Class 76 -- Last Class  Thursday, 6/4/15

Today:

  1. Turn in Textbooks
  2. Questions about the Final?
  3. Build Speakers
  4. Finish PowerPoint
  5. What's on the final exam -- Questions/problems will be taken from the following sources.
    1. Test Reviews:
      1. Light Practice Test
      2. Music and Waves Quiz Review
      3. Mechanical Waves Practice Test
      4. Momentum Test Review
    2. Videos corresponding to above test reviews:

Homework:   

  • Turn in you textbook next class
  • Finish your PowerPoint.  Due next Friday (June 5th). 
  • Final exam on Friday.  If you have to take it, study.  Be prepared to ask questions next class (Thursday).  Any review that we do will be student-driven.

Class 75  Tuesday, 6/2/15

Warm-Up:  No Warm-up Today

Today:

  1. Finish PowerPoint
  2. What's on the final exam -- Questions/problems will be taken from the following sources.
    1. Test Reviews:
      1. Light Practice Test
      2. Music and Waves Quiz Review
      3. Mechanical Waves Practice Test
      4. Momentum Test Review
    2. Videos corresponding to above test reviews:

Homework:   

  • Turn in you textbook next class
  • Finish your PowerPoint.  Due next Friday (June 5th). 
  • Final exam on Friday.  If you have to take it, study.  Be prepared to ask questions next class (Thursday).  Any review that we do will be student-driven.

Class 74  Friday, 5/29/15

Warm-Up:  No warm-up today.  Set up your solar cooker.

Today:

  1. Solar cooking
    1. Set up
    2. Record start time and temperature
    3. Photograph your cooker in action
    4. Heat hotdog approximately 15 minutes
    5. Record end time and temperature
    6. Back to class
  2. Complete PowerPoint -- class data available on Tuesday

Homework:   

  • Finish your PowerPoint.  Due next Friday (June 5th). 

Class 73  Wednesday, 5/27/15

Warm-Up: 

**A very strange but well-documented property of light is that, no matter how fast you move, or in what direction you move, light will always move past you at the same speed.**

Fred is conducting a laser experiment on a very, very, very fast train.  He attaches a mirror to the roof of the train car and shines a quick pulse of laser light directly upward at the mirror.  Hank is standing still outside the train.  The train car is made of glass, so Hank can see the whole thing.

The pulse of laser light goes up, reflects off of the mirror, and then goes back down to the floor.  There's enough dust in the air to make the laser pulse visible.

1)  If Fred and Hank were to draw the laser's "flight path" (as each of them sees it), what would each of them draw?

2)  Who would see light travel a greater distance?

3)  Assuming that Hank and Fred see light traveling the same speed, who sees it travel for the longest amount of time?

 

Today:

  1. Return tests
  2. Work on solar cookers -- get photo(s) for slide show

Homework:   

  • Bring stuff for solar cookout
    • sunglasses
    • food to cook
    • etc.

Class 72  Friday, 5/22/15

Warm-Up: 

How does a greenhouse work?

Today:

  1. Tests are not graded. I didn't think I would be here.
  2. Some of you are missing instrument recording grades and light quizzes.
  3. Work on solar cookers.

Upcoming Deadlines/Activities:

  • May 27th (next class) -- Solar cookers due.  2 more class work days.
  • May 29th or June 2nd, 4th, or 5th -- Solar cookout
  • June 4th or 5th -- Final Exam.  Ideally, we will have it on the 5th, but if solar cooking weather looks better on the 5th, we may have it on the 4th.  I will make a decision by June 2nd.

Homework:   

  • Bring-in solar cooker materials

Class 71  Wednesday, 5/20/15

Warm-Up: 

When you look in a mirror, things appear to be "flipped," but mirrors only seem to flip things one way. 

1.  Which shirt shows the correct flip? 

2.  Why don't mirrors flip things the other way?

Today:

  1. Light test
  2. Work on solar cookers.  Project outline.

Next Class:

  1. Mr. Stapleton gone
  2. Work on solar cookers

Upcoming Deadlines/Activities:

  • May 27th -- Solar cookers due.  2 1/2 class work days.
  • June 2nd, 4th, or 5th -- Solar cookout
  • June 4th or 5th -- Final Exam.  Ideally, we will have it on the 5th, but if solar cooking weather looks better on the 5th, we may have it on the 4th.  I will make a decision by June 2nd.

Homework:   

  • Bring-in solar cooker materials

Class 70  Monday, 5/18/15

Warm-Up:  Why do oil slicks (and sometimes soap bubbles) often have interesting patterns of color?

interference link 1

interference link 2

Today:

  1. Return ray drawing quiz. 
  2. Practice Test
  3. Review Practice
  4. Solar cooker planning time?? (see last class for details)

Homework:   

  • Study.  Test next class.

Class 69  Thursday, 5/14/15

Warm-Up: 

Look at the picture on the right.  How was it created?

more Julian Beever pictures (like the one on the right)

Today:

  1. Quiz -- ray diagrams
  2. Finish light notes
  3. Solar cooker design, part 1
    1. In pairs or alone, research solar cookers.  Using 1/2 of a reflective mylar survival blanket (54"x42"), plus other materials (up to you), raise the temperature of a hotdog as high as possible in 15 minutes using only energy from sunlight
    2. Sketch three different ideas for a solar cooker design.  Label your materials.  Briefly explain how each solar cooker works.
  4. Solar cooker design, part 2:  Choose one of your design ideas and refine it.  Make a materials list and decide who is bringing each material.  The following materials will be provided:
    1. Hot glue
    2. White glue
    3. Scissors
    4. At least one utility knife for the class to share
    5. 1/2 of an emergency blanket (approx. 42" x 54")
    6. Hot dog (on the day of competition)
    7. Other materials:  may be available upon request

Homework:   

  • Practice test next class:  review your notes.

Class 68  Tuesday, 5/12/15

Warm-Up: 

Which parts of these mirrors are concave?  Which parts are convex?

Today:

  1. Discuss grades
  2. Return quizzes
  3. Lenses and Mirrors.  Ray diagrams.
  4. Begin solar cooker project
    1. In pairs or alone, research solar cookers.  Using 1/2 of a reflective mylar survival blanket (54"x42"), plus other materials (up to you), raise the temperature of a hotdog as high as possible in 15 minutes using only energy from sunlight
    2. Sketch three different ideas for a solar cooker design.  Label your materials.  Briefly explain how each solar cooker works.

Homework:   

  • Drawing practice.  Re-create all of the ray drawings from your notes.  Quiz next class over "lenses, mirrors and ray diagrams" notes #3-13."

Class 67  Thursday, 5/7/15

Warm-Up: 

4.  What is the connection between these pictures and refraction?

Today:

  1. Roy G. Biv song
  2. Return insrument recording grade sheets.  Photograph instruments. 
  3. Quiz
  4. Lenses and Mirrors.  Outdoors experimentation.
  5. Lenses and Mirrors.  Ray diagrams.

Homework:   

  • None

Class 66  Tuesday, 5/5/15

Warm-Up: 

  1. Have you ever noticed that there are RGB and CMYK color systems?
  2. In what applications are the two systems used?
  3. How do they each work?

Today:

  1. Return insrument recording grade sheets.  Who is mising stuff...
    1. Master recording
    2. Completed Pickup
    3. Photo of instrument
    4. Does anyone want/need to work in this room during AST?
  2. Optics.  Light Notes (an older version)  Filled-in version from last year
    1. Introductory notes
    2. Inquiry (see if you can figure out the rules for refraction and reflection) -- Refraction and Reflection Practice
    3. Wrap up notes on refraction.

Homework:   

  • Quiz next class over light notes.
    • Identify wave behaviors:  reflection, refraction, scattering
    •  Be able to correctly draw refracting rays of light.  Anticipate how light will bend.
    • Explain why light refracts.
    • Identify colors that refract most

Class 65  Friday, 5/1/15

Warm-Up: 

The diagram below shows top views of the same boy looking into mirrors.  On the right, the mirror is a simple flat mirror.  On the left, the mirror is two separate mirrors arranged at right angles.  The boy has one blue eye and one green eye.

1) When he looks in the mirrors, where will his blue eye appear to be?

Today:

  1. Finish your pickup
  2. Attach your pickup to your instrument
  3. Optional
    1. Attach a female audio connector to your pickup
    2. Attach a male audio connector to your pickup
  4. Get your instrument photographed
  5. Make sure that you have turned in your master recording.

Homework:   

  • Master recording is due on Friday.  On Friday, we will be working on optics.  If you need additional time to finish your project, you will need to complete it outside of class.  If you don't have one, you can check out a microphone from the AV room in the library.  You can borrow an audio plug from me.

Class 64  Wednesday, 4/29/15

Warm-Up:  Making pickups today.  No warm-up.

Today:

  1. How to check for continuity
  2. How to prepare audio connectors
  3. Wind and solder pickups.
    1. If you haven't already watched it, watch the video.
    2. Create your spool.
    3. Use a drill to wind your pickup
    4. Solder a thick wire to the thin wire.
    5. Check for continuity and/or test using amplifier
    6. Secure everything with hot glue
    7. Optional for some: 
      1. solder female 1/8" audio connector to your wires  or
      2. Connect a 1/8" plug to your wires.
  4. Attach your pickup to your instrument
  5. Get your instrument photographed

Homework:   

  • Master recording is due on Friday.  On Friday, we will be working on optics.  If you need additional time to finish your project, you will need to complete it outside of class.  If you don't have one, you can check out a microphone from the AV room in the library.  You can borrow an audio plug from me.

Class 63  Monday, 4/27/15

Warm-Up: 

Today:

  1. Design pickups or work on recordings.  100% for a functioning pickup with an ornamental design.  90% for a functioning pickup without the design.  Email your completed .3dm file to Mr. Stapleton.
  2. Pickup Design Video  How to wind and solder the pickup

Homework:   

Class 62  Thursday, 4/16/15

Warm-Up: 

Suppose you want to compose a simple song. 

1.  If you want your song to sound bright and happy, should you use a major key or a minor key?

2.  On what note should you end your song?

3.  Many songs have a "bridge."  What's a bridge?

Today:

  1. How to write a simple song
  2. More minor key songs below
  3. Make your recordings.  Project Requirements and Grading  It is easiest to save one recording plus a narration at a time.  Later on, you can put everything together.

Homework:    Finish recordings today.

 

More Minor key songs -- superscripts mean the note is in the next octave up.  Subscripts mean the note is in the next octave below.

Erie Canal

5 11 33 44 5      555 123121     55 11 3333 44 5   555 123121    

57575754  5353532     5 11 33 44 5    5151 123121

Sixteen Tons

33151115 33151115    11 33 44 4#  55555431

5511313315  53331151115  51111 333 44 4#  55555431

Hotel California

 (welcome to the…) 6666667665   55544  44433   6666667665   55544   66655

(mirrors on the ceiling…) 556565   55544  54445445  55544431  

(in the master’s chambers…) 555435  35433   444444435  5555545   back to the top

Wrecking Ball

51515757    222123   51515757    222123

11175   11175  777653    11175   11175  777651 

66666655

Ice Ice Baby

5555552  55555552   5555552  55555552 

5  5751   5  3431      5  5751   5  3431

 

Another One Bites The Dust

111  111314      111  111314       554431   113331  1555554

2  22444  222425  3 111  111314    Back to beginning

Hallelujah **Major Key ** (Melody and harmony)

Melody     

Harmony  1 7    6       7   1   7  6         5   4    6   5   7  1 7    6       7 

 

Melody     3555 5666    3555 5666    66666655435

Harmony  1   7      6        7     1   7      6           5     4      6     5     7    1 7    6       7 

 

Melody    3555 5667  7111 6112  2222 2333221  

Harmony      1      4  5    6   4 5    5      1  5 6

 

Melody  3566  6533  3566  653 432 321

 Harmony     4      1         4       1       5     1

 

Melody     

Harmony  7    6       7   1   7    6       7   1 

 

Class 61  Tuesday, 4/14/15

Warm-Up: 

1. There are 8 pennies lying on a table (as shown in the diagram).  By moving only one of them, how can you organize them into two strips of 5?

2.  What runs fore to aft on one side of a ship and aft to fore on the other side?

Today:

  1. Doppler Practice
  2. Minimize your noisy activities, so that people can hear their instruments
  3. Make your recordings.  Project Requirements and Grading  It is easiest to save one recording plus a narration at a time.  Later on, you can put everything together.

Homework:  Recordings should be finished by the end of next class

Class 60

Monday, 4/6/15 and Wednesday, 4/8/15

Warm-Up: 

  1. How can you add narration to your Audacity file?
  2. How can you organize multple tracks in Audacity?

Today:

  1. Minimize your noisy activities, so that people can hear their instruments
  2. Prepare your instrument for recording.
    1. Temporarily add a pickup and cord
    2. It will help to add some note numbers (1-7) for your major and minor key notes.  If your bridge and peg box are set up correctly, you can create your own elastic strips.
  3. Make your recordings.  It is easiest to save one recording plus a narration at a time.  Later on, you can put everything together.

Audacity Help:

  1. Adding Narration
    1. Click the edit tab.  Choose preferences.  Select recording.  Turn off overdubbing.
    2. In the main window, switch input channels to mono.
    3. Plug in your instrument and make your recording.  Use the change pitch effect to learn about your notes' names and frequencies.
    4. Unplug your instrument and plug in the headphones.  Record your narration.
    5. On the left side of the screen, click the part of your narration's box that says "audio track."  Then select move track up. 
    6. Select both tracks by clicking on the top one and dragging downward to the bottom one.
    7. Click the tracks tab.  Click the align tracks tab.   Click end to end.  If the tracks don't start at time zero, select them again and align them the same way, but use the start to zero command.
    8. Listen to your file.  Then export it to a safe location as a .wav file.

Homework:  

Class 59 

Monday, 4/6/15 and Wednesday, 4/8/15

Warm-Up: 

  1. You're standing next to a highway.  As a car passes you, the frequency of its engine noise drops 3 half-steps, from a G (196Hz) to an E (164.81Hz).  What is the car's speed?
  2. In order for these calculations to be valid, what velocities must the car have?
  3. For what range of speeds will this method work?

Today:

  1. Introduction to Doppler Effect -- complete worksheet during next class
  2. Project Grading
  3. How to create recordings
  4. Begin creating project recordings
    1. Mark your frets (sticky labels or elastic)
    2. Temporarily add a pickup
    3. Create recordings in Audacity
  5. Materials for making your own pickups have not yet arrived.  You will have an opportunity to create your own pickup and give your instrument a finished look.

Links:

Homework:  

Class 58  Thursday, 4/2/15

Warm-Up: 

Some fireplaces and wood stoves have blowers.  When the blower operates at the resonant frequency of some part of the fireplace, the stove rattles or buzzes.  As a stove heats up, it often buzzes for a while and then stops.  The buzzing may start and stop several times over the course of a day.  If the blower always operates at the same rpm, why does the buzzing start and stop?

 

Today:

  1. Determine the spacing of your frets. 
  2. Make and/or add your frets.
  3. Mark notes or prepare elastic.
  4. Find a way to temporarily attach a pickup -- so that you can easily remove it and share it with others.
  5. Clean up:
    1. Drills -- wind cords and place on file cabinet
    2. Hot glue guns -- leave plugged in on plastic table
    3. Other hand tools to middle table
    4. Hardware (bolts, strings, nuts, etc) to middle table
    5. Wood scraps to cardboard box
    6. Pickups -- counter behind Mr. Stapleton's computer

Instruments must be playable by next class.  If you don't have raised frets by then, you will have to use non-raised fret marks.

Links:

Homework:  

Class 57  Tuesday, 3/31/15

Warm-Up: 

1.  There are three misteaks in thi sentence.  Can you find them?

2.  What five letter word do almost all educated people pronounce wrong?

3.  Mary digs up an ancient looking coin that is dated 218 BC.  How does she know that it's obviously a fake?

 

Today:

  1. Cleaning needs:
    1. Returning tools -- where do they go?
    2. Returning wood and other parts
    3. Pickups
    4. THE SANDER -- how to minimize dust and danger
      1. dust
      2. danger
      3. hot glue
  2. Space frets for your fret board.  Methods...
    1. Measure and drill
    2. Rhino paper template
    3. Laser cut
  3. Add your frets.
  4. Mark notes or prepare elastic.

Links:

Homework:   If you need materials for your string instrument (e.g. box, cookie tin, corrugated pipe, etc.) bring your stuff to our next class.

Class 56  Friday, 3/27/15

Warm-Up:  Can you think of a way to make good raised frets?

 

 

Today:

  1. How to space frets for your fret board
    1. Measure and drill
    2. Rhino paper template
    3. Laser cut
  2. How to make frets

Links:

Homework:   If you need materials for your string instrument (e.g. box, cookie tin, corrugated pipe, etc.) bring your stuff to our next class.

Class 55  Wednesday, 3/25/15

Warm-Up: 

1.  Why does adding a hollow body to a string instrument make it louder?

2.  Where on the instrument should the bridge be placed?

Today:

  1. Return Quiz
  2. Show sketches to Mr. Stapleton -- include a space for a pickup
  3. Begin work on instruments
    1. Assemble laser cut parts
    2. Get a string
    3. Assemble your instrument so that your string will be long enough
    4. Attach your string
    5. Measure your open string frequency
    6. Use your spreadsheet to determine your fret spacing
    7. Make raised frets or draw lines for fret marks

Links:

Homework:   If you need materials for your string instrument (e.g. box, cookie tin, corrugated pipe, etc.) bring your stuff to our next class.

Class 54  Monday, 3/23/05

Warm-Up:  The pictures below show some homemade magnetic pickups.  If you were to design your own magnetic pickup, what would it look like?
Image result for homemade magnetic pickupImage result for homemade magnetic pickupImage result for homemade magnetic pickup

Today:

  1. Quiz
  2. Check on homework -- did you finish and submit your spreadsheet?
  3. Design instruments
    1. Today:
      1. Familiarization with modular parts and Rhino
      2. Create sketches
    2. Next Class: Start building
    3. Future Classes:
      1. Add personalization?
      2. Consider designing housings for pickups -- to be 3-D printed on the library Ultimaker-2.
      3. Mark fret boards

Links:

Homework:   If you need materials for your string instrument (e.g. box, cookie tin, corrugated pipe, etc.) bring your stuff to our next class.

Class 53  Thursday, 3/19/05

Warm-Up: What was the loudest noise ever?

Today:

  1. Practice Quiz
    1. Notes that are covered on quiz
      1. Physics and Music, Part 1
      2. Physics and Music, Part 2
  2. Finish the spreadsheet.
  3. Design instruments.
    1. 2x4 or laser-cut plywood?
    2. Suggest alterations
    3. Personalize your instrument, using Rhino

Links:

Homework:  Quiz next class -- similar to today's practice quiz

Class 53  Tuesday, 3/17/05

Warm-Up: 

1.  Why do you think the fret spacing on guitar fingerboard gets smaller as you move from the nut to the bridge?

2.  Which open string do you think has the highest frequency?  Why?

Today:

  1. Check homework
  2. Finish recordings from last class.
  3. Waves and Music, Part 2
  4. Create your own Google spreadsheet that works like this one.  You enter values into the yellow cells, and the rest of the cells are populated by formulas.  Share your spreadsheet with Mr. Stapleton.

Links:

Homework:  

Class 52  Friday, 3/13/05

Warm-Up: 
1.  If the patterns of whole steps and half steps for major and minor scales each include 7 letters (WWHWWWH and WHWWHWW), why does an octave have 8 tones?
2.  What is the real shape of the standing wave in a plucked string? 
3.  When music experts talk about the pitch of a vibrating string, they talk about "fundamental" frequency and "harmonics."  What do these terms mean? 
How can you hear them on a string instrument?

Today:

  1. Check homework
  2. Finish recordings from last class.
  3. String Instrument Scale Recordings in Audacity:
    1. Create recordings of major and minor scales.  Use one of the diddley bows from last year to record two different minor and major one octave scales.  If you're working at the same computer with a partner, you must each play different scales.
    2. You may need to enable the microphone jack.
    3. Record your scales using Audacity.  Make sure that your scale has 8-notes.
    4. Use the change pitch effect (under the effects) tab to determine the note name of the tonic (starting note).
    5. Export your recordings as .wav files and email them to Mr. Stapleton. 
      1. If you're working with a partner, send one e-mail with all of the files attached.  File names should indicate names and scales.  For example:
        1. Fred B Major.wav
        2. Fred B Minor.wav
        3. Stephanie G Major.wav
        4. Stephanie G Minor.wav
  4. Waves and Music, Part 2

Links:

Homework:  None

Class 52  Wednesday, 3/11/05

Warm-Up: 

1.  Approximately how long is the vibrating string on the right?

2. How many nodes and antinodes are present?

3.  What's the wavelength of the standing wave in the vibrating string?

Today:

  1. Return Test
  2. Check homework
  3. Finish Waves and Music, Part 1
  4. Practice Using Audacity:
    1.  You may need to take notes on this process.
    2. Create recordings of major and minor scales.  Use the virtual piano to create 2 recordings of  one of these scales (1 major scale + 1 minor scale = 2 scales):  B, D, E, F, G.  If you're working at the same computer with a partner, you must each play different scales.
    3. Record your scales using Audacity. 
    4. Export your recordings as .wav files and email them to Mr. Stapleton. 
      1. If you're working with a partner, send one e-mail with all of the files attached.  File names should indicate names and scales.  For example:
        1. Fred B Major.wav
        2. Fred B Minor.wav
        3. Stephanie G Major.wav
        4. Stephanie G Minor.wav

Links:

Homework:  

  • Complete the rest of "practice questions" at the end of waves and music notes

Class 51  Monday, 3/9/05

Warm-Up: 

1.  What's a diddley bow?

Chickenbone John plays the Electric Diddley Bow

2.  How does the bow of a string instrument create a sound?

 

Today:

Homework:  

  • Complete some of "practice questions" at the end of waves and music notes -- see a classmate for the specific numbers to complete.

Class 50  Thursday, 3/5/05

Warm-Up: 

Ordinary air pressure is about 14.7psi...

1.  Do you know what "psi" means?

2.  According to the table below, the "sound amplitude" of a .30-06 rifle fired at a distance of 1m is about 1psi.  What is the air pressure (in psi) in one of the sound wave's compressions?  What is the air pressure  in one of the sound wave's rarefactions?

3.  According to the table, there is a limit to how loud an undistorted sound can be.  Why can't sounds keep getting louder and louder forever?

 

Source of sound (in air) Sound Pressure -- amplitude
(psi) 
Volume in Decibels, calculated by
20*LogP/Po
Po (threshold of hearing, in psi) Loudest Pressure divided by Quietest Audible Pressure
Shockwave (distorted sound waves > 1 atm; waveform valleys are clipped at zero pressure) 14.69543147 194.0956869 2.9E-09 5,067,390,163
Theoretical limit for undistorted sound at 1 atmosphere environmental pressure 14.69543147 194.0956869    
Stun grenades 2.900652647 180.0019545    
Simple open-ended thermoacoustic device[6] 1.830166788 176.0018534    
.30-06 rifle being fired 1 m to shooter's side 1.053662074 171.206067    
M1 Garand rifle being fired at 1 m 0.728498912 168.0006182    
Rocket launch equipment acoustic tests 0.580130529 166.0225545    
Jet engine at 30 m 0.091660624 149.9956962    
Threshold of pain 0.009166062 129.9956962    
Vuvuzela horn at 1 m 0.002900653 120.0019545    
Hearing damage (possible) 0.002900653 120.0019545    
Jet engine at 100 m 0.029006526 140.0019545    
Non-electric chainsaw at 1 m 0.000913706 109.9681656    
Jack hammer at 1 m 0.000290065 100.0019545    
Traffic on a busy roadway at 10 m 9.15156E-05 89.98194182    
Hearing damage (over long-term exposure, need not be continuous) 5.16316E-05 85.01035459    
Passenger car at 10 m 2.90065E-05 80.00195455    
EPA-identified maximum to protect against hearing loss and other disruptive effects from noise, such as sleep disturbance, stress, learning detriment, etc.   #NUM!    
Handheld electric mixer 5.51124E-06 65.57702656 Classroom Unit Ventilator  
TV (set at home level) at 1 m 2.90065E-06 60.00195455    
Normal conversation at 1 m 2.90065E-06 60.00195455    
Very calm room 9.19507E-08 30.02313979    
Light leaf rustling, calm breathing 9.16606E-09 9.995696197    
Auditory threshold at 1 kHz 2.90065E-09 0.001954545    

Today:

Homework:  

  • Waves test next class.  Study.

Class 49  Tuesday, 3/3/05

Warm-Up: 

The people in the diagram are separated by a distance of 18 meters, and it takes the waves 3 seconds to travel from one person to the other.

1.  What is the wavelength for this series of waves?

2.  Make a rough approximation of the waves' amplitude.

3.  Calculate the waves' velocity.

4.  What is the waves' frequency?

Today:

Homework:  

Class 48  Friday, 2/20/05

Warm-Up: 

Bats have two very sensitive ears and the ability to produce prolonged series of sound waves.  By making a sound and then listening to the echo, how can a bat hear a difference between...

1.  ...an object to its left versus its right?

2.  ...distant objects versus nearby objects?

3.  ...large objects versus smaller objects?

4.  ...objects moving toward versus away from the bat?

5. You see a flash of lightning.  10 seconds later, you hear the thunder.  How far away was the lightning strike?

Today:

Homework:  None

 

Class 48  Wednesday, 2/18/05

Warm-Up: 
  1. The speed of sound in air is about 768 miles per hour.  What happens when a noisy object travels faster than the sounds it is producing? Jet link    Applet Simulation
  2. Suppose you're standing next to a highway, listening to the passing cars.  What happens to the cars' pitch as they pass by?  Do you know why?Suppose you're standing next to a highway, listening to the passing cars.  What happens to the cars' pitch as they pass by?  Do you know why? Train Cars

Today:

Homework:  None

 

Class 48  Wednesday, 2/18/05

Warm-Up: 
  1. The speed of sound in air is about 768 miles per hour.  What happens when a noisy object travels faster than the sounds it is producing?
  2. Suppose you're standing next to a highway, listening to the passing cars.  What happens to the cars' pitch as they pass by?  Do you know why?

Today:

Homework:  ?

 

Class 47  Monday, 2/16/05

Warm-Up: 
1.  An arch cannot support itself if the top pieces are missing, but a dome can.  Why?
2.  If you make a dome or arch that is a little bit wiggle or unstable, how can you use wedges to increase stability?

Today:

Homework:

Class 46  Thursday, 2/12/05

Warm-Up: 

1.  Why is an arch (like the one on the right) stable?

2.  The arrows in the second diagram represent forces of different magnitudes and directions, acting on an object.  In which direction will the object move?


3.  In the third diagram on the right, which of the two arches  is most stable?

4.  In a stable arch, what type of force plays the biggest role -- compression, tension, or bending?
forces.JPG (531×263)

5.  If you hold an egg in your palm and squeeze it, why is it so hard to crack? 

Today:

  • Quick quiz -- why are arches and domes so stable?  'They are designed so that their force vectors are directed parallel to their walls, so their walls are compressed, rather than bent. 
  • Build igloos

Homework:

  • Test on Wednesday, not Monday. 

Class 45  Tuesday, 2/10/05

Warm-Up:  

Which of the the wooden blocks on the right is (are) probably stable?  What makes it (them) stable?
Figure C shows two separate blocks.

Today:

  • Check and go over test review.  Videos explaining how to solve each type of problem are on Mr. Stapleton's YouTube channel.
  • Investigate stability of arches and igloos.
  • Prepare for igloo-building.

Homework:

  • Bring warm snow clothes to wear during next class.  You can drop them off in here ahead of time.  Put them in a bag with your name on it.
  • Test on Monday.

Class 45  Friday, 2/6/05

Warm-Up:  
1.  How does a safety helmet protect one's head? 
2.  How do aerial skiers turn in the air?
3.  Why did a guy in a "squirrel suit" crash land in a bunch of cardboard boxes?
NBC olympic videos
Squirrel suit dive into cardboard boxes

Today:

  • Check homework
  • Is the sprinkler valve faster?
  • Test Review
  • What to do next week?

Homework:

  • Finish the test review.  Test next Monday.

Class 44  Wednesday, 2/4/05

Warm-Up:  
When a projectile impacts a ballistic pendulum, the projectile embeds in the pendulum, causing the pendulum to swing (with the projectile inside it). 

1)  Is momentum conserved during the collision?
2)  Is kinetic energy conserved during the collision?
3)  Is momentum conserved after the collision (during the upward swing)?
4)  Is energy conserved after the collision (during the upward swing)?

Today:

Homework:

  • Use your data from class (pendulum mass, projectile mass, swing height) to calculate your projectile's initial velocity.  Follor the same procedure that we used on the worksheet in class.
 

Class 43  Thursday, 1/29/05

Warm-Up:  
One of the graphics on the right shows a kind of water-powered turbine called a Pelton Wheel.  The other shows how a Pelton Wheel redirects the flow of water.  Explain how this redirection of the water's flow provides a strong impulse as the water pushes the wheel.

 

Today:

  • A 3/4 and 5/6:  check and discuss homework.
  • Make Nerf® darts fly as fast as possible.  Use impulse to calculate average acceleration force and stopping force.
  • Momentum, Impulse, and Nerf® darts

Homework:

  • Complete Questions 1-9 from today's activity, but use the data below...

Data Collection :

1

What was the length of the tube, in meters?

5

2

What was the mass of your projectile, in kilograms?

0.02

3

What was the distance between your photogates, in meters?

0.5

4

How many seconds did it take your projectile to pass between the photogates? 

0.08

5

What was your projectile’s deceleration distance?  In other words, how many meters did it travel while it was being slowed down by the backstop?

0.4

Class 42 Tuesday, 1/27/15

Warm-Up: 

Suppose I stand a board on end and shoot it with a Nerf ® dart.  Am I more likely to knock the board over if I use a dart that sticks to the board or if I use a dart that bounces off of the board?

Today:

Homework:

  • A3/4, A5/6:  Read textbook section 7.1-7.3.  Answer questions 1-8, on p. 99

Class 41 Friday, 1/23/15

Warm-Up: 

1.  What will happen if I hold a tennis ball on top of a basketball and drop them to the floor together?

2.  What if I reverse their positions?

3.  Have you ever been whipped by a towel?

4.  Do you know how to maximize the effectiveness of a towel whip?

Today:

  • Review/discuss midterms
  • New semester
  • If you arrive late, make sure that your attendance is entered correctly before you leave.
  • If you have to take the final, there will be no review.  Questions will come from the 2nd semester tests and notes.  Save them.
  • Notes:  Momentum and Impulse

Homework:

  • Complete Page 4 on momentum handout.
  • A1/2:  Read textbook section 7.1-7.3.  Answer questions 1-8, on p. 99

 

Homework:  Study for exam

Class 40 Tuesday, 1/13/15

Warm-Up: 

1)  The picture on the right shows a come-along.  How does one work?  Estimate its mechanical advantage. YouTube
2) What machines do you notice in this video about sledding from a barn loft?  How do they manipulate work?

Today:

  • Final Midterm Details:
    • Don't forget that you can use a hand-written notes sheet, as long as you are the writer.  The surface area of your notes can be up to 93.5in2
    • There will be a lab portion.  Be prepared to do any or all of the following...
      • Measure time using a timer.
      • Measure distance in meters, using a meter stick.  Be able to convert cm to m.
      • Calculate velocity and/or acceleration.
      • Measure mass using a balance and convert grams to kilograms.
      • Perform other calculations based on collected data (similar to problems from review packet)
  • Check homework -- through #64 (A5/6 could skip 22-28)
  • Work on midterm review

Homework:  Study for exam

Class 39 Friday, 1/9/15

Warm-Up: 

Newton's 3rd Law says that every action has an equal and opposite reaction.  How does this law explain the steering mechanisms of a quadcopter? Specifically, how can pitch, roll, and yaw be controlled by speeding up or slowing down the various propellers?


Today:

Homework:  Complete review through #64. (A5/6 can skip22-28)

Class 38 Wednesday, 1/7/15

Today:

Homework:  

  • A1/2, A3/4:  Complete midterm review through #19
  • A5/6:  Complete midterm review through #12

 

Class 37 Monday, 1/5/15

Warm-Up: 

Mechanical Advantage = MA = Input distance/Output distance.

1.  Bob is using a winch to pull his boat onto a trailer.  Bob's hand moves in circles, and the boat moves in a straight line onto the trailer.  If Bob's boat moves 3 feet while his hand moves 15 feet, what is the mechanical advantage of his winch?
2.  Think of another machine (any type of human-powered machine) that has makes work easier by manipulating the work distance.  Estimate the mechanical advantage.

Today:

  • Empty the out box.
  • Return tests -- look in the V:drive for graded versions of your test.  Links to correct versions of the test will be provided.  Answers have been replaced with a color code.  Purple = no points for numerical answer (-1.5).  Red = 1/2 point for numerical answer (-1).  Orange = 1 point for numerical answer or incorrect units (-0.5).
  • Answers to Test Version A
  • Answers to Test Version B
  • Here's a link to me completing version A quickly.
  • Machines Activity -- Pulley Activity

Homework:  

  • Read Textbook Section 8.7 (machines) and review section 8.6.  Answer questions 14-17 on p.117.

Class 36 Thursday, 12/18/14

Warm-Up: None

Today:

  • Test in the library

Homework:  

  • Be safe.  Enjoy yourselves.

Class 35 Tuesday, 12/16/14

Warm-Up: 

Work = Fd.  Describe three ways in which machines may be used to change the nature of work without changing its magnitude.


Today:

  • Congratulations to car contest winners! (Quarter extra credit will be added at the end.  It currently shows as a comment.)
    • 1st Place:  4.9 m/s -- Stefan Kmetz
    • 2nd Place: 4.6 m/s --Jared Lee & Ethan Bartlett; Kevin Donahue & Zach Godin
    • 3rd Place: 4.3 m/s -- Justin Gilbeau, Dan Malloy
  • If you have diligently kept track of all of your car journals, staple them and turn them in today for extra points. 
  • PowerSchool has been updated.  Check your grades.
  • Test practice

Homework:  

  • Test next class.  Study/practice.

Class 34 Friday, 12/12/14

Warm-Up: 

A trucker's hitch can be used to tightly secure a load.  A trucker's hitch can be thought of as a machine.
1.  Can you tie a trucker's hitch?
2.  What is a machine?

Today:

  • Determine contest winners
  • Prepare for test
    • practice test -- check and discuss
    • Return Homework questions assigned class 31.
  • Learn to tie a trucker's hitch

Homework:  

  • Prepare for test.  Next class, students will be randomly selected to step forward and enter formulas into the practice test spreadsheet.

Class 33 Monday, 12/8/14

Warm-Up: 

Is this video for real?

Today:

Finish the Horsepower Spreadsheet
  1. Rename it with your name in the title.
  2. Enter formulas so that your spreadsheet works like the picture below.  If you enter those data into the yellow cells, the white cells should return the values shown in the picture.
  3. Once your spreadsheet is working properly, enter your data.
  4. If your car set a new speed record, enter your new max velocity in the yellow column of the class data spreadsheet.
  5. Due on Wednesday

Homework:  

  • If you didn't finish the horsepower spreadsheet, finish it.  Then share it with Mr. Stapleton in Google Docs. 
  • Practice test due on Wednesday.
  • Test Friday over problems and questions like the practice test, plus questions from the Class 31 homework.

 

Class 32 Thursday, 12/4/14

Warm-Up: 

What is power?  How is it different from energy or force?  How much power is one horsepower?  If one machine has more horsepower than another, what does that mean?  What are the standard unit of electrical power?

Today:

  1. Turn in homework
  2. Collect final car data
    • Measure your car's overall mass
    • Record a video of your car from start to finish
  3. Make a copy of this Horsepower Spreadsheet
    1. Rename it with your name in the title.
    2. Enter formulas so that your spreadsheet works like the picture below.  If you enter those data into the yellow cells, the white cells should return the values shown in the picture.
    3. Once your spreadsheet is working properly, enter your data.
    4. Due next Wednesday

Class 31 Tuesday, 12/2/14

Warm-Up: 

How does a "Newton's cradle" work?

http://www.lhup.edu/~dsimanek/scenario/cradle.htm

Today:

  1. Prepare your car for final testing -- last 30 minutes of class, on Thursday. 
    • Top 6 cars overall earn 3% extra credit added to the project grade.
    • Overall top 3 finishers earn 3%*, 2%, and 1% (respectively) added to quarter grade.
  2. On Thursday, we will collect final car data.  From these data you will determine your car's horsepower and force of rolling friction. You will need to:
    • Measure your car's overall mass
    • Record a video of your car from start to finish
    • Measure the distance your car rolls down a ramp of known height.

Homework:  Answer the questions below.  For full credit, you must fully address each of the questions and provide reasonable explanations based on concepts that we have discussed in class (e.g. torque, F=ma, W=Fd, KE ≈ Work ≈ PE, friction).  You must write or type legibly.

1.       The wheels of your car are “spinning out” at the starting line. 

a.       Describe four (or more) different ways to prevent the wheels from slipping. 

b.      Use physics concepts to explain why each solution works.  When possible, use a formula to back up your explanation.

2.       “Spinning out” is not a problem for your car, but want your car to go faster. 

a.       Describe three different changes that you might make in order to make your car go faster. 

b.      Use physics concepts to explain why each solution works.  When possible, use a formula to back up your explanation.

3.       Your car is fast enough, and its wheels do not spin out, but it pops wheelies.  This causes the car to veer out of control.  Describe the best way to prevent wheelies, and use physics to explain why that method works.

Class 30 Friday, 11/21/14

Warm-Up: 

1. What do you notice about this Blob jump picture?
2.  How did energy change form during the sequence shown on the right?

Today:

  1. Check/Review homework.
  2. Finish Torque, Work, and Energy questions and problems
  3. Here are the solutions to the homework

Homework:  None

Class 29 Wednesday, 11/19/14

Warm-Up:    PE = mgh   KE = 1/2 mv2

Consider again the bowling ball pendulum.  Suppose we raise the bowling ball  2m above its low point.  Then we let it go.  The mass of the bowling ball is 6kg. 

2.  What is the bowling ball's potential energy at its highest point?

3.  How can we measure the bowling ball's velocity at its lowest point?

4.  How can we use that velocity to determine the pendulum's efficiency (for this 1/2 swing)?

Today:

  1. Check/Review homework.
  2. Look at  car data (Physics 100 Cardboard Car Data spreadsheet.)
  3. Torque, Work, and Energy questions and problems

Homework:  

  1. Complete Torque, Work, and Energy questions and problems through #16.

Class 28 Monday, 11/17/14

Warm-Up: 

What do physics teachers usually do with a bowling ball hanging on a long, thin cable?

Today:

  1. Check/review homework
  2. Finish stuff that was assigned last class: 
    • Both spreadsheets must be completed by next class.  Do not turn in the Cardboard Car Analysis Spreadsheet.  Just finish it and save it on your drive.
    • Make a copy of this Cardboard Car Analysis Spreadsheet on your drive.  Collect more data if needed.  Save your spreadsheet on your drive under a sensible name.
    • Once you have completed your analysis spreadsheet, enter data from that spreadsheet in the Physics 100 Cardboard Car Data spreadsheet.
  3. Work on cars.
  4. Add graphs to car analysis spreadsheet.

Homework:  

  1. Read textbook section 8.6 and review sections 8.4 and 8.5.  Answer review questions # 12& 13  (page 117).  Answer Think and Explain # 3-6 (page 118).

Class 27 Thursday, 11/13/14

Warm-Up: 

How could we measure the force of friction that is acting on your car?

Today:

  1. Hand out new wheels (to people who ordered them)
  2. A3/4, A5/6:  Return journals.  I would like to see...
    • More quantity.  Even one simple change can represent a new iteration.  If you have created 3 or more versions already, you are doing okay.
    • Drawings -- show your changes -- unless your changes are very simple and easy to describe in words (e.g. "everything the same as V2.0 except drive wheels changed from 3" diameter to 6" diameter").
  3. Practice car calculations
  4. Make a copy of this Cardboard Car Analysis Spreadsheet on your drive.  Collect more data if needed.  Save your spreadsheet on your drive under a sensible name.
  5. Once you have completed your analysis spreadsheet, enter data from that spreadsheet in the Physics 100 Cardboard Car Data spreadsheet.

Homework:  

  1. Finish the back of Car Calculations Practice.
  2. Both spreadsheets (hyperlinks above) must be completed by next class.  Do not turn in the Cardboard Car Analysis Spreadsheet.  Just finish it and save it on your drive.

Class 26 Tuesday, 11/11/14

Warm-Up:  The picture on the right shows a compound bow pulley.  The orange arrow pointing down and to the left points in the direction of the shooter's fingers, which are pulling on the bow string (to shoot an arrow to our right).

A compound bow requires a lot of force at the middle of the pull and less force at the end of the pull. 


1.  Does this diagram show the pulley's configuration at the middle or end of the pull?
2.  How can you tell?

Today:

  • A1/2:  Return journals.  I would like to see...
    • More quantity.  Even one simple change can represent a new iteration.  If you have created 3 or more versions already, you are doing okay.
    • Drawings -- show your changes -- unless your changes are very simple and easy to describe in words (e.g. "everything the same as V2.0 except drive wheels changed from 3" diameter to 6" diameter").
  • Perform full analysis of your working car.  Here are video directions for measuring wheel force and completing the spreadsheet.
  • Enter your data into this spreadsheet and create a graph.

Homework:  None

Class 25 Friday, 11/7/14

Warm-Up:  The graph below was made by drawing (pulling back) the string of a compound bow.  The required force was measured at stretch distances between 0m and 0.4m.
1.  Why is it advantageous for the force in the graph to go up and back down?
2.  What was the maximum force?
3.  What was the approximate average force?
4.  Approximately how much work was done in drawing the bow?  (W=fd)
5.  Assuming that the bow is 100% efficient, how much energy could it give to an arrow?

Today:

  • Return ideas relating to steering. 
  • Go over answers to homework
  • Turn in your journal pages.  Put them in order -- oldest on top.  Staple them.  Make sure that all group member names are on top.
  • Work on cars.  Make sure that you have a working car ready to go at the beginning of next class.  We will be doing some testing of work, energy, and efficiency.
  • Car project journal template -- fill out one side of this sheet for every new version of your car

Homework:  None

Class 24 Wednesday, 11/5/14

Warm-Up: 

1.  I have two slingshots.  Slingshot A requires more force in order to stretch the bands, and slingshot B requires less force.  Using less force, I can shoot the same projectile farther and faster with slingshot B.

Explain how this is possible.  What are the implications for your car?

2.  What kinds of cars have the smallest turning radii?  What kinds have the largest turning radii?  What are the implications for your car?

Today:

  • Turn in ideas relating to the problem of making cars go straight.
  • Check and review homework -- car torque problems and questions
  • Work on cars
  • Car project journal template -- fill out one side of this sheet for every new version of your car

Homework:  

  1. In order to get credit for each question, you must write something down that is not nonsense.  Read Textbook sections 8.1, and  8.3-8.5.  Answer review questions 3, 4, 6, 7, 8,and  10 (p117).  Answer question #1 of Think and Explain (p118). A

Class 23 Monday, 11/3/14

Warm-Up: 

When the toilet paper starts to get low in this particular type of dispenser, the user can have trouble pulling out a long segment of toilet paper.  Any idea why?  The brand name is a hint.

Today:

  • Check and review homework
  • How to work torque problems (Car Torque Problems & Questions)
  • Work on cars
  • Measure top velocity using video analysis. Video your car crossing floor tiles.  Use v = d/t to determine velocity.  Record data in your journal.
  • Car project journal template -- fill out one side of this sheet for every new version of your car

Homework:  

  1. Car Torque Problems & Questions
  2. Propose a method of making sure that the cardboard cars go straight.  Write your idea down on paper and be ready to hand it in at the beginning of class.  Don't forget to put your name on it.

Class 22 Thursday, 10/29/14

Warm-Up: 
  1. What is torque?
  2. Suppose a nut is "frozen" onto a bolt.  To loosen it, you're going to need to exert 80 foot·pounds of torque.  You are unable to do this with the wrench that you are currently using.  What kind of wrench should you look for?
  3.  If you put much larger diameter wheels on your car, what will that do to your acceleration?  Is that a good thing or a bad thing?

Today:

  • Return Tests
  • Check your grades -- are you all set for the end of the quarter?
  • Check in -- how is the project going?
  • Get stuff organized
  • Work on cars
  • Clean up
  • Car project journal template -- fill out one side of this sheet for every new version of your car
  • Project guidelines

Homework:  Read textbook sections 11.1 and 11.2.  Answer review questions 1-4 on page 160 and "Think and Explain" # 1-3, on page 161. [ #3 is tricky.]

 

Classes 20 and 21 Friday, 10/24/14 and Tuesday, 10/28/14

Warm-Up:  Watch this video about the car project

Today:

Class 19 Wednesday, 10/22/14

Warm-Up: 
1.  What is the difference between kinetic energy and potential energy?
2.  Which type of energy is stored in dragster fuel (nitromethane)?
3.  Do you suppose nitromethane has more energy or less energy than ordinary gasoline?  What about diesel?

Popular Mechanics Dragster Info

Today:

  • Test
  • Project introduction:
    • Keeping a journal (Car project journal template)
    • Where to find cardboard
    • How the axles work
    • Expectations regarding hand tools
    • Scroll saw
    • Hot glue guns
    • Cardboard cutting
    • Parts storage
  • Mr. Stapleton will be out of town on Friday and Monday

Handouts:

Homework:

Class 18 Monday, 10/20/14

Warm-Up: 

1. What kind of rear tires do dragsters use?http://iml.jou.ufl.edu/projects/spring06/gregorzek/tires.html

2. Why do drivers do a "burnout" before each race?

3.  How else do dragsters increase traction?  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Top_Fuel

4.  What do dragster tires look like in slow motion? http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3Ug6w4ZjwVo&feature=related

5.  Why and how do vehicles "pop wheelies?" 

 

Popular Mechanics Dragster Info

 

Today:

  • Hovercraft analysis is due today.  Upload it using the form that was emailed to you.
  • Check/discuss Newton's Laws practice test
  • Begin Engineering Project -- build the fastest cardboard rubber band car.  Tentative guidelines

Handouts:

Homework: Study for the test

Class 17 Monday, 10/13/14

Warm-Up: 

Suppose you wake up one morning and feel much heavier.  Ordinarily, you weigh 140 pounds, but when you step on your bathroom scale (top right), the scale says you weigh 280 pounds!  You haul yourself to the doctor's office, and the scale there says you still weigh 140 pounds, but you feel super heavy.  So does everyone else you meet.

It turns out that your situation is the result of a prank by a mischievous and advanced alien civilization.

1.  What might the aliens have done in order to cause this change? [There are multiple possibilities.]

2.  Explain why your bathroom scale and the doctor office scale disagree. Assume that both scales are working properly.

3.  Mr. Stapleton weighs about 190 pounds on Earth, which means his mass is about 86kg.  Calculate the force of gravity that is pulling Mr. Stapleton and the Earth toward one another. Use the formula for universal gravitation, on the right.

  • m1 = Mr. Stapleton's mass = 86kg

  • m2 = The Earth's Mass = 5.97 x 1024 kg.

  • d = The distance between Mr. Stapleton's center of mass and the Earth's center of mass ≈ 6,390,000m

  • G = The Gravitational Constant = 6.67 x 10-11 Nm2kg-2

 

Today:

  • Go over homework: 
    •  A5/6 -- Newton's 2nd Law practice  last page
  • A5/6 -- the rest of Newton's 2nd Law practice
  • Work on hovercraft analysis
  • Work on Newton's Laws Practice Test
  • Upcoming Engineering Project -- build the fastest cardboard rubber band car.  Tenative guidelines

Handouts:

Homework:

  1. hovercraft analysis due next class.  If you want to use Logger Pro, you will need to do this on a school computer.

  2. Newton's Laws Practice Test  due next class

Class 16 Thursday, 10/9/14

Warm-Up: 
Suppose you find yourself stranded in the middle of a large room.  You are stranded because the floor is completely frictionless and level.
  1. Describe how walking usually works, and explain why it won't work in this situation.

  2. Describe what you could do in order to escape.

Today:

  • Go over homework: 
    •  A5/6 -- #10-15 on Newton's 2nd Law practice
    •  A1/2 and A3/4 -- turn-in textbook questions
  • A5/6 -- the rest of Newton's 2nd Law practice
  • Work on hovercraft analysis
  • Upcoming Engineering Project -- build the fastest cardboard rubber band car

Handouts

Homework:

  1. Due Next Class: A56 -- last page of Newtons 2nd law practice. 

Class 15 Tuesday, 10/7/14

Warm-Up: 

Suppose you shove a 0.2kg sled on level ground.  After you let go of the sled, the sled slides for 6s and 20m before coming to a stop.

  1. Use the formula a = 2d/t2 to calculate the deceleration of the sled.
  2. Calculate the force of friction acting on the sled as it came to a stop.

Today:

  • Discuss the answers to these quesstions
    1. Which formula works best for determining a Newton sled's acceleration? (a = Δv/Δt   or   a = 2d/t2)
    2. According to your spreadsheet, how do the projectile-pushing action forces compare to the sled-pushing reaction forces?  Theoretically, which force should appear to be slightly greater?
    3. Assuming that they are stretched the same amount, do 3 rubber bands push a 100g projectile with the same force that they push a 500g projectile?  Explain
  • Go over homework: 
    • A1/2 and A3/4 -- last page of Newton's 2nd Law practice
    • A5/6 -- turn-in textbook questions
  • A5/6 -- how to complete Newton's 2nd Law practice
  • Ride hovercrafts on ice and find out...
    • What's a hovercraft's coefficient of friction?
    • Who can generate the most force?
    • What's the thrust of a leaf blower?

HandoutsNewton's 2nd Law Practice

Homework:

  1. Due Next Class:A56 -- #10-15 on Newtons 2nd law practice.  A12 and A34: Newton's laws textbook questions

  2. Due Class After Next (Monday):  Analyze the hovercraft videos.  Calculate each of the following using a spreadsheet, explain your methods, and show your work.  You will have 30 minutes of class time to work on this on Thursday.

    1. Force generated by someone pushing

    2. Force of friction acting on hovercraft

    3. Force of thrust generated by a leaf blower.

Class 14 Friday, 10/3/14

Warm-Up: 

1.  What is the difference between a 2-stroke engine and a 4-stroke engine? How can you distinguish one from the other?

2.  At a similar horsepower, why are 4-stroke engines typically heavier?

Today:

  • Finish spreadsheet stuff:
    1. Calculate and enter Rocket Average forces.  Enter data into the orange cells of the water rocket data spreadsheet.
    2. Complete calculations of sled and projectile accelerations and forces.  Upload your spreadsheet as specified in the directions. 
    3. Then consider these qeustions 1)  According to your spreadsheet, how do the projectile-pushing action forces compare to the sled-pushing reaction forces?  Explain.  2)  Assuming that they are stretched the same amount, do 3 rubber bands push a 100g projectile with the same force that they push a 500g projectile?  Explain
  • Newton's 2nd Law Practice

HandoutsNewton's 2nd Law Practice

Homework: A12, A34 -- last sheet of newtons 2nd law practice.  A56: Newton's laws textbook questions

Class 13 Wednesday, 10/1/14

Warm-Up: 

The Earth's orbit represents a balance.  It does not fly away from the Sun, and it does not get pulled into the sun.

1.  What prevents the Earth from flying away from the Sun?

2.  What prevents the Earth from flying into the Sun?

3.  According to Newton's 1st Law, are the forces that are acting on the Earth balanced?  In other words, is there a net force acting on the Earth?

4.  When the pipe on the right is swung in a circle, what happens to the objects and string?  Why?

Today:

  • A12 and A34:  Check homework -- last sheet of Newton's 1st and 2nd Laws handout
  • A56:  Finish Newton's 1st and 2nd Laws notes
  • Calculate and enter Rocket Average forces.  Enter data into the orange cells of the water rocket data spreadsheet.
  • Complete calculations of sled and projectile accelerations and forces.  Upload your spreadsheet as specified in the directions.  Then consider these qeustions 1)  According to your spreadsheet, how do the projectile-pushing action forces compare to the sled-pushing reaction forces?  Explain.  2)  Assuming that they are stretched the same amount, do 3 rubber bands push a 100g projectile with the same force that they push a 500g projectile?  Explain
  • What to do next: Rubber band cars? Paper rockets? Plastic rockets? Something else?

HandoutsNewton's 1st and 2nd Laws  -- Filled out version

Homework:

  1. A56 Only: Newton's 1st and 2nd Laws Practice -- last sheet (front and back) of Newton's 1st and 2nd Laws handout

Class 12 Monday, 9/29/14

Warm-Up: 

According to Newton's 3rd Law, Actions and Reactions are equal and opposite. 

  1. What things are NOT equal and opposite in this video?
  2. What things ARE equal and oppposite in this video?

Video Link to 500g Newton Sled Launch

Today:

HandoutsNewton's 1st and 2nd Laws  -- Filled out version

Homework: Newton's 1st and 2nd Laws Practice -- last sheet (front and back) of Newton's 1st and 2nd Laws handout

Class 11 Thursday, 9/25/14

Warm-Up: 

It is possible to pull the paper out from under the pen without tipping the pen.  How can it be done?  Why does that work?

Today:

  • Spreadsheets are due (complete on Google Doc, below) today.
  • Return tests
  • Check/review homework (textbook questions)
  • Newton Sled Activity

HandoutsNewton Sled Activity

Homework: None

Class 10 Tuesday, 9/23/14

Warm Up: 

1. Can you balance a meter stick on your finger with the meter stick standing on end?

2.  If you tape a heavy weight to one end of the meter stick, will it be easier to balance with the heavy end touching your finger or with the light end touching your finger?

3.  Why?

Today:

  • Motion (Kinematics) Test
  • Newton's Laws
  • Finish completing the Google Spreadsheet of Rocket Data.  Scroll to the right to see if any of your early calculations are incorrect.  If they are, you may change them.  (You will not be able to check data that are in columns farther to the right on the spreadsheet.)

Handouts Newton's 1st and 2nd Laws  -- Filled out version

Homework:

Class 9 Friday, 9/19/14

Warm Up: 

I am going to put a big rock on my head.  Then I am going to put a piece of wood on the rock, and someone is going to hammer a nail into the wood.  Will this hurt me?  Why or why not?

Today:

  • Analyze videos for rocket time aloft, acceleration, velocity, approximate height, etc. 
    • Finish your group's Excel spreadsheet.  Email to Mr. Stapleton
  • Newton's Laws

Handouts Newton's 1st and 2nd Laws  -- Filled out version

Homework:

  • Unit 1 (Motion) Test next class -- Tuesday.

Class 8 Wednesday, 9/17/14

Warm Up: 

There is a heavy object tied to the ceiling with a string.  There is an identical string hanging from the object.  I am going to pull on the bottom string until one of the two strings breaks.  Which string is going to break first?  Why?

Today:

  • Check/review practice tests
  • Analyze videos for rocket time aloft, acceleration, velocity, approximate height, etc. 

Handouts

Videos (from last year):

 

Homework:

  • Unit 1 (Motion) Test next Tuesday

Class 7 Monday, 9/15/14

Warm Up: 

1)  When a water rocket is launched, compressed air inside the rocket causes water to squirt out of the bottle.  How does this make the rocket fly?

2)  If you want to build a water rocket that flies high, you need to add some weight to its tip.  How does adding weight help?

3)  Successful rockets need fins in the back.  How do the fins help?

Today:

  • Finish going over answers to motion problems and calculating acceleration. 
  • Build rockets
  • Launch rockets?
    • Get a video of the entire launch. 
      • Before launch (during the video) stand next to your rocket.
      • Slow motion begins just before launch.
      • Slow motion ends after your rocket hits the ground
      • After the rocket falls to the ground, stand by your rocket again.  Video ends after you stand by your rocket.
  • Next Class:  analyze videos for rocket time aloft, acceleration, velocity, approximate height, etc.

Handouts

Homework:

  • Unit 1 (Motion) Practice Test -- due on Wednesday, 9/17.

Class 6 Thursday, 9/11/14

Warm Up: 

What would happen if you made a hole through the center of the Earth, and you jumped in?  If you came out the other side, where would you be? (antipodes map)

Excel spreadsheet -- falling through the earth

Today:

  • Return Graphs
  • Motion problems and calculating acceleration.  Complete and discuss.
  • Does anyone have 2-liter bottles?  -- next class, build (and launch?) rockets.
  • Work time 

Handouts

Homework:

  • Unit 1 (Motion) Practice Test -- due on Wednesday, 9/17.
Class 5 Tuesday, 9/9/14

Warm Up: 

The sets of dots on the right represent frames of video taken of two different balls that are falling from the sky.  The video camera takes pictures at a constant rate of 30 fps (frames per second).  One of the balls is in free-fall.  The other ball is falling at a constant velocity.

  1. Which ball is accelerating?

  2. How can you tell?

  3. What do you think "free fall" means, from a physics standpoint?

Today:

Homework:  None

Class 4 Friday, 9/5/14

Warm Up: 

1.  A car circles a track at a constant speed of 70mph.  Is its velocity constant?

2.  Records of 132 cats that jumped from windows of buildings showed a 90% survival rate.  The average drop was 5.5 floors. 

Injuries increased with increasing heights up to 7 floors. When cats fell from over 7 floors, they actually suffered from “less injuries.” 

Why do injuries increase from floors 1-6? Why would injuries decrease at over 7 floors?

Today:

  • Check/review homework
  • Analyze spool tractor videos:
    • Find and document your car's highest velocity -- video file name; starting frame for fastest crossing of a tile; end frame.
    • Confirm winning group
    • Use spreadsheet to create graphs of position vs time and velocity vs time
  • *Acceleration Notes? I put a video of these notes (from last year) on youtube. 

Homework: None

Class 3 Wednesday, 9/3/14

Warm Up Question:

The graph on the right shows the positions at different times for seven different people.  On a sheet of paper, list all of the people who are...
  1. moving at a constant speed
  2. moving backward (toward the sensor)
  3. not moving at all
  4. accelerating
  5. decelerating
  6. accelerating the fastest
  7. moving at the fastest constant speed

Today:

  • Warm-up
  • Save all handouts with a star (or asterisk).
  • Turn in course expectations if you have had them signed -- due today.
  • Check/review homework
  • Get textbooks
  • Build and race spool tractors
    • Use a stopwatch (e.g. phone timer) to measure average velocity over some distance greater than 3m
    • Get your tractor videoed with the slow motion camera
    • Next class -- use video to measure average velocity and maximum velocity with greater precision
  • We will be needing plastic bottles in the near future.  If you have empty 2-Liter bottles (or any other large bottles with caps that are compatible with 2-liter bottles -- must be for carbonated drinks), please bring them in.

Handouts:  Spool Tractor Activity 1

Homework:

  • Read textbook sections 2.1-2.4 (speed, velocity, and acceleration).  On page 23, answer review questions 1, 4, 6, 9, 10, 11
Class 2 Friday, 8/29/14

Warm Up Question:

Suppose the graph on the right was made by a student walking near a motion detector. 

1.  How fast, in meters per second, was the student moving during the first 4 seconds?

2. What was his/her velocity during the last three seconds?

Today:

  • Warm-up
  • Turn in course expectations if you have had them signed (not due until next class).
  • More directions regarding motion-matching activity, then finish.  ?Begin assembling spool tractors when you finish?
  • Begin velocity notes
  • We will be needing plastic bottles in the near future.  If you have empty 2-Liter bottles (or any other large bottles with caps that are compatible with 2-liter bottles -- must be for carbonated drinks), please bring them in.

Handouts:

Video:

Homework:

  • Get course expectations sheets signed and returned by next class (Wednesday, 9/3)
  • Finish last page of velocity notes handout
Class 1

A-Day: Wednesday, 8/27/14

Physics 100: Mr. Stapleton

Warm Up Question:

Spin one of the "sprotating cylinders" by pressing one end until it squirts out from under your finger.  Try pressing the other end.

When the cylinder is spinning, why do you only see the symbol that you press?

Slow motion

Today:

  • Learn names/pronunciations
  • Fill out info sheets
  • Enter attendance
  • Slideshow(s)
  • Go over course expectations, class overview
  • Mr. Stapleton background, philosophy, etc.
  • Itroduction to lab next class: Motion Detecting, part 1 (matching graphs)

Handouts:

Homework:

  • Sign and return course expectations by next Wednesday, 9/3.  Turn in the whole sheet.  If you need another copy, print one from this website.

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