Global Challenges

Today: 

  • Today --
    • Laser Cutter Quiz.  Next chance will be next class.  You must score 100% to use the laser cutter alone.
    • Prepare boats for laser cutting (final version --3.0)
      • Scale your boat to be 12 inches long.
      • Unroll and arrange parts on virtual 23.5" x 11.5" sheet(s) of cardboard (in top view).  Consider symmetry and the grain of the cardboard.
      • Use the "make 2-D drawing command"
    • Make and assemble boats

 Homework:  

Class 21:    Wednesday, 10/31/18

Warm Up:  

1.  Is it okay to open the laser cutter while it is cutting?  Explain.

2.  Name one material that you shouldn't cut on the laser cutter.

3.  What are two risks associated with using the laser cutter? (and what can you do about them?)

4.  Who can use the laser cutter?

5.  When can you use the laser cutter?

Today:  Last day of Quarter 1

  • Let's take a look at some inventor's notebooks.  They're due tonight, by midnight. Is yours ready to go?  Check it against the boat problem grading rubric.
  • Go over  PDF -- laser cutter rules and produres.  There will be a quiz next class (Friday)
  • Today -- Prepare boats for laser cutting (final version --3.0)
    • Scale your boat to be 12 inches long.
    • Unroll and arrange parts on virtual 23.5" x 11.5" sheet(s) of cardboard (in top view).  Consider symmetry and the grain of the cardboard.
    • Use the "make 2-D drawing command"
  • Friday
  • Tuesday:  final assembly and final testing

 Homework:  

Class 20:    Monday, 10/29/18

Warm Up:  

1.  How does the Snipping Tool work?

2.  Apply the boat problem grading rubric to Mr. Stapleton's boat project.

Today:

  • Look at some inventor's notebooks.  Consider boat problem grade based on the rubric.  Link to boat problem.
  • Fix up inventor's notebooks.  See class #17 for details.
  • Get handout:  PDF -- laser cutter rules and produres.
  • Next class -- Prepare boats for laser cutting (final version --3.0)
    • Scale all boats to be 12 inches long.
    • Unroll and arrange parts on virtual 23.5" x 11.5" sheet(s) of cardboard (in top view).  Consider symmetry and the grain of the cardboard.
    • Use the 2-D drawing command
  • Friday?
  • Next Tuesday?:  final assembly and final testing

  • 1st quarter ends before we will finish this project, so the first quarter grade will include

    • first inventor's notebook check,

    • trebuchet project score,

    • boat project (inventor's notebook scored through version 2.0 -- Final boat version will go on 2nd quarter)

 Homework:  

Class 19:    Thursday, 10/25/18

Warm Up:  

None

Today:

  • Testing of boat versions 2

  • 1st quarter ends before we will finish this project, so the first quarter grade will include

    • first inventor's notebook check,

    • trebuchet project score,

    • boat project (inventor's notebook scored through version 2.0 -- Final boat version will go on 2nd quarter)

 Homework:  

Class 18:    Tuesday, 10/23/18

Warm Up:  

None

Today:

  • Get your Inventor's notebook up-to-date.  If you need help, ask a classmate.
    • Create your own new Inventor's Notebook sub-pages according to the requirements described here... Boat Problem and Constraints
    • Boat testing videos should be on the Student Common drive, in the Stapleton Designing Solutions Folder
    • "Publish" your inventor's notebook.
    • Remove unnecessary pages and subpages
    • Test your Google Site and make sure that all of the links work correctly
    • Have someone else test your published site to make sure that the share settings are allowing anyone to see your pictures.

 Homework:  None

Class 17:    Wednesday, 10/17/18

Warm Up:  

1) How and 2) when should you test your boat's maximum capacity?

Today:

  • Inventor's notebook fixes for trebuchet project are due today
  • No boat work on Tuesday.  That day should be spent catching up on your inventor's notebook. 
  • Boat work:
    • Do a lot of incremental saves as you create your boats.  Name your files so that you can identify which version they correspond to.
    • Make and test boats. Create two versions and pick the best one for a final, laser-cut version.
    • Prepare for Tuesday work:
      • Mr. Stapleton will be in Montana.  Your Tuesday task is to add your boat information to your inventor's notebook.
      • Preparation will require testing, photographing, and sinking your boats.
      • Create your own new Inventor's Notebook sub-pages according to the requirements described here... Boat Problem and Constraints
  • Rhino Tips and Commands Web Page

 Homework:  

Class 16:    Monday, 10/15/18

Warm Up:   How to use the boat contest calculator...

Today:

  • Note:  for testing purposes, the added weight for a 12 foot boat has been changed to 500 pounds.
  • Boat work:
    • Do a lot of incremental saves as you create your boats.  Name your files so that you can identify which version they correspond to.
    • Make and test boats. Create two versions and pick the best one for a final, laser-cut version.
    • Fix your inventor's notebook by Wednesday, if you want the trebuchet pages to be re-graded.
  •  Boat Problem and Constraints
  • Rhino Tips and Commands Web Page

 Homework:  Inventor's notebook fixes for trebuchet project due by 10/17

Class 15:    Thursday, 10/10/18

Warm Up: 

1.  Suppose a cube of wood has a mass of 1 pound.  How much mass would a cube of the same wood have if it were twice as tall as the first cube? How about 3 times as tall?

 

If your boat is scaled up to 12 feet, it should stably support 350 pounds.

2.  Suppose your boat is actually 10 inches long.  By what scale factor would it need to be multiplied to scale it up to 12 feet?

3.  How much weight must your 10 inch long boat support? 

 

Today:

 Homework:  Inventor's notebook fixes for trebuchet project due by 10/17

Class 14:    Monday, 10/8/18

Warm Up: 

1.  Suppose you need to design a boat that will hold 200 pounds without sinking.  How do you design such a boat?

2.  How can you measure boat capacity in Rhino?

 

Today:

 Homework:  Inventor's notebook fixes for trebuchet project due by 10/17

Class 13:    Thursday, 10/4/18

Warm Up: 

1.  Can you guess what I would most like to change about my hornet mask?

2.  Rhino has an "incremental save" command that is very useful.  Can you guess what it does?

3.  Once you design something in Rhino, what's the easiest way to turn the design into a real object?

4.  What are some other options for building a CAD designed object?

 

Today:

 Homework:

Class 12: Tuesday, 10/2/18

Warm Up:  Scenes from Pumpkin Chuckin'

Today:

  • Today's Class in Computer Lab
  • Trebuchet Inventor's Notebook grades are in PowerSchool. 
  • Next class -- Reflect on trebuchet project, Google Sites, etc. (because we don't have the library computer lab on Thursday, but we do today).
  • Begin New project -- Make a helmet/mask using Rhino (CAD)
  • Helmet/Mask Project Guidelines

 Homework: Within the next two weeks you can fix your inventor's notebook and receive full credit.

Class 11: Friday, 9/28/18

Warm Up:  Prepare your siege engines!

Today:

  • Get ready for the contest.  We will probably be holding the competition in the auditorium.
    • Anticipate the materials that you will need, and take them with you.  You may want tape, extra fishing line, etc.
  • Finish your inventor's notebook.  The deadline is tonight.  All of the pages relating to versions 1.0 and 2.0 must be completed.  Completion of version 3.0 pages may offset some shortcomings relating to versions 1.0 and 2.0.

 Homework: Finish your inventor's notebook before tomorrow.

Classes 9 and 10: Monday, 9/24 and Wednesday, 9/26

Mr. Stapleton is attending a funeral in Georgia.  You know where things are and where they should be returned.  Please do a good job cleaning up!  Also, share the rebar weights.  There should be plenty of weight to go around if no one has weights hidden away that are not being used.

Specific Plans for Monday:  Wrap up your building and experimentation.  Get your trebuchet ready for competition on Friday.  You may want to weigh your projectile and trim it until its weight is close to (but not less than) 3.6 grams.

Wednesday Plan:  The main focus should be on completing your inventor's notebook pages.  If you did not get to a version 3.0, then just stop at 2.0.  Make sure that the pages are linked, and that the links work.  If you want to change the format, that is okay, but keep the same pages with the same titles as the template.

Participation in Friday's contest is mandatory.  You need to have a working trebuchet, even if it's no good.  You will get three throws.  Your score will be determined by the distance your projectile travels in the air.  Only your best throw counts.  We will be throwing in a location where your projectile will not hit the ceiling.

Homework: Work on your Inventor's notebook.  It is due on Friday at midnight.

Class 8: Thursday, 9/20/18

Warm Up:  There was a problem (photo on right).  I designed solution version 1.0, which was a "where does it belong" quiz, below.  The results of version 1.0 are on the right (photo taken after class on Tuesday).  Please help me brainstorm ideas for a more effective solution to the problem.

 

Today:

  1. Another way to solve video format problems with an Iphone -- in camera settings, choose "most compatible."
  2. Test and experiment with your trebuchet version 2.0, document with photos/videos.  It would be good to include some data (throw distances, for example)

** I realized that I didn't create links to all of the subpages.  You will have to do that at some point.

Upcoming Classes:

  • Today  -- test version 2.0
  • Monday (9/24) -- build and tune final version 3.0.
  • Next Wednesday and Friday -- complete inventor's notebook entries (due Friday night).
  • Next Friday -- contest for prizes (≥ fruit snacks)
  • September 30th -- Actual VT Pumpkin Chuckin Competition, in case you want to make a big version of your trebuchet, and compete.

Homework: Update your inventor's notebook through the planning stage of Version 2.0.

Class 7: Tuesday, 9/18/18

Warm Up:

The Where Does It Belong? Quiz

1. Bolt cutters    2. Tape    3.  Safety glasses    4. Hot glue sticks    5. Rulers

6. Pliers    7.  Scissors    8.  New wood    9. Wood scraps    10.  Hot glue scraper

11. Heat gun    12. Fishing line    13.  Hot glue gun    14.  Hand drill    15.  Nice set of drill bits

16.  Tape measure    17.  Paper clips    18.  Metal file    19.  Sandpaper 

20.  Broom and dust pan    21.   Shop vac

Today:

  1. Who has shared a notebook and who has begun filling in the important parts?  Check powerschool.  I will soon be adding a weight to the notebook check grade.  That weight is currently zero.
  2. How to solve lightning cable video transfer problems from iphones to computers:  Go to settings -- photos -- transfer to mac or pc -- select "keep originals."  Iphones are now using HEIC and HEVC files, instead of .jpeg and .mov.  Trouble happens when phones try to convert videos during transfer.  Windows 10 can show and play the original HEIC (high efficiency image format) and HEVC (high efficiency video coding) files.  Windows 7 can't play them, but even if you can't see the video, you can upload it to YouTube and your Google Drive (I think).
  3. Check out the "coach my video" app.
  4. Finish version 2.0, document with photos/videos. 

** I realized that I didn't create links to all of the subpages.  You will have to do that at some point.

Upcoming Classes:

  • Today and Thursday -- test version 2.0
  • Monday (9/24) -- build and tune final version 3.0.
  • Next Wednesday and Friday -- complete inventor's notebook entries (due Friday night).
  • Next Friday -- contest for prizes (≥ fruit snacks)
  • September 30th -- Actual VT Pumpkin Chuckin Competition, in case you want to make a big version of your trebuchet, and compete.

** I realized that I didn't create links to all of the subpages.  You will have to do that at some point.

Homework: Update your inventor's notebook through the planning stage of Version 2.0.

Class 6: Friday, 9/14/18

Warm Up:  How do you change the bit in the drill press, and how do you reposition the bit?  What's the chuck? What's the chuck key?  What's a keyless chuck and what's the special trick for working a keyless chuck?  How and why might you want to reverse the drill rotation direction?

Today:

  1. Check out the "coach my video" app.
  2. Design an entirely new version of your trebuchet, version 2.0.  Reuse parts whenever possible, but feel free to discard ruined materials.  Do not throw away the rebar.  You can remove hot glue with pliers or the heat gun.  Put burnable pieces of wood in the scrap wood box.  A little bit of hot glue is okay.  Keep in mind that you will also build a 3.0.

** I realized that I didn't create links to all of the subpages.  You will have to do that at some point.

Homework: ** I plan to check these before next class -- probably on Monday.

  • Share your Google Site with Mr. Stapleton
  • Make sure that you have something in the Research, Brainstorming, and Planning Your Deisgn sub-pages in your inventor's notebook.
Class 5: Wednesday, 9/12/18

Warm Up: 

1.  What can we learn from this slow-motion video?

2.  How can you insert a video like this into your Inventor's Notebook?

Today:

  1. Announce Women Can Do conference
  2. Document your prototype version 1.0 in the "planning your design" main page. (or at least prepare to do so, before you destroy your evidence.)
    • In the  "completed prototype" subpage, insert one or more photo(s) of your trebuchet.
    •  For the "testing, reflections, and modifications" sub page...
      • create a slow motion video and embed it
        • Upload it to your google drive, change your permission to public (or anyone with a link).
        • Copy the link
        • Click the "insert" tab in your Google Site.  Then select "embed," to paste your link onto your web page.
      • Use text or a screencast to describe your observations and inferences relating to the slow motion video.  If you create a screencast, just embed the screencast and include text explaining that your observations are shared in the screencast. [Here's a link to some tutorials on using a chrome plug-in called "screencastify."  If you're using a desktop, you will need a microphone.  Most laptops should have internal microphones built in.]
    • Publish your Google Site and send  jstapleton@ewsd.org.
  3. Experiment with your version 1.0 trebuchet.  Don't be afraid to break it in the process.  Some variables you might want to modify are: sling length, finger angle, counterweight mass, arm thickness, and attachment to floor, but don't limit yourself to those.  Try whatever you want, and abuse your prototype as much as is necessary.
    • Describe what you learned from the experiments, if anything.
    • Insert more videos if it helps you explain your findings.
  4. Probably next class --- When you're done experimenting with version 1.0, begin building an entirely new trebuchet, version 2.0.  Reuse parts whenever possible, but feel free to discard ruined materials.  Put burnable pieces of wood in the scrap wood box.  A little bit of hot glue is okay.  Keep in mind that you will also build a 3.0.

** I realized that I didn't create links to all of the subpages.  You will have to do that at some point.

Homework:

  • Share your Google Site with Mr. Stapleton
  • Make sure that you have something in the Research, Brainstorming, and Planning Your Deisgn sub-pages in your inventor's notebook.
Class 4: Monday, 9/10/18

Warm Up:

1)  How does a trebuchet get its energy?

2)  How can you tell if your trebuchet is making efficent use of its available energy?

3)  What's the best way to learn as much as you can about your trebuchet's performance?

Today:

  • Get your projectile.
  • How to tie loops.
  • Try to finish your first prototype and shoot a projectile before the end of class today

Homework:

  • Share your Google Site with Mr. Stapleton
  • Make sure that you have finished the Research, Brainstorming, and Design Planning sub-pages in your inventor's notebook.
Class 3: Thursday, 9/6/18

Warm Up:

1.  Log on to a computer and open this Google Site Template

 

Today:

  • Create a Google Site using this template.  Insert evidence of your research, brainstorming, and design planning.
  • Upcoming plans:
    • Continued from last class --  Document your research, brainstorming, and initial design drawing.  You will be inserting these into a Google Site next class.
      • Research:  Collect and save some documentation of research (e.g. pictures of existing designs, helpful text, etc.)
      • Brainstorming:  Create and save a collection of thoughts about your design.  These could be pictures, notes, or both.  You can create the list o
      • Plan the Design:  Photograph or scan your design drawing.  Save it for insertion into a Google Site next class.
        • Create a drawing of a trebuchet prototype that you can build quickly.  The goal here is to get something working quickly so that you can learn more about the problems associated with your design.  Try to simplify your design as much as possible, with the understanding that you will create more refined versions.
        • Modify your drawing as necessary in order to simplify.
    • Begin working on a prototype that you can complete and be ready to shoot in one full block.

Homework:

  • Get your course expectations signed and then return them.
Class 2: Tuesday, 9/4/18

Warm Up:

1.  Triangles are often incorporated into structures, because they add stability.  Why are triangles stable?

2.  If you wanted to easily wiggle the frame trebuchet on the right, where would you push it, and in what direction?

 

Today:

  • Turn-in course expectations.
  • Trip to Mr. Stapleton's van to get boxes and supplies.
  • Assemble and label your box
  • Trebuchet Problem parameters and constraints
  • Upcoming plans:
    • Today --  Document your research, brainstorming, and initial design drawing.  You will be inserting these into a Google Site next class.
      • Research:  Collect and save some documentation of research (e.g. pictures of existing designs, helpful text, etc.)
      • Brainstorming:  Create and save a collection of thoughts about your design.  These could be pictures, notes, or both.  You can create the list o
      • Plan the Design:  Photograph or scan your design drawing.  Save it for insertion into a Google Site next class.
        • Create a drawing of a trebuchet prototype that you can build quickly.  The goal here is to get something working quickly so that you can learn more about the problems associated with your design.  Try to simplify your design as much as possible, with the understanding that you will create more refined versions.
        • Modify your drawing as necessary in order to simplify.
      • Begin work.
    • Thursday -- Complete a working prototype

Homework:

  • Get your course expectations signed and then return them.
Class 1: Thursday, 8/30/18

Designing Solutions: Mr. Stapleton

Warm Up:

Match the "steps" below to the numbers in engineering design cycle diagram.  Keep in mind that the design cycle is flexible.  There really is no right solution to this task.

Build a Prototype,

Conduct Research,

Plan The design,

Brainstorm Ideas,

Identify and Clarify the Problem,

Test The Design,

Present Your Solution

Google image search for "engineering design cycle"

Today:

Handouts:

Homework:

  • Get your course expectations signed and then return them.
  • Brainstorm ideas and design a trebuchet prototype.