Class 25: Friday, 11/14/18

Warm Up: 

If you have an iPhone, try the iRhino 3d app.  You can view 3-D files that you have emailed to yourself. [Before emailing, you need to either shade or render the object in at least one window.]

Today:  

  • Create a new page (Fan Car Project) in your Engineering Notebook Google site.  Include a graphic on your main page that links to your Fan Car Project page (see Mr. S. example, below). On the Fan Car project page, insert links to two Google Docs -- one describing the project guidelines (class 17, below), and another linking to your engineering log for this project [Here's a template for your engineering log].  It can look just like your trebuchet page, but it should be about Fan Cars.
  • Mr. Stapleton's Example Google Site

Homework:  After class on Monday, your Google Site must be updated as described above.  Your engineering log must be complete at least through version 1.

Class 24: Friday, 11/8/18

Warm Up: 

1.  If you want to make an assembly of parts that fit together, how can you make sure that one piece will fit into another?  Specifically, how can you make sure that the fit won't be too tight?  Watch this video to see how.

2.  If you're building a complex structure that will eventually become a bunch of individual parts that are unioned together, should you start unioning the parts right away, or should you wait until all of the parts are done?  Why?

Today:  

  • Continue soldering together your power-trains  -- Unless some other group desires to go first, the first group will be the group nearest the hallway door.  The order will proceed clockwise (viewed from above).
  • Charge /discharge your capacitor and try out your motor.
  • Document your project -- take pictures, screen shots, etc.
  • Reflect on your project so far.  How is it going?  Do you need to change tactics?

Homework:  None

Class 23: Wednesday, 11/6/18

Warm Up: 

1. What is a capacitor, and how does it work?

2. What can happen if you over-charge a capacitor?

3. What precautions should you take when you charge your capacitor?

4. Does the capacitor polarity matter?

5.  How can you discharge a capacitor quickly?

Today:  

  • Begin soldering together your power-trains  -- Unless some other group desires to go first, the first group will be the group nearest the hallway door.  The order will proceed clockwise (viewed from above).
  • Charge /discharge your capacitor and try out your motor.
  • Document your project -- take pictures, screen shots, etc.
  • Reflect on your project so far.  How is it going?  Do you need to change tactics?

Homework:  None

Class 22: Monday, 11/4/18

Warm Up: 

How does soldering work?

Today:  

  • Begin soldering together your power-trains.
  • Charge /discharge your capacitor and try out your motor.

Homework:  None

Class 21: Thursday, 10/31/18

Warm Up: 

 

Today:  

  • Check in -- how are things progressing?
  • Motors, capacitors, and switches have arrived.  I will bring in the soldering iron tomorrow.

Homework:  None

Class 20: Tuesday, 10/29/18

Warm Up: 

None

Today:  

  • Mr. Stapleton is gone.
  • Work on your designs.  If you develop multiple versions, create and save images of those versions.  Screen shots are okay for now.
  • If you want to 3-D print while I'm gone, the helpful guy in the maker space is Adam Repash (arepash@ewsd.org)
    • 3-D Printing Steps, for now:
      1. Arrange all of your parts so that they sit on the same plane.  Check this in front view or right view.  All of their bottoms should be even when viewed in front or right view.
      2. Make sure everything is the size that you want.  Use Analyze, Distance to check.
      3. Set the units to millimeters.
      4. Save As.  Choose the file type stereolithography (.stl)
      5. Talk to Adam Repash, in the library maker space.  Ask him if he can print something for you, and ask him how you should get him the .stl file.

Homework:  None

Class 19: Friday, 10/25/18

Warm Up: 

None

Today:  

  • How to use Cura.
  • Adding color and rendering.
  • "printing" to image files vs rendering vs clipping tool

Homework:  None

Class 18: Wednesday, 10/23/18

Warm Up: 

The propeller on the right has overhangs. 

1.  How does a 3-D printer print overhangs?

2.  In a 3-D printer, does the head move, does the bed move, or do both move?

3.  Open Rhino and try the loft command.

Today:  

  • Next class -- trebuchet take-down and how to use Cura
  • Finish your practice car. 
  • Work on fan cart project. 
    • Choose 1 or 2 partners
    • Brainstorm ideas.
    • Create one or more sketches.
    • See class #17 for details.

Homework:  None

Class 17: Monday, 10/21/18

Warm Up:  Suppose you want to print the propeller on the right, so that it fits nicely on a quadcopter motor shaft.  What's the smartest way to make sure that you get the right fit?

Today:  

  • Return project grading sheets.  Discuss grading.
  • Continue practice car work.  See last class.
  • Fan cart project details
    • Group size:  2 or 3 students
    • Goal:  Design an aesthetically pleasing, mostly 3-D printed fan cart that will travel a 10 foot section of the hallway in the shortest amount of time using as little plastic as possible.
    • Allowed materials:
      • One standard powertrain: mini-quadcopter motor, 10F super capacitor (charged to 3V), wire, and slide switch
      • 3-D Printed PLA
      • Bamboo Skewers
      • Hot glue
    • Additional Requirements and clarifications:
      • Powertrain must be removable and must be held securely in place by a snap-fit.
      • Any 10 foot span may be designated by the team, and the car may start from any distance, relative to that 10 foot span.
      • The entire operation of the car must occur on level ground, and the capacitor must be the sole energy source.
    • Function Scoring:  Score =V-(m/10), where:
      • V = the car's average velocity over a 10ft span
      • m = mass of plastic, according to Cura
      • Deductions for non-secure powertrain and/or any other failure to comply witht he rules/requirements
    • Aesthetics Scoring:  photographs of the cars will be judged by unbiased humans who are asked to, "choose the #1 and #2 most attractive cars."
    • Motor and Capacitor dimensions (approximate) :  Rhino File

Homework:  None

Class 16: Monday, 10/14/18

Warm Up:  None

Today:  

  • Continue practice car work.  See last class.
  • Note:  The fan cart project will be a team project.

Homework:  None

Class 15: Thursday, 10/10/18

Warm Up:  Open up Rhino.  Create a truncated pyramid, like this one.  Then flatten it into a net by using the UnrollSrf command.  During the UnrollSrf command, set Explode to "no."

Today:

  • Rhino Practice: Design a car.  Create a virtual rendering of the car and then build the car out of cardboard.

    • Constraints:

      • There must be at least one "front" wheel that is 2 inches in diameter

      • There must be at least two "Rear" wheels that are 3 inches in diameter

      • At least one wheel must have exactly 3 spokes.

      • Chassis must be 2" wide at the widest point and 7" long.

      • Wheel base (distance front axle to rear axle) must be 4 inches.

      • There must be 0.5" of ground clearance at the lowest point.

      • The axles must be made from our trebuchet axle nails (0.125" in diameter, and 3.5" long). 

      • Cardboard is 0.15" thick.

    • Materials:  tape, hot glue, paper for printing templates, nails, cardboard, cutting tools (utility knives, scroll saw, scissors...)

    • Process:

      • Design the car, in Rhino, using inches as your units.

      • Create a color rendering of your car, and email a perspective view to jstapleton@ewsd.org

      • Lay out the car parts so that their shapes can be printed in TOP VIEW. 

      • Make a scaled (1:1) template by printing the parts on paper.

      • Glue the paper to cardboard

      • Cut out the cardboard parts and assemble the car.

Homework:  None

Class 14: Tuesday, 10/8/18

Warm Up:   Suppose you want to design a 3-D printed, propeller-driven car that will travel as far as possible using the energy stored in one 3V, 20F supercapacitor, and you want to use as little plastic and printing time as possible.  What might your car look like? 

Today:

  • Prepare for the next project -- 3D Printed, Supercapacitor-Powered Fan Cars.  This project will require CAD skills, so you will spend a few classes learning to use CAD software called Rhino.  You will also learn to use the laser cutter and 3-D printers.  Contraints are TBD, but possible constraints are print time and print material volume

  • Some Rhino Construction Methods:

    • 3-D Design to 3-D printer

      • [Easiest]  One piece

      • [Moderate] Assembly of multiple pieces

    • 3-D Design to 2-D for cutting

      • [Moderate]Manual cutting from a Rhino template

      • [More Difficult] Manual cutting from a dimensioned plan created in Rhino

      • [More Difficult] Laser cutting with butt joints

      • [Most Difficult] Laser cutting with box joints

  • Today's tasks -- get acquainted (or Reacquainted) with Rhino; build some stuff and save it in a sensible location: 

    • First steps/getting oriented

      • Viewports, Dialog Box (help, hints, and its roll in modifying commands),

      • Help menu

      • Google

      • Undo, Delete

    • Changing views, perspectives, modes

      • Chaning viewpoint vs moving objects

      • Ortho, Osnap, Smartrack...

      • Transformations -- move, copy, rotate, scale

      • Building with shapes (difference, union, intersection, split...)

      • Selecting/deselecting, selecting an object that closely overlaps another

      • Curves vs. Surfaces vs. Solids

      • Save, Save As, and Incremental Save

      • Special commands? -- Fillet?

    • Create a Designing Solutions Rhino Folder on your F:Drive

    • Design some stuff.  Create a folder for each of the following, and keep your incremental saves in that folder:

      • Chassis

      • wheels

      • axles

      • propellers

    • Rendering/Printing

    • Preparing for 3-D Printing

Homework:  None

Class 13: Friday, 10/4/18

Warm Up:  

Check out the competition results.  You can see how your throws compared to last year's competitors at the VT Pumpkin Chuckin' Festival.  [This year's VTPC results are not yet posted.]

Today:

    • Finish engineering log

      • must have at least 3 versions -- 1.0, 2.0, and 3.0. 

      • Links must work correctly.  All items should be shared with Mr. Stapleton.  If you keep them all in one Google Drive folder, that's easy.

    • New Project -- 3D Printed and Laser Cut Supercapacitor-Powered Fan Cars!

Homework:  None

Class 12: Wednesday, 10/2/18

Warm Up: 

Trebuchet Competition Day!

Today:

  • Weigh-in and measurement

  • Contest in Auditorium -- three rounds of throws.  Best throw counts. 

  • If you want to keep your trebuchet, take it home.

  • Disassemble and put away materials.  Don't throw anything away that can be put to good use.  When in doubt, ask Mr. Stapleton.

  • Friday --

    • Finish engineering log

      • must have at least 3 versions -- 1.0, 2.0, and 3.0. 

      • Links must work correctly.  All items should be shared with Mr. Stapleton.  If you keep them all in one Google Drive folder, that's easy.

    • Introduce next project

Homework:  None

Class 11: Friday, 9/27/18

Warm Up: 

What are some preparations that you should make today, to be sure that you're ready for Wednesday's class?

 

Today:

  • Last trebuchet work day.

  • Contest next class.

Homework:  None

Class 10: Wednesday, 9/25/18

Warm Up: 

1.  How is brainstorming supposed to work?  What is the process, and what is the goal?

2.  Brainstorm some problems that need solving (potential long-term projects for this class).  Ideally, these should be interesting, important, and within your grasp.  But since we're brainstorming, anything goes. 

 

Plan for the next week:

  • Wednesday and Friday:  Keep iterating.  Make sure that you get at least three "versions" that you can put in your engineering log.

  • Wednesday

    • Weigh-in and measurement

    • Contest -- three rounds of throws.  Best throw counts. 

    • If you want to keep your trebuchet, take it home.

    • Disassemble and put away materials.  Don't throw anything away that can be put to good use.  When in doubt, ask Mr. Stapleton.

  • Thursday --

    • Finish engineering log

      • must have at least 3 versions -- 1.0, 2.0, and 3.0. 

      • Links must work correctly.  All items should be shared with Mr. Stapleton.  If you keep them all in one Google Drive folder, that's easy.

    • Introduce next project -- ???

Homework:  None

Class 9: Monday, 9/23/18

Warm Up: 

1.  The new projectile minimum mass (including the fishing fishing line) is 3.4g.  If your projectile is under weight, how can you increase its mass?  If it's over weight, how can you decrease it's mass?

2.  What's the difference between an observation and an inference?  Where is it most appropriate to place each in your engineering log?  Mr. Stapleton's Supercapacitor Airplane Inventor's Log

 

Today:

  1. Discuss Engineering Notebooks and Engineering Logs.  At this point, you can fix them and get points back.
  2. Work time
  3. Document progress

Homework:  

  • Add to your project documentation
  • Some of you should fix your Google Site
Class 8: Thursday, 9/19/18

Warm Up: 

1.  What are the advantages of a floating arm trebuchet?

2.  What advantage do floating arm trebuchets and wheeled trebuchets have in common? (and bicycles & cars, too, for that matter)

3.  Does the counterweight need to fall straight downward in order for a trebuchet to be efficient?  Why or why not?

 

Today:

  1. Retrieve and try out the new table top.
  2. Work on your trebuchet.
  3. Document progress
  4. Pictures from today

Homework:  Add to your project documentation

Class 7: Tuesday, 9/17/18

Warm Up: 

1.  What is the purpose of a prototype?  Does it matter if it's version 1.0, 2.0, 3.0...?

2.  How much time should you spend on a prototype?

3.  Does a prototype need to be well made?

4.  For this trebuchet project, should you make sure that all of your prototypes adhere to the rules?

5.  Does a prototype need to be complete?

 

Today:

  1. Discuss the Engineering Notebooks -- I took a look at them.
    1. Instead of just linking your Engineering Log doc, embed it on the trebuchet project page.
    2. ?
  2. New tools and duct tape.
  3. Work on your trebuchet.
  4. Document progress

Homework: Before next class, fill out your engineering log template for version 1.0.  Though the template does not refer to it, make sure that you include a design sketch.

Class 6: Friday, 9/13/18

Warm Up: 

How do you change the bit in the drill press, and how do you reposition the bit?  What's the chuck? What's the chuck key?  What's a keyless chuck and what's the special trick for working a keyless chuck?  How and why might you want to reverse the drill rotation direction?

 

Today:

  1. Engineering Notebook Google Site should be set up and shared with Mr. Stapleton.  Regarding the sharing of your linked Google Docs, you might want to share them with "anybody with a link."  That way, if you decide to share your site with someone new (e.g. Mrs. Smith), you won't have to go back and change all of your share settings for every doc.  On the other hand, if you keep all of your docs in one Google Drive folder, it might work to share the entire folder with people.  Let's test this.
  2. Work on your trebuchet.
  3. Document progress

Homework: None

Class 5: Wednesday, 9/11/18

Warm Up: 

1)  How does a trebuchet get its energy?

2)  How can you increase the amount of energy going to your projectile?

3)  How can you tell if your trebuchet is making efficent use of its available energy?

4)  What's the best way to learn as much as you can about your trebuchet's performance?

 

Today:

  1. Begin working on first graded assignment (will be due before class on Friday) -- Engineering Notebook Google Site setup
    • Create a Google Site (see class 3, below)
    • Share your Google Site with jstapleton@ewsd.org.
    • Make sure that it has a trebuchet project page.
    • On the trebuchet project page, create links to your project log and the trebuchet project guidelines.  If you would rather create Google Site sub-pages for your project log and trebuchet project guidelines, you may do that.  I think the Google Site option looks better and seems more professional, assuming that your links work intuitively.  However, last year's students had so much trouble with formatting, linking, and publishing their Google Site subpages that I decided the Google doc option was probably better for most students.
    • Insert a photo of your design drawing into your project log, with version 1.0.
  2. Work on your trebuchet.
  3. Document progress

Homework:

  • Finish #1, above, before class on Friday.
  • Get your course expectations signed and then return them.
Class 4: Monday, 9/9/18

Warm Up: 

The Where Does It Belong? Quiz

1. Bolt cutters    2. Tape    3.  Safety glasses    4. Hot glue sticks    5. Rulers

6. Pliers    7.  Scissors    8.  New wood    9. Wood scraps    10.  Hot glue scraper

11. Heat gun    12. Fishing line    13.  Hot glue gun    14.  Hand drill    15.  Nice set of drill bits

16.  Tape measure    17.  Paper clips    18.  Metal file    19.  Sandpaper 

20.  Broom and dust pan    21.   Shop vac  22.  Hand saws    23.  Clamps

 

Today:

  1. First graded assignment (will be due on Friday) -- Engineering Notebook Google Site setup
    • Make sure that it has a trebuchet project page.
    • On the trebuchet project page, create links to your project log and the trebuchet project guidelines.
    • Insert a photo of your design drawing into your project log, with version 1.0.
    • Share your Google Site with jstapleton@ewsd.org.
  2. Work on your trebuchet.
  3. Documentation to collect over the next few class days...
    • Design sketch
    • Photo of Version 1.0
    • Observations/Testing Data
    • Ideas for improvement

Homework:

Class 3: Thursday, 9/5/18

Warm Up: 

Open this Google Site Template on your chromebook

 

Today:

  • Set up your own Engineering Notebook Google Site
  • Use the template from the warm-up to make your own version of the site.  Change the images (a student chose them).   Make your own copies of this Project log template and this Trebuchet project guidelines doc.  Then link your docs to your trebuchet project page on your Google Site.
  • Documentation to collect over the next few class days...
    • Design sketch
    • Photo of Version 1.0
    • Observations/Testing Data
    • Ideas for improvement

Homework:

Class 2: Tuesday, 9/3/18

Warm Up:

1.  Triangles are often incorporated into structures, because they add stability.  Why are triangles stable?

2.  If you wanted to easily wiggle the frame of the trebuchet on the right, where would you push it, and in what direction?

 

Today:

  • Check homework -- trebuchet sketches
  • Review course expectations.
  • Label your storage box.
  • Trebuchet Problem parameters and constraints -- one additional rule -- you can't copy Mr. Stapleton's design, if you've seen it.
  • Begin work on your trebuchet.  Take pictures of each new creation, experiment, discovery, etc..  Make notes about your ideas, questions, and actions, relating to this process.  You will enter them periodically in your Project Log.  See an example of the documentation you should be collecting --  Mr. Stapleton's Supercapacitor Airplane Inventor's Log
  • Documentation to collect over the next few class days...
    • Design sketch
    • Photo of Version 1.0
    • Observations/Testing Data
    • Ideas for improvement

Next Class: Set up a Designing Solutions Google Site -- Your "Designing Solutions Notebook"

 

Homework:

Class 1: Thursday, 8/29/19

 

Warm Up:  What are some of the steps of the Engineering Design Cycle?  To give a concrete context for discussion, what steps would you take if you were trying to engineer a solution to the wastefulness of the tooth flossing process?

 

Google image search for "engineering design cycle"

Today:

  • Learn names/pronunciations
  • Enter attendance
  • Student info sheet (unless you are in my physics class)
  • Check to see if you're on my email list, find my website, and see if your chromebook is working in here.
  • Slideshow of things on my phone from the last year, etcMy goals
  • Feedback from last year
  • Begin research for first design project -- Trebuchet Problem
  • Trebuchet Problem parameters and constraints
  • Possible mini-projects:
    • Trebuchets
    • Supercapacitor Airplanes (CAD -- 3D printing)
    • Generate electricity
    • Boats (CAD -- Laser Cutting)
    • Arduino --
      • automate a task with sensors and outputs,
      • bluetooth smart switch
    • 3D printed and laser-cut gadget

Handouts:

  • Course expectations will be handed out next class.

Homework:

  • Brainstorm trebuchet ideas.  Sketch a prototype and bring your sketch to class on Tuesday.