Class 41: Wednesday, 1/19/22

Warm Up:   The spearfisher in the picture is trying to spear a fish.  When the spearfisher looks into the water, the fish appears to be in the location shown in the picture.  But the fish really isn't there. 

1. Draw a dotted line from the fish's eye to the spearfisher's eye.  This represents the apparent path of a ray of light.

2. Accounting for refraction of the light ray, draw a realistic path of the ray of light between the fish's eye and the spearfisher's eye. 

3. Sketch the actual position of the fish.

4. If you're trying to spear a fish that you see in the water, where should you aim?

 

Today:

  • Lesson Starter Quiz -- Due within 4  minutes after class starts.
    • Discuss answers
    • Talk about next class' quiz.
  • Refraction and Reflection Practice with ray boxes
    • Finish it
    • Go over the answers
  • Finish #14-19 of the refraction notes.  Do more if we have time.

Homework:  

Class 41: Wednesday, 1/19/22

Warm Up:  

1. In the diagram, an "incident ray" of light hits the surface of some water.  Identify...

a) The "normal"

b) The angle of incidence

c) The angle of reflection

d) The angle of refraction

 

2. Clarify what will be on the quiz next class.

 

Today:

  1. New Policies:
    • Lesson Starter Quiz
      • When you enter the classroom, you will find a stack of short and simple quizzes on the front table.  You will have until four minutes after the bell to complete and turn in your quiz. 
      • At four minutes after the bell, I will share the answers to the quiz.
      • If your quiz is not submitted on time, you can take the quiz during FLEX.  It will be your responsibility to have your advisor sign you up.
      • If you miss the quiz for a legitimate reason, make sure that you enter class with an "excused" blue slip.  This will be your proof.
      • I will provide the answers to the next day's quiz questions at some point during class.  It's likely that I will provide those answers along with the warm-up.
    • Masks
      • You must wear a mask in a way that covers your nose and mouth at all times in this classroom except...
        • When you are actively chewing or swallowing food or drink (or within 5 seconds of beginning or ending such an activity).
        • When you take off your mask for quick (under 5 seconds) adjustments.  No two such time periods can occur in the same minute.
      • Starting on Friday, for the first two weeks of this semester (last day = 1/27) you will get one "free" warning per class. [If you need to engineer a mask solution, figure it out before next class.]
      • After your warning, or after the first two weeks of the semester, you will be sent to the main office, and I will dial zero to let the office know that you are on the way.
      • [Note that I reserve the right to change these policies.  If that happens I will notify you in advance.  I may add an extra period of one "free" warning per week.]
  2. Look over exams.  Then return.
  3. Notes -- Reflection and Refraction ("Wave behaviors," p.2 through #18 on page 6). Handout  Filled in notes
  4. Lab -- Refraction and Reflection Practice with ray boxes

Homework:  

  • Be ready for your lesson starter quiz on Friday, before 8:04.
Class 40: Friday, 1/7/22

Warm Up:   **For this to make sense, I need to tell you something very strange and special about light...

Fred is conducting a laser experiment on a very, very, very fast train.  He attaches a mirror to the roof of the train car and shines a quick pulse of laser light directly upward at the mirror.  Hank is standing still outside the train.  The train car is made of glass, so Hank can see the whole thing.

The pulse of laser light goes up, reflects off of the mirror, and then goes back down to the floor.  There's enough dust in the air to make the laser pulse visible.

1)  If Fred and Hank were to draw the laser pulse's "flight path" (as each of them sees it), what would each of them draw?

2)  Who would see light travel a greater distance?

3)  Assuming that the speed of the laser light is the same for both observers, who sees it travel for the longest amount of time?

4) Guess how many tardies have been recorded in A1/2 during the first 39 classes?

 

Today:

  1. Disassemble guitars -- after you've turned in your project slideshow
  2. Calculating potential impact on your grade.  There will be no retakes of the midterm.
  3. Last minute check-in regarding the midterm. 
    • When is your exam?
    • How long are exams?  Can you leave early?
    • What should you bring to exams?
  4. A1/2 Heads-up regarding next semester -- arriving on time, in particular
  5. Check on missing assignments
    • Guitar project
    • other?

Homework:  

  • Study, prepare a notecard
Class 39: Wednesday, 1/5/22

Warm Up:   Suppose you have a shirt that says "shirt" on the front.  When you look at your shirt in a mirror, which of these do you see?  Why don't you see the other one?  In other words, why do mirrors seem to "flip" images one way, but not the other?  What's going on? Here's a hint...

Today:

  • Check midterm practice
  • Hand out notecards.  You may write notes to use on the test.  You may use both sides of a 3"x5" notecard.  These notes must be handwritten by you.  You may write or draw anything that you think will be helpful.  You may not use someone else's note card.
  • If you choose not to use a notecard, I will add 2% to your exam grade.
  • Discuss what would be most useful on a notecard. 

Homework:  

  • Study, prepare a notecard.
Class 38: Monday, 1/3/22

Warm Up:

The diagram below shows top views of the same boy looking into mirrors.  On the right, the mirror is a simple flat mirror.  On the left, the mirror is two separate mirrors arranged at right angles.  The boy has one blue eye and one green eye.

When he looks in the mirrors, where will his blue eye appear to be?  Why?

Today:

  • Return project grading sheets
  • Submit or Revise Electric Guitar Projects
  • Finish midterm practice (due on Wednesday)

Homework:  

  • Midterm practice
Class 37: Tuesday, 12/21/21

Warm Up:  

1.  Explain how this dad turns this pool into a "volcano."

2.  Is the Tacoma Narrows Bridge collapse an example of resonance?

 

Today:

Homework:  

  • Get some rest!
Class 36: Friday, 12/17/21

Warm Up:   How do people break glass with their voices? 

 

Today:

Homework:  

  • Make sure that you're going to finish the project.  It's due on Tuesday.
Class 35: Wednesday, 12/15/21

Warm Up:  

1. If you're standing next to a race track, what do you hear as the cars pass you?

a.  Their pitch changes from high to low.

b.  Their pitch changes from low to high.

c.  There is no change in pitch.

2.  Why?

3.  What causes sonic booms?

Doppler Simulation  Supersonic Flight Video

Today:

  • Please complete this form.  We have talked about one of the questions, but not the other.  Just take your best guess.
  • Return Quizzes -- retake opportunity on Friday.
  • Guitar Project work:

Homework:  

  • If you're taking the quiz retake on Friday, study.  Make sure that you can do everything in this video.
Class 34: Monday, 12/13/21

Warm Up:  Video Explanation (my answers to these questions)

1. Explain how movement of the guitar string is turned into sound waves coming out of the speaker.

2. Why is it neccesary to amplify the sound?  Why isn't the string loud enough by itself?

Today:

  • Quiz
  • Finish the guitars
    1. Assemble and confirm that they work
    2. Mark the frets (so that each fret has a frequency 1.0595 times higher than the one before) -- Get help from Mr. Stapleton. 
    3. Get confirmation that your fret marks are correct (have Mr. Stapleton check), and then make nice, dark marks with a Sharpie.
    4. Label the fret marks with note numbers for a major key.  Do this with pencil first.  Get your numbers verified.  Then use a Sharpie.  Do this on the side of the neck "above" the string, when the nut is on your left and the saddle is on your right.  Write "Major" somewhere in this area, near the nut. 
    5. Both classes -- label the fret marks with their minor key numbers.  Do this on the other side of the string, opposite the major key numbers.
  • Guitar Project work:

Homework:  

  • None, unless you need to study to retake the quiz at some point.
Image result for lightning strike house hillClass 33: Tuesday, 12/7/21

Warm Up:  If you see lightning strike a point 1 mile away, how long can you expect to wait before you hear thunder?  Why?

 

Today:

  • Return the practice quizzes.  Go over the answers and make a video explaining the solutions.  Next class there will be a real quiz with the same kinds of questions.
  • Finish the guitars
    1. Assemble and confirm that they work
    2. Mark the frets (so that each fret has a frequency 1.0595 times higher than the one before) -- Get help from Mr. Stapleton. 
    3. Get confirmation that your fret marks are correct (have Mr. Stapleton check), and then make nice, dark marks with a Sharpie.
    4. Label the fret marks with note numbers for a major key.  Do this with pencil first.  Get your numbers verified.  Then use a Sharpie.  Do this on the side of the neck "above" the string, when the nut is on your left and the saddle is on your right.  Write "Major" somewhere in this area, near the nut. 
    5. A3/4 only -- Label the fret marks with their minor key numbers.  Do this on the other side of the string, opposite the major key numbers.
  • Make a song video
    1. Find a song to play.  You will get extra points if you play a song that is not on my list.  But it has to be recognizable, correct, and more difficult than something like "Hot Cross Buns."
    2. Determine whether your song is in a major key or a minor key.  Play the song using the correct group of notes on your guitar.  Keep in mind that there may be a few "accidentals" -- notes that aren't in the same key as the rest of the song.
    3. Figure out what key your're playing in.  If you're using the numbered notes, the key name is the same as the note for your open string.  You can find that note by using a tuner, like this online option.  If you're interested, here's the song sheet (note number notation) from 2014.

Homework:  

  • Study for the quiz next class.  It will have the same types of questions as the practice quiz.
Class 33: Tuesday, 12/7/21

Warm Up:  Remember that ordinary air pressure is about 14.7psi...

1.  What does "psi" mean?

2.  According to the table below, the "sound amplitude" of a .30-06 rifle fired at a distance of 1m is about 1psi.  What is the air pressure (in psi) in one of the sound wave's compressions?  What is the air pressure  in one of the sound wave's rarefactions?

3.  According to the table, there is a limit to how loud an undistorted sound can be.  Why can't sounds keep getting louder and louder forever?

 

Source of sound (in air) Sound Pressure -- amplitude
(psi) 
Volume in Decibels, calculated by
20*LogP/Po
Po (threshold of hearing, in psi) Loudest Pressure divided by Quietest Audible Pressure
Shockwave (distorted sound waves > 1 atm; waveform valleys are clipped at zero pressure) 14.69543147 194.0956869 2.9E-09 5,067,390,163
Theoretical limit for undistorted sound at 1 atmosphere environmental pressure 14.69543147 194.0956869    
Stun grenades 2.900652647 180.0019545    
Simple open-ended thermoacoustic device[6] 1.830166788 176.0018534    
.30-06 rifle being fired 1 m to shooter's side 1.053662074 171.206067    
M1 Garand rifle being fired at 1 m 0.728498912 168.0006182    
Rocket launch equipment acoustic tests 0.580130529 166.0225545    
Jet engine at 30 m 0.091660624 149.9956962    
Threshold of pain 0.009166062 129.9956962    
Vuvuzela horn at 1 m 0.002900653 120.0019545    
Hearing damage (possible) 0.002900653 120.0019545    
Jet engine at 100 m 0.029006526 140.0019545    
Non-electric chainsaw at 1 m 0.000913706 109.9681656    
Jack hammer at 1 m 0.000290065 100.0019545    
Traffic on a busy roadway at 10 m 9.15156E-05 89.98194182    
Hearing damage (over long-term exposure, need not be continuous) 5.16316E-05 85.01035459    
Passenger car at 10 m 2.90065E-05 80.00195455    
EPA-identified maximum to protect against hearing loss and other disruptive effects from noise, such as sleep disturbance, stress, learning detriment, etc.   #NUM!    
Handheld electric mixer 5.51124E-06 65.57702656 Classroom Unit Ventilator  
TV (set at home level) at 1 m 2.90065E-06 60.00195455    
Normal conversation at 1 m 2.90065E-06 60.00195455    
Very calm room 9.19507E-08 30.02313979    
Light leaf rustling, calm breathing 9.16606E-09 9.995696197    
Auditory threshold at 1 kHz 2.90065E-09 0.001954545    

 

Today:

Homework:  

  • None
Class 32: Friday, 12/3/21

Warm Up:  What does this picture have to do with waves and guitars?

 

Today:

  • Check/review the homework.
  • Finish the notes on standing waves and harmonics
  • Finish the guitars.

Homework:  

Class 31: Wednesday, 12/1/21

Warm Up:   What is a wave?  What is a sound?  How do ears work?

Khan Academy Sound Waves 

Today:

Homework:  

  • Complete #17-21, and #23 on pages 9-10 of the packet.
Class 30: Monday, 11/29/21

Warm Up:  

What's happening in the "Amazing Water and Sound Experiment?"

Today:

Homework:  

Class 29: Thursday, 11/18/21

Warm Up:   What can you play on a one string guitar?

Today:

Homework:  

  • None
Class 28: Tuesday, 11/16/21

Warm Up:   How do guitarmakers determine the spacing of the frets on a guitar?

Today:

  • Quiz
  • Finish your pickup.
  • Begin constructing your guitar.  Electric Guitar Instructions When it's constructed, "tune" it by making fret marks.  Use a tuner like this one to make pencil marks one musical tone apart (e.g. A, A#, G, G#...)

Homework:  

  • If you want to retake the quiz next class, study.
Class 27: Friday, 11/12/21

Warm Up:   How is an electric generator like an electric motor?

Today:

  • Check out the quizlet
  • Learn how to solder.  Before you make your pickup, show me that you can solder a magnet wire to a stranded wire -- and get continuity.
  • Make magnetic pickups -- a type of electric generator.  Here's a link to the instruction page.

Homework:  

  • Study the quizlet.  We will have a brief quiz over this on Tuesday.
Class 26: Wednesday, 11/10/21

Warm Up:   How does this electric motor work?  Can it be improved?

Today:

  • Return and disassemble remaining wiring projects.  Return parts for re-use (and the last two points on the project).
  • Continue project work.  Next class we will probably begin working on magnetic pickups (a kind of generator), so see finish up what you can today.

Homework:  

  • None
Class 25: Monday, 11/8/21

Warm Up:   Your team must make a video that clearly showing your buzzer all of its parts -- and features you (your voice and "fingers," at least) explaining how it works.  What do you think is the easiest way to make and turn in this video?

Today:

  • Return and disassemble remaining wiring projects.  Return parts for re-use (and the last two points on the project).
  • Work on the Solenoid Buzzer Project
  • If you're done with the solenoid buzzer, submit it.  Then return all of your materials (wire goes on cardboard, clearly labeled with "10m of 28 gauge magnet wire."  Then begin the motor or speaker project.

Homework:  

  • None
Class 24: Thursday, 11/4/21

Warm Up:  

1.  Is there anything wrong with the diagram on the right?

2.  Why is the north pole of a magnet called the "north" pole?

 

Today:

  • Return and disassemble wiring projects.  Return parts for re-use (and the last two points on the project).
  • If your wiring project is not finished, simply draw the rest of the wires, LEDs, etc.  Then label everything as if the wiring and LEDs were real -- and as if they worked.  Then turn in your project.
  • Magnetism Notes PDF  Filled-in notes  Video of notes during class
  • Solenoid Buzzer Project

Homework:  

  • None
Class 23: Tuesday, 11/2/21

Warm Up:   How does this solenoid-powered buzzer work?

Today:

  • Discuss the upcoming units and projects...
    • Electricity & Magnetism Projects:  Complete at least two of the following projects.   One project must be the magnetic pickup, because we will use that in the next unit to make an electric guitar.  For each project, you must make a short explanatory video explaining how your object works. You can work on these projects alone or in pairs.
      • Choice Projects (complete at least 1)
        1. Solenoid Buzzer:  Watch this instructional video showing how to make a Solenoid Buzzer.  Draw a sketch of a solenoid buzzer design that uses only the materials below:
          •  wood, nails, hot glue/glue guns, drill/drill bits, sheet metal screws, enameled wire (10m of 28 gauge), sandpaper (and belt sander), saw (not really necessary), strips of springy magnetizable steel (approx 0.5" wide, 3" long), and a D.C. power source (set betwen 3V and 6V). 
          • With those materials, you will have to make a working solenoid buzzer, as shown in the video.
        2. Motor
        3. Speaker (a form of simple motor)
      • Required Project:  Magnetic Pickup (a form of generator)
    • Waves project -- make a single string electric guitar (a.k.a. the electric "Diddleybow")

Homework:  

  • None
Class 22: Friday, 10/29/21

Warm Up:   None -- try to wrap up the project today

Today:

  • Finish the Wiring Project
  • Return some old quizzes
  • If you finish the wiring project, start E&M (electricity and magnetism) project #1 -- build a solenoid buzzer.
    • Watch this instructional video showing how to make a Solenoid Buzzer.  Draw a sketch of a solenoid buzzer design that uses only the materials below:
      •  wood, 2 nails, hot glue/glue gun, duct tape, 10m of 28 gauge enameled magnet wire, sandpaper, sander, saw, 1 thin strip of steel steel (approx 0.5" wide, 3" long), and a D.C. power source. 
      • With those materials, you will have to make a working solenoid buzzer -- alone or in pairs. 

Homework:  

  • None
Class 21: Wednesday, 10/27/21

Warm Up:   What is a solenoid?  How does it work?

Today:

  • Work time -- finish the wiring project and turn in your model.
  • If you're done early, begin the first magnetism project...
    • Watch this instructional video showing how to make a Solenoid Buzzer.  Draw a sketch of a solenoid buzzer design that uses only the materials below:
      •  wood, nails, hot glue/glue guns, duct tape, enameled wire, sandpaper, saw, strips of magnetizable steel (approx 0.5" wide, 3" long), and a D.C. power source. 
      • With those materials, you will have to make a working solenoid buzzer -- alone or in pairs.  You may cut, glue, or tape things, but you will not be allowed to nail or drill.  Nailing and drilling are not necessary.

Homework:  

  • None
Class 20: Monday, 10/25/21

Warm Up:  

When electric current flows through an electric motor, a force is produced, causing motion. 

An electric motor forced into motion generates electric current.

I have three identical corded drills and one driver bit.  With no additional materials, how can we power two of the drills by plugging just one of them into the wall?

 

Today:

  •  Work time -- finish the project and turn in your model.
  • Next Unit -- Electricity and Magnetism

Homework:  

  • None
Class 19: Wednesday, 10/20/21

Warm Up:  

What is a Jacob's Ladder?  What is its purpose?

Today:

  •  Cabin Wiring Project Updates:
    • How to make good connections
    • How to avoid short circuits
    • Color coding with bulbs -- and why
    • What to turn in

Homework:  

  • None
Electrical-panel-fh17mar_576_06_401-1.jpg (1200×1200)Class 18: Tuesday, 10/19/21

Warm Up:   The pictures on the right show breaker panels.

1. What is the purpose of a breaker?

2. How does an electrician decide how many breakers are needed?

3.  Why are there different kinds of breakers?

Today:

Homework:  

  • None
Class 17: Friday, 10/15/21

Warm Up:  

1.  Why is the guy in the video wearing a metal suit?

2.  Why are the sparks jagged?

3.  What else do you notice the sparks doing?

Today:

  • Quiz
  • IM TC  Jagged spark Jacob's ladder?  our tc?
  • If there's time...You're going to be designing and wiring a model of a simple (but comfortable) electrically-powered cabin.  Let's brainstorm a list of basic electrical needs.

Homework:  

  • Quiz on Friday.  Study.
Class 17: Wednesday, 10/13/21

Warm Up:   Let's build the circuits on the right, and find the missing information, with the PhET DC Circuit Kit.

 

Today:

Homework:  

  • Quiz on Friday.  Study.
Class 16: Thursday, 10/07/21

Warm Up:   The purpose of a fuse is to open a circuit when the current gets too high.  How can we set up a demonstration of this with light bulbs, a power source, and a fuse?

 

Today:

Homework:  

  • None
Class 15: Tuesday, 10/05/21

Warm Up:   What can Tango and Cash teach us about electricity?

 

Today:

Homework:  

  • None
Class 14: Friday, 9/30/21

Warm Up:   The deceptively complicated case of the electrified pickle...

  Why does the pickle light up Why does it light up on just one end?  Is it always the same end?

joule heating

Electric Arc

Arc lamp

Hyperphysics electric pickle info

 

Today:

  • Return and review quizzes
  • Finish the PhET simulation

Homework:  

  • None
Class 13: Wednesday, 9/29/21

Warm Up:   How can you start a fire with a 9 Volt Battery and some steel?

  

Today:

Homework:  

  • None
Class 12: Monday, 9/27/21

Warm Up:   Can we recreate some of the experiments performed by the "brainiacs?"  Do we want to?

  

Today:

  • Review the practice quiz through #13.
  • Finish the practice quiz and discuss the answers.  Practice Quiz answers  Talk about Wednesday's quiz.  Maybe do some verbal quizzing.
  • The new unit -- Electric Current and Circuits
  • Look at a D.C. circuit -- pHet simulation?

Online Textbook Links:   Chapter 19, Introduction to Electrical Circuits

Homework:  

  • Study for quiz next class
Class 11: Thursday, 9/23/21

Warm Up:   There is a "pith ball" hanging next to the Van de Graaff generator.  The pith ball is foam that is covered with a conductive, metallic paint.  What do you think will happen when the Vand de Graaff generator is turned on?  Why?

  

Today:

Online Textbook Links:

 

Homework:  

  • Complete 1-13 on the practice quiz  PDF
Class 10: Tuesday, 9/21/21

Warm Up:   Which of the following can we say with certainty?  Why?

A)  The balloons have the same net charge

B)  The cat and the foam "peanuts" have opposite net charges.

C)  Both A and B are correct.

D)  None of these answers is (are) correct.

  Today:

 

Homework:  

  • None
Class 9: Friday, 9/15/21

Warm Up:  

How does a Van de Graaff Generator Work?

  Today:

Homework:  

  • None, unless you would like to retake your quiz.  If you want to do a retake, study the Quizlets.
Class 8: Wednesday, 9/13/21

Warm Up:  

1.  If you rub a balloon on your head and then hold it next to your hair, your hair is attracted to the balloon.  Why?

2.  Your hair may also stand on end after being rubbed by a balloon.  Why?

3.  The balloon may stick to the wall or ceiling.  Why?

4.  This all works better in drier air.  Why?

5.  What events contributed to this gas station fire?

  Today:

Homework:  

  • None
Class 7: Monday, 9/13/21

Warm Up:   None -- change of plans due to weather forecast

  Today:

  • Rocket rebuild, launch, and maybe find time aloft.
  • We're not measuring burnout velocity, so you don't need to measure your rocket's height.
  • Quiz on Wednesday, instead of today.
  • Remember to mark the quizlet complete when you've finished it.

Homework:  

  • None
Class 6: Thursday, 9/9/21

Warm Up:  

1.  Which do you think lasts longer, the flight up or the flight down?

2.  Why does adding weight to a rocket make it go higher?

 Today:

  • Take a look at some sensor data.
  • Complete the Rocket Analysis
  • Make a decision -- Do we want to rebuild and launch one more time, or do we want to go ahead and start on electricity?

Homework:  

  • There are two quizlet assignments in Google Classroom.  Study both quizlets.  You should study them until you know the information, but when you've studied each one at least once, you can mark each assignment complete.
  • There will be a simple quiz next class.  The quiz will have the same questions as the quizlets,  plus you will have to measure a line in appropriate metric units of your choice.  If you don't do well on the quiz, you can have another try.
Class 5: Tuesday, 9/7/21

Warm Up:  Video Practice -- If you have a phone, take it out and get a video of this object that I am about to launch in the room.  Keeping your camera still the whole time, video with the highest frame rate (slowest motion) that your phone will allow.  Try to capture the entire flight.

Today:

  • Finish assembly and measure rockets.
    • Make sure that there's ventilation in the probe area.
    • Add "rocket length" to your rocket data sheet.
    • Fill out your data sheet and turn it in.
  • Launch rockets
    • Video your rocket with a phone.  Record the entire flight in slow motion.  We have a Samsung Galaxy that you can use.
    • Measure altitude with the Pocketlab Voyager sensor.
  • Return to the classroom.  If there's time...
    • Download the data from the Pocketlab Voyager sensors.
    • Upload your video to your Google Drive

Homework: None.

Class 4: Thursday, 9/2/21

Warm Up:

1.  Why can't we "see our breath" right now?

2.  When we do see our breath, what are we actually seeing?

3.  I made a video showing how I can make my breath visible at will.  Can you tell how I did it?

Today:

Homework: None.  Be ready to launch your rocket on Tuesday!

Class 3: Tuesday, 8/31/21

Warm Up:

The air around us is pressurized to about 14.7psi.

1.  What does 14.7psi mean?

2.  What evidence is there that there is air pressure around us?

3.  We are going to measure the heights of your rocket flights using a pressure sensor.  How will a pressure sensor tell the height of the rocket?

 

Today:

  • Take attendance
  • Student info sheet -- A3/4 Only
  • Water Rocket Design:
    • Provided materials -- 1 meter of duct tape, Two 2-liter bottles, DVDs, Hot Glue
    • **New requirement: your rocket must incorporate a chamber for storing an air pressure sensor.  The
    • Get bottles and decide which one you will use for a pressure chamber (fuselage).  Don't cut into this bottle!
    • Use Clifford Heath's Water Rocket Simulation to plan your design.  Record your data and draw your design on this Rocket Design sheet. PDF Version
      • Use the digital calipers to measure the nozzle diameter (same as the launcher plug diameter, which is easier to measure).
      • Find the pressure chamber bottle diameter (using the big calipers)
      • Use the Clifford Heath's simulation to determine the best combination of water and dry mass.  Write down the best volume of water and the best dry mass.
      • Measure the mass of your pressure chamber bottle.  Subtract it from your dry mass to figure out how much mass your fins, tape, and other additions should have.
      • **Make a sketch of rocket design.  On the diagram, include the following:
        • Names of your group members
        • Labels for the materials that you plan to use for fins, weights, and other purposes 
        • Write down the best amount of water and the best dry mass, according to Clifford Heath's simulator.  Write: "water volume = ____" and "dry mass = ______"

Homework: None

Class 2: Friday, 8/27/21

Image result for cat falling from buildingWarm Up:

According to this article, emergency clinic records of 132 cats that jumped from windows of buildings showed a 90% survival rate.  The average drop was 5.5 floors. 

Injuries increased with increasing heights up to 7 floors. When cats fell from over 7 floors, they actually suffered from “less injuries.” 

1.  What's happening here?
2.  What determines the rate at which something falls?

 

Today:

Homework: If you want to bring in any extra materials for rocket construction, round them up and bring them to class on Tuesday.

Class 1: Wednesday, 8/25/21

Physics 100: Mr. Stapleton

Warm Up:

1.  Suppose you're absolutely still.  What do you need to do in order move your body to another location?

2.  Suppose a spaceship is floating in space, absolutely still.  What does it need to do in to another location?

Today:

Homework: None