Class 22: Friday, 10/29/21

Warm Up:  

1.  Is there anything wrong with the diagram on the right?

2.  Why is the north pole of a magnet called the "north" pole?

 

Today:

  • Magnetism Notes
    • Electricity & Magnetism Projects:  Complete at least two of the following projects.  One project must be the magnetic pickup, because we will use that in the next unit.
      • Solenoid Buzzer:  Watch this instructional video showing how to make a Solenoid Buzzer.  Draw a sketch of a solenoid buzzer design that uses only the materials below:
        •  wood, nails, hot glue/glue guns, duct tape, enameled wire, sandpaper, saw, strips of magnetizable steel (approx 0.5" wide, 3" long), and a D.C. power source. 
        • With those materials, you will have to make a working solenoid buzzer -- alone or in pairs.  You may cut, glue, or tape things, but you will not be allowed to nail or drill.  Nailing and drilling are not necessary.
      • Electric Motor
      • Speaker
  • Magnetic Pickup (a form of generator)

Homework:  

  • None
Class 21: Wednesday, 10/27/21

Warm Up:   What is a solenoid?  How does it work?

Today:

  • Work time -- finish the wiring project and turn in your model.
  • If you're done early, begin the first magnetism project...
    • Watch this instructional video showing how to make a Solenoid Buzzer.  Draw a sketch of a solenoid buzzer design that uses only the materials below:
      •  wood, nails, hot glue/glue guns, duct tape, enameled wire, sandpaper, saw, strips of magnetizable steel (approx 0.5" wide, 3" long), and a D.C. power source. 
      • With those materials, you will have to make a working solenoid buzzer -- alone or in pairs.  You may cut, glue, or tape things, but you will not be allowed to nail or drill.  Nailing and drilling are not necessary.

Homework:  

  • None
Class 20: Monday, 10/25/21

Warm Up:  

When electric current flows through an electric motor, a force is produced, causing motion. 

An electric motor forced into motion generates electric current.

I have three identical corded drills and one driver bit.  With no additional materials, how can we power two of the drills by plugging just one of them into the wall?

 

Today:

  •  Work time -- finish the project and turn in your model.
  • Next Unit -- Electricity and Magnetism

Homework:  

  • None
Class 19: Wednesday, 10/20/21

Warm Up:  

What is a Jacob's Ladder?  What is its purpose?

Today:

  •  Cabin Wiring Project Updates:
    • How to make good connections
    • How to avoid short circuits
    • Color coding with bulbs -- and why
    • What to turn in

Homework:  

  • None
Electrical-panel-fh17mar_576_06_401-1.jpg (1200×1200)Class 18: Tuesday, 10/19/21

Warm Up:   The pictures on the right show breaker panels.

1. What is the purpose of a breaker?

2. How does an electrician decide how many breakers are needed?

3.  Why are there different kinds of breakers?

Today:

Homework:  

  • None
Class 17: Friday, 10/15/21

Warm Up:  

1.  Why is the guy in the video wearing a metal suit?

2.  Why are the sparks jagged?

3.  What else do you notice the sparks doing?

Today:

  • Quiz
  • IM TC  Jagged spark Jacob's ladder?  our tc?
  • If there's time...You're going to be designing and wiring a model of a simple (but comfortable) electrically-powered cabin.  Let's brainstorm a list of basic electrical needs.

Homework:  

  • Quiz on Friday.  Study.
Class 17: Wednesday, 10/13/21

Warm Up:   Let's build the circuits on the right, and find the missing information, with the PhET DC Circuit Kit.

 

Today:

Homework:  

  • Quiz on Friday.  Study.
Class 16: Thursday, 10/07/21

Warm Up:   The purpose of a fuse is to open a circuit when the current gets too high.  How can we set up a demonstration of this with light bulbs, a power source, and a fuse?

 

Today:

Homework:  

  • None
Class 15: Tuesday, 10/05/21

Warm Up:   What can Tango and Cash teach us about electricity?

 

Today:

Homework:  

  • None
Class 14: Friday, 9/30/21

Warm Up:   The deceptively complicated case of the electrified pickle...

  Why does the pickle light up Why does it light up on just one end?  Is it always the same end?

joule heating

Electric Arc

Arc lamp

Hyperphysics electric pickle info

 

Today:

  • Return and review quizzes
  • Finish the PhET simulation

Homework:  

  • None
Class 13: Wednesday, 9/29/21

Warm Up:   How can you start a fire with a 9 Volt Battery and some steel?

  

Today:

Homework:  

  • None
Class 12: Monday, 9/27/21

Warm Up:   Can we recreate some of the experiments performed by the "brainiacs?"  Do we want to?

  

Today:

  • Review the practice quiz through #13.
  • Finish the practice quiz and discuss the answers.  Practice Quiz answers  Talk about Wednesday's quiz.  Maybe do some verbal quizzing.
  • The new unit -- Electric Current and Circuits
  • Look at a D.C. circuit -- pHet simulation?

Online Textbook Links:   Chapter 19, Introduction to Electrical Circuits

Homework:  

  • Study for quiz next class
Class 11: Thursday, 9/23/21

Warm Up:   There is a "pith ball" hanging next to the Van de Graaff generator.  The pith ball is foam that is covered with a conductive, metallic paint.  What do you think will happen when the Vand de Graaff generator is turned on?  Why?

  

Today:

Online Textbook Links:

 

Homework:  

  • Complete 1-13 on the practice quiz  PDF
Class 10: Tuesday, 9/21/21

Warm Up:   Which of the following can we say with certainty?  Why?

A)  The balloons have the same net charge

B)  The cat and the foam "peanuts" have opposite net charges.

C)  Both A and B are correct.

D)  None of these answers is (are) correct.

  Today:

 

Homework:  

  • None
Class 9: Friday, 9/15/21

Warm Up:  

How does a Van de Graaff Generator Work?

  Today:

Homework:  

  • None, unless you would like to retake your quiz.  If you want to do a retake, study the Quizlets.
Class 8: Wednesday, 9/13/21

Warm Up:  

1.  If you rub a balloon on your head and then hold it next to your hair, your hair is attracted to the balloon.  Why?

2.  Your hair may also stand on end after being rubbed by a balloon.  Why?

3.  The balloon may stick to the wall or ceiling.  Why?

4.  This all works better in drier air.  Why?

5.  What events contributed to this gas station fire?

  Today:

Homework:  

  • None
Class 7: Monday, 9/13/21

Warm Up:   None -- change of plans due to weather forecast

  Today:

  • Rocket rebuild, launch, and maybe find time aloft.
  • We're not measuring burnout velocity, so you don't need to measure your rocket's height.
  • Quiz on Wednesday, instead of today.
  • Remember to mark the quizlet complete when you've finished it.

Homework:  

  • None
Class 6: Thursday, 9/9/21

Warm Up:  

1.  Which do you think lasts longer, the flight up or the flight down?

2.  Why does adding weight to a rocket make it go higher?

 Today:

  • Take a look at some sensor data.
  • Complete the Rocket Analysis
  • Make a decision -- Do we want to rebuild and launch one more time, or do we want to go ahead and start on electricity?

Homework:  

  • There are two quizlet assignments in Google Classroom.  Study both quizlets.  You should study them until you know the information, but when you've studied each one at least once, you can mark each assignment complete.
  • There will be a simple quiz next class.  The quiz will have the same questions as the quizlets,  plus you will have to measure a line in appropriate metric units of your choice.  If you don't do well on the quiz, you can have another try.
Class 5: Tuesday, 9/7/21

Warm Up:  Video Practice -- If you have a phone, take it out and get a video of this object that I am about to launch in the room.  Keeping your camera still the whole time, video with the highest frame rate (slowest motion) that your phone will allow.  Try to capture the entire flight.

Today:

  • Finish assembly and measure rockets.
    • Make sure that there's ventilation in the probe area.
    • Add "rocket length" to your rocket data sheet.
    • Fill out your data sheet and turn it in.
  • Launch rockets
    • Video your rocket with a phone.  Record the entire flight in slow motion.  We have a Samsung Galaxy that you can use.
    • Measure altitude with the Pocketlab Voyager sensor.
  • Return to the classroom.  If there's time...
    • Download the data from the Pocketlab Voyager sensors.
    • Upload your video to your Google Drive

Homework: None.

Class 4: Thursday, 9/2/21

Warm Up:

1.  Why can't we "see our breath" right now?

2.  When we do see our breath, what are we actually seeing?

3.  I made a video showing how I can make my breath visible at will.  Can you tell how I did it?

Today:

Homework: None.  Be ready to launch your rocket on Tuesday!

Class 3: Tuesday, 8/31/21

Warm Up:

The air around us is pressurized to about 14.7psi.

1.  What does 14.7psi mean?

2.  What evidence is there that there is air pressure around us?

3.  We are going to measure the heights of your rocket flights using a pressure sensor.  How will a pressure sensor tell the height of the rocket?

 

Today:

  • Take attendance
  • Student info sheet -- A3/4 Only
  • Water Rocket Design:
    • Provided materials -- 1 meter of duct tape, Two 2-liter bottles, DVDs, Hot Glue
    • **New requirement: your rocket must incorporate a chamber for storing an air pressure sensor.  The
    • Get bottles and decide which one you will use for a pressure chamber (fuselage).  Don't cut into this bottle!
    • Use Clifford Heath's Water Rocket Simulation to plan your design.  Record your data and draw your design on this Rocket Design sheet. PDF Version
      • Use the digital calipers to measure the nozzle diameter (same as the launcher plug diameter, which is easier to measure).
      • Find the pressure chamber bottle diameter (using the big calipers)
      • Use the Clifford Heath's simulation to determine the best combination of water and dry mass.  Write down the best volume of water and the best dry mass.
      • Measure the mass of your pressure chamber bottle.  Subtract it from your dry mass to figure out how much mass your fins, tape, and other additions should have.
      • **Make a sketch of rocket design.  On the diagram, include the following:
        • Names of your group members
        • Labels for the materials that you plan to use for fins, weights, and other purposes 
        • Write down the best amount of water and the best dry mass, according to Clifford Heath's simulator.  Write: "water volume = ____" and "dry mass = ______"

Homework: None

Class 2: Friday, 8/27/21

Image result for cat falling from buildingWarm Up:

According to this article, emergency clinic records of 132 cats that jumped from windows of buildings showed a 90% survival rate.  The average drop was 5.5 floors. 

Injuries increased with increasing heights up to 7 floors. When cats fell from over 7 floors, they actually suffered from “less injuries.” 

1.  What's happening here?
2.  What determines the rate at which something falls?

 

Today:

Homework: If you want to bring in any extra materials for rocket construction, round them up and bring them to class on Tuesday.

Class 1: Wednesday, 8/25/21

Physics 100: Mr. Stapleton

Warm Up:

1.  Suppose you're absolutely still.  What do you need to do in order move your body to another location?

2.  Suppose a spaceship is floating in space, absolutely still.  What does it need to do in to another location?

Today:

Homework: None